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Old 12-23-2018, 09:41 PM
 
4,600 posts, read 6,274,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
And the ability to not hallucinate after 72 hours without sleep.

Too funny..I did that once..Worked like crazy for four days and my mind started playing tricks on me..

Here is something I noticed in the AA community..People are sold on degrees and being able to say they work for ________. Yet others will come to the U.S. hungry and willing to do whatever it takes to start a business.


As for why the AA community? We as a whole will buy from anyone. Just as a side note with these kids today being as they are every community has issues.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:36 AM
 
10,916 posts, read 2,972,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
This interesting piece floated by in today's NY Times.

It resonated because I read much the same material in the high-school-level book about consumer issues that set me on that road of interest about mumble decades ago.

Sad how nothing's really changed. The cycle of poverty in depressed neighborhoods is fueled by a lack of economical grocery, staples and shopping options - which is putting it gently; stores in bad neighborhoods are often openly predatory, as the above article notes. Zero progress here in most of a lifespan.
The AA community here in Sarasota is within easy walking, biking, car ride or bus ride(s) of everything from Whole Foods to the Farmers Market.

As you probably know, many NYC areas (Harlem, for example) are certainly not food deserts these days. Amazon and MANY others deliver anything...most anywhere.

I'm certain some areas remain food deserts but the same is true even for wealthier folks of other ethic backgrounds. We used to laugh when traveling through NY State (upstate)....seemed only two meals were possible, steak or pancakes.

Anyway, wanted to throw out there to AA friends....that Flea Markets and stuff like that are often very decent money. Buy and sell. I taught my 14 year old about supply and demand one day by buying something online and instantly selling it on eBay for a $30 profit. Turned out the market didn't yet know this particular accessory (wireless card for a laptop) was discontinued...

It's as simple as that. I could start making money within 24 hours at any time....heck, I saw last night that a sale item I could buy on Amazon for $14 was selling for $22-$27 elsewhere.

You have to start somewhere and being a merchant of sorts (working for yourself or even as a helper or partner in a flea market or online/offline sale) is a place where they don't look at your resume (or lack thereof).

BTW, I didn't finish high school, but probably did as well or better than 95% of my peers who have advanced degrees. Learning is continuous.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:48 AM
 
10,916 posts, read 2,972,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
This interesting piece floated by in today's NY Times.

Sad how nothing's really changed. The cycle of poverty in depressed neighborhoods is fueled by a lack of economical grocery, staples and shopping options - which is putting it gently; stores in bad neighborhoods are often openly predatory, as the above article notes. Zero progress here in most of a lifespan.
The so-called cycle, IMHO, doesn't represent the real world.

There is little doubt that the biggest predictor of where you end up is where you start - but, still, here is what I have seen in my life.

I am from Philly - and tens of thousands of AA folks moved up a bit and went to Willingboro, NJ (a old Levittown community). While they didn't have the $$ and upward mobility from there (as the former residents had), this was still a massive leap from the slums of Philly. There were other similar areas, representing many tens of thousands....a reasonable percentage of the AA population. I worked with some of these people as a volunteer with a local org and then the boys and girls club.

Once these populations left the city it is/was easier now for them to go to free/cheap community colleges - so those that desire more education can receive it.

Still, I won't argue that it's not tough for many. I think we'd do much better with programs to front and lend money to these populations as opposed to just "safety nets". One org I work with actually trains the youth from Camden NJ in tech. Quite a few have went onto good jobs, including in Silicon Valley.

Another truism - many AAs from the north have moved down south....either after retirement or at other times. They have family and land (lots to build on) in many areas down there. I met one small builder who was developing some of the family land in SC....his contractors were his relatives who had spent their lives in NYC learning trades and moving up the ladder. This is not a one-off. There is a new South in many places fueled by these populations. It's easy for an honest hard worker to get a job at the new car plants (decent wages) in the South....

While the cycle does exist (in many white families also - in Appalachia, MO, etc.) we shouldn't under-report the real changes taking place.
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Old 12-24-2018, 09:20 AM
 
501 posts, read 171,586 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
CD does not have a large number of Black people posting. Hence, most comments won't be representative of the reality of Black life in America.

