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Old 02-15-2019, 06:58 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,318 posts, read 10,385,137 times
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I notice that Whole Foods has lower prices for certain organic produce than the dominant mainstream supermarket has for non-organic; probably a loss-leader, not worth the effort to go there every week, but maybe once a month yes.

Also, as mentioned, Whole Foods has certain products that can help people with certain health issues which other stores do not have.

I increasingly find that I can buy quantities of bulky dry whole foods, including oils, and other goods, plus add-ons, at competitive prices through Amazon, which owns Whole Foods, but also from other sellers, with fast-enough shipping already included in the price (sometimes "free" shipping is as fast as premium paid shipping), making trips to an actual Whole Foods store that much less frequent.
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Old 02-15-2019, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
22,141 posts, read 16,319,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
I notice that Whole Foods has lower prices for certain organic produce than the dominant mainstream supermarket has for non-organic; probably a loss-leader, not worth the effort to go there every week, but maybe once a month yes.

Also, as mentioned, Whole Foods has certain products that can help people with certain health issues which other stores do not have.

I increasingly find that I can buy quantities of bulky dry whole foods, including oils, and other goods, plus add-ons, at competitive prices through Amazon, which owns Whole Foods, but also from other sellers, with fast-enough shipping already included in the price (sometimes "free" shipping is as fast as premium paid shipping), making trips to an actual Whole Foods store that much less frequent.
Exactly.

I live in an area that has lousy grocery stores and little competition. Prices and quality reflect that. We have one main regional grocer, Aldi, one dumpy Kroger, Walmart, and a few very low end grocers. The nearest Whole Foods is about a hundred miles away.

Whole Foods is actually cheaper on quite a few staple items for their 365 brand than my mainline regional grocer. A gallon of Food City brand milk at my local Food City is usually $4.99. 365 regular milk at Whole Foods in Asheville was less than that a couple of weeks ago. The quality difference between Whole Foods and Food City's produce is light years apart. Aside from Sam's Club or local farmers, forget about getting decent meat in this area. Whole Foods has a good meat department.

That's not even counting items that are not available locally. If it's not perishable or a nongrocery product, I can probably get it off Amazon. Otherwise, many of those items are not available at local retailers.
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Old 02-15-2019, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC
1,851 posts, read 2,372,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heart84 View Post
I have seen a lot of inflation in food items I buy over the past 12 months. Some items have increased multiple times this past year alone. Also, the issue of stealth inflation with smaller packaging......
"stealth inflation" -- very well put
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Old 02-15-2019, 11:28 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,953 posts, read 52,363,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
I have found that Safeway is ridiculously expensive. Same with Acme. I go to a locally owned chain, but they are expensive as well. Best is WalMart, but I hate their produce.

Does Costco have a Scan and Go app? Sam's Club has one and I love, love, love it! Scan your items with your app as you put them in your cart and then when you are finished pay from the app and walk out the door. The person at the out door scans a bar code generated in the app and away you go. DH, unfortunately, hates self serve checkouts. He once threatened to walk away from a cart full of stuff at Lowe's if they didn't open a register. Since we had about $600 in stuff they obliged. I will use them if I have a few things, but I don't think they are great for large orders or if you have coupons.
No, only the Kroger store QFC have them, but no one used them. They also have order online and pick up, but no one uses that either.
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Old 02-15-2019, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,307 posts, read 7,614,492 times
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Everything's going up everywhere. I don't shop at WF. Don't even know where the closest one is.

I do shop at several markets, and an occasional run to WalMart for staple items. Back in late November, I bought Schweppes Ginger Ale, 2 liters, for $1.00 each at a local chain grocer. In December, it was $1.25 at WalMart. Last week, the WalMart price was $1.58 for Schweppes and $1.68 for Canada Dry.

Pretty steep increase(s) for a relatively inexpensive item. I won't bother to list all of the price increases over the last two months. I'm sure I'm not the only one who noticed.
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,247 posts, read 48,410,148 times
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Most of our produce is obtained from local Farmer's Markets.

Do you folks who shop at these big chains, have access to local Farmer's Markets?

What about Certified Organic?

How do prices compare to your local farm prices?
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:37 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,562 posts, read 27,030,607 times
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I don't know about Whole Foods prices because I've never shopped there, but I do know that prices of groceries are going up every where. It might not have anything to do with Amazon.
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,307 posts, read 7,614,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Most of our produce is obtained from local Farmer's Markets.

Do you folks who shop at these big chains, have access to local Farmer's Markets?

What about Certified Organic?

How do prices compare to your local farm prices?
Yes, I have access to local Farmer's Markets. Except that in the Winter, in Pennsylvania, there isn't much farming going on. It's too cold to grow.

We start getting "home-grown" produce somewhere around late June, early July. We have a weekly Farmer's Market in one city and another in the city just North of this one. There are pop-ups here and there that come and go so only the city ones can be counted on. Oct/Nov signals the end with mostly squashes and potatoes and the hardier types.

I know that Wegman's sources their produce locally - in season - and I try to buy there when I can.
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
22,141 posts, read 16,319,792 times
Reputation: 25566
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Most of our produce is obtained from local Farmer's Markets.

Do you folks who shop at these big chains, have access to local Farmer's Markets?

What about Certified Organic?

How do prices compare to your local farm prices?
Depends.

The closest year-round comparison I can give is in Asheville, a little under a hundred miles away, with a large farmer's market (WNC Farmer's Market) that runs year-round. Some of the produce is local year-round, grown in greenhouses and such. Some produce is trucked in from SC/GA, which arrives earlier than up here in the mountains.

In-season, locally grown, non-organic produce is almost always cheaper than Whole Foods, and oftentimes cheaper than the regional grocer. Locally raised/butchered meat is probably around the same price as Whole Foods, possibly a bit more expensive than the local grocer, and definitely more expensive than a Sam's Club. Condiments - they have a Jamaican guy that has all sorts of sauces - and local pickled goods are always more expensive at the farmer's market.
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:41 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,562 posts, read 27,030,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
Be thankful you don't have Celiac Disease because I guarantee you that you'd be singing a different tune about the availability of gluten-free foods. And price would be of little concern to you.

We eat gluten-free in my family and it is nice that more Gluten-free foods are available. However, I find that many of the commercially made products are inferior to what I can make at home. Not to mention that home made are much less expensive.



So, both price and quality are of concern to me when shopping for gluten-free foods.
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