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Old 01-26-2019, 10:26 AM
 
2,423 posts, read 584,787 times
Reputation: 2009

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
Yup. Also, if employees are being paid more, they don't need as many hours, nor do there need to be as many positions.
You lost me on this conclusion.

 
Old 01-26-2019, 10:28 AM
 
2,423 posts, read 584,787 times
Reputation: 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
The restaurant business is one of the hardest, and the most likely to fail. There is a lot of waste in "inventory," because of the nature of food, and a small profit margin.

However, because you chose to enter a business with a small profit margin, that does not mean you can expect others to work for less than a living wage.

You have to learn how to be efficient, make it work, make it profitable while paying living wages...or go into a different line of business.

If you can stay afloat ONLY by paying substandard wages, that is not a viable business. WalMart used to make that argument, too, while the communities paid for services and food for their underpaid employees. WalMart now pays their employees more, and is still raking in the profits, despite increased competition. THAT is a viable business.

Cut your workers' hours, cut your staff, become more efficient, cut your restaurant hours, make better deals for supplies, move to a cheaper location...whatever business owners have to do to succeed, is what you must do. Or go into a different, easier business.

Paying workers more is good for the economy. Those workers are customers and will spend their wages for goods and services, enabling other businesses to have more profits. That's how that works. Also, there are plenty of restaurants who are successful. Study how they do it or have done it. One problem I see is that there are too many restaurants. Too many businesses competing for a finite number of customers.
Don't worry. Your approach will certainly cure this 'problem'.
 
Old 01-26-2019, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
1,960 posts, read 949,826 times
Reputation: 4586
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
However, because you chose to enter a business with a small profit margin, that does not mean you can expect others to work for less than a living wage.
Conversely, if you choose to work in an industry with thin margins, you cannot expect the same pay as everyone else. You can't act surprised when the business goes belly-up and your job evaporates.

It's silly to assume there's this minimum standard that absolutely everyone must meet, no matter what. It's like the people who railed against southeast Asian "sweatshops", where children worked "too long" for "too little", doing "too much". They won, and got the sweatshops closed down... and now those kids and their families have nothing. But hey, so long as the do-gooders get to crow and virtue-signal, who cares?

Rooting for businesses to fail because you don't think they pay "enough" is insane. Especially when you, yourself, do not run any business, let alone one in the industry in question. Hooray for you, you're a fantastic human being! Just don't bother to look at those who suffer for you to stand on your pedestal.
 
Old 01-26-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,773 posts, read 739,254 times
Reputation: 2241
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grlzrl View Post
Scary thought. But people don't understand that the big corporate interests win in these situations. They hate corporations so you would think knowing this might make them extend exemptions to smaller companies.
I thought that too at one time, until I realized it was just an act. In reality, they are being funded and work for the big corporations, and their main goal right now is to help the mega corporations become even bigger by creating laws and regulations that smaller businesses cannot keep up with, and in turn, end up selling to the bigger corporations. And with each new buyout, us, the consumer, will be the biggest loser when we won't have as many choices anymore.
 
Old 01-26-2019, 11:38 AM
 
4,504 posts, read 2,371,172 times
Reputation: 3827
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsmith5a View Post
Breitbart... Ask why they are paying so far below the average wage? And why are restaurants so determined to defy economic gravity and pay such subpar wages? All the other businesses can pay livable wage jobs but they can't? If you cant pay a decent wage, it's time to close up shop. If I create a job paying $.01 an hour, you would not call that a job. It's not a job if it doesn't pay a livable wage. They need to stop creating trash and start creating real jobs for people.
If it’s so easy, maybe you could take a crack at it?

Why is it everyone else’s responsibility to create jobs with a “livable wage”, whatever that means.
 
Old 01-26-2019, 01:51 PM
 
Location: equator
2,941 posts, read 1,266,402 times
Reputation: 7179
Quote:
Originally Posted by lchoro View Post
They cited the case of Angelica Kitchen as an example of the impact of the minimum wage hike.

"The pioneering East Village vegan eatery is slated to close on April 7th, after forty years of operation—its owner, Leslie McEachern, said that rising rents and a changing neighborhood led to its demise."

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cu...ngry-and-weird

Average wage range for food service workers tops out at around $15/hr. So in one fell swoop, they attempted to create a new floor which is going to weed out the less productive.
"Rising rents and changing neighborhood" don't sound like minimum wage issues...
 
Old 01-26-2019, 02:02 PM
 
Location: equator
2,941 posts, read 1,266,402 times
Reputation: 7179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Fortunately, four college grads should find it easy to do that math.
LOL. You covered a lot of ground with that one line!
 
Old 01-26-2019, 02:12 PM
 
Location: equator
2,941 posts, read 1,266,402 times
Reputation: 7179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kthnry View Post
One other point: Yes, it's tough for small businesses to adapt to a sudden large increase. But what about all the large companies whose shareholders are getting rich on the backs of poorly paid contract employees? Back in the olden days, companies would hire all levels of employees directly, and all employees would benefit proportionately. Even the lowliest worker would get a decent wage, benefits, profit-sharing/bonuses, opportunities for advancement, etc. Now only the essential core employees are permanent and all the other services are outsourced to the lowest bidder, meaning a big race to the bottom for big chunks of the workforce while stockholders rake in the big bucks. Is this okay with everyone?
No, not OK with me. Thanks for your insight here.
 
Old 01-26-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,101 posts, read 3,087,597 times
Reputation: 12408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grlzrl View Post
You lost me on this conclusion.
Because of the low wages, it's common for restaurant workers to be working two part time jobs, or one full time job and a part time job. Employers are loathe to pay overtime, so to get in your 60 hours (or whatever you need) you need multiple employers. If wages are adjusted such that a person can live on only one job's hours, not as many positions are required.
 
Old 01-26-2019, 04:32 PM
 
780 posts, read 606,757 times
Reputation: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
Because of the low wages, it's common for restaurant workers to be working two part time jobs, or one full time job and a part time job. Employers are loathe to pay overtime, so to get in your 60 hours (or whatever you need) you need multiple employers. If wages are adjusted such that a person can live on only one job's hours, not as many positions are required.
Being a waiter literally requires zero skill sets. You can walk down the street and start work that afternoon with some basic instruction.

Not really fair to complain about the pay for that sort of job.
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