I suspect this thread is a back handed attempt to disparage Black people.
Didnít take long for some snowflake to claim racism.
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Old 12-24-2018, 04:25 PM
 
14,990 posts, read 19,171,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Chee, t'anks for 'splainin' all dat.

/closethread time
I've been laughing about this joke for the last 2 hours
(I bet you are so dumb, you think it's true)
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Old 12-25-2018, 02:11 PM
 
45 posts, read 11,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueZircon View Post
I am 24, black, and live and have lived in majority black neighborhoods. I find it a bit embarrassing to notice that many owners of businesses large or small in majority black neighborhoods are not owned or run by black people. Personally, I know next to nothing of economics, credit, and managing businesses overall.

Finance-wise, how or why did so many non-blacks manage to run nail salons, gas stations, restaurants, supermarkets, etc in black neighborhoods?

My intent is not to offend people but to seek advice on what can we as black people do to step up economically in terms of ownership and credit. I assume you have to have good credit, but what are some specific step-by-step guides in terms of the necessary paperwork such as licensing and permits, or if a degree is necessary, on owning and starting a business like a nail salon, beauty supply store, gas stations, restaurant, etc.

I live in the Miami, Florida area if that matters.

The groups you mention probably got their start utilizing SBA loans that are available to Non-US Citizens. How these groups collateralized these loans has always been of interest to me. Anyone know how the federal govt. monitors and validates the legality of the funds use?
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Old 12-25-2018, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,977 posts, read 1,643,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralUSHomeowner View Post
The groups you mention probably got their start utilizing SBA loans that are available to Non-US Citizens. How these groups collateralized these loans has always been of interest to me. Anyone know how the federal govt. monitors and validates the legality of the funds use?
Given that SBA loans start much, much higher than most people think, it's unlikely. And your emphasis is peculiar - there are no "SBA loans that are available to non citz" except in the meaning that permanent residents (green card holders) can apply for SBA loans... with quite a few more qualifying hoops. Also, non-citizens can apply as long as they maintain US collateral of greater value than the loans. Did you have some problem with either case?

I'd bet that very, very few retail stores in underprivileged networks are riding on formal loans of any kind, SBA, bank or otherwise.
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Old 12-25-2018, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,977 posts, read 1,643,887 times
Reputation: 7318
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
The so-called cycle, IMHO, doesn't represent the real world.
I was talking more about the cycle of predation than that of generational lives. Certainly there are those who break the cycle and get up and out (and even help others get up and out)... but the cycle of high prices and predatory marketing in depressed areas continues, despite (as the article notes) sometimes ignoring consumer protection and usury laws. If we had this all identified ca. 1970, what the hell is it still doing here well over forty years later?

I don't really care if someone who thinks it's a great deal goes and buys a $1k iPhone, although the cycle that drives that level of idiocy is not without issues. But when people of struggling means get roped into paying $1200 for an XBox... the same as their grandparents got roped into paying many times the value of a cheap living room or bedroom set... I dunno.
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Old 12-26-2018, 07:57 AM
 
14,990 posts, read 19,171,260 times
Reputation: 12049
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueZircon View Post
I am 24, black, and live and have lived in majority black neighborhoods. I find it a bit embarrassing to notice that many owners of businesses large or small in majority black neighborhoods are not owned or run by black people. Personally, I know next to nothing of economics, credit, and managing businesses overall.

Finance-wise, how or why did so many non-blacks manage to run nail salons, gas stations, restaurants, supermarkets, etc in black neighborhoods?

My intent is not to offend people but to seek advice on what can we as black people do to step up economically in terms of ownership and credit. I assume you have to have good credit, but what are some specific step-by-step guides in terms of the necessary paperwork such as licensing and permits, or if a degree is necessary, on owning and starting a business like a nail salon, beauty supply store, gas stations, restaurant, etc.

I live in the Miami, Florida area if that matters.
7 pages and one week later ..... OP still only has one post in City-Data
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:54 AM
 
892 posts, read 358,652 times
Reputation: 1737
Small business is hard work, have to put in 16 hours a day, low margins. Not many Americans citizens of any color are willing to do it, when they know English and can just get a govt job, office job, sales job, or customer service job. Immigrants don't usually know English, so they are excluded from most private and public sector jobs and have to make a living the only way they can.
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