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Old 03-11-2019, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Sweden
23,385 posts, read 65,434,207 times
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Old 03-11-2019, 11:32 AM
 
627 posts, read 426,287 times
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Did some digging and learned the following that I found interesting.... Random facts about Sweden. Also looks like they have since privatized a lot of their previous social programs.

In Sweden personal income is taxed at a rate of 61.85 percent, plus a 7 percent social security tax rate for employees. On top of these taxes, Sweden also has a 25 percent consumption tax. Corporations are taxed at 22% to keep them from leaving (Americas average corporate tax rate is 28%). For healthcare Swedish law stipulates patients should wait no more than 90 days to undergo surgery or see a specialist. However, every third patient waits longer according to the Swedish governments own figures. Wait times vary however depending on where you live in Sweden. According to a Sweden 2016 report nationwide, the median wait time for prostate cancer surgery was 120 days, but 271 days in the northern county of Vasterbotten. Interestingly the heart attack survival rate is above the OECD average. Many patient's either went out of country or progressed in stage of their cancer.

In 1994 Sweden made changes by deregulating everything from taxis, air service, railroads, all utilities, and school choice. They also promote heavily an open-competition school choice model and anyone can start a school.

Many don't realize that the massive safety net of Sweden didn't work. It almost bankrupted the country in the 70's and 80's. After becoming unimaginably expensive in an aging society, Sweden privatized their pension plan, 18-month paid parental leave, and government-paid childcare to avoid collapse years ago.
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Old 03-11-2019, 02:53 PM
 
Location: NYC
12,272 posts, read 8,244,017 times
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Sweden is more socialist progressive while Japan is more socialist but conservative. Japan hasn't really changed it's economic policy much the last 30 years. It's still primarily an export manufacturing based economy while Sweden is more services oriented economy.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Central Washington
697 posts, read 229,546 times
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Neither Sweden or Japan are socialist countries. In a 2015 speech at the Kennedy School of Government Danish PM Lars Rasmussen spoke about this common misconception after Bernie Sanders said the US should copy Scandinavian
"socialism" during a debate.

Quote:
"I know that some people in the US associate the Nordic model with some sort of socialism. Therefore I would like to make one thing clear. Denmark is far from a socialist planned economy. Denmark is a market economy,” The Nordic model is an expanded welfare state which provides a high level of security for its citizens, but it is also a successful market economy with much freedom to pursue your dreams and live your life as you wish,” he added.
https://www.thelocal.dk/20151101/dan...-not-socialist
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Old 03-13-2019, 06:13 AM
 
10,503 posts, read 8,007,236 times
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For all you folks lamenting about a homogeneous country, are you saying America was a failed experiment from the very beginning and from its foundation?

Since Europeans came over and encountered the original Anericans, this country wasn't homogeneous. Then, remember that a huge chunk of land was owned by Mexico. Then add the Africans and Asians who came over fairly early.
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Old 03-13-2019, 09:54 AM
 
3,188 posts, read 1,817,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karpo1 View Post
Having lived my first 30 years in Nordic country, 50% is not enough.
I had good job as an engineer paid ~$5000/month, that was about double of average pay across all jobs.
My income tax was 42% flat from each euro paid. VAT is like sales tax, it was 24% charged from all goods including groceries (more recently this was dropped to 12%). Gasoline was ~8$ per gallon, cars were taxed based on CO2 level of engine, average tax on 2.0l engine 100% of the car value.

So actual tax rate was >75% for me. Today happier with 2.5x pay and income tax of 12% in TX. Sure need to pay medical insurance 5k per annum and need to save higher education for kids and 7k property taxes, but that 50% difference in taxation level makes life easy.

Nordics are great for low paid non skilled person, everyone else is taxed to death.
The Ďnetí financial position will be different for everyone when you start to include things like college costs, access to public transportation and total cost of healthcare services required.

Of course if your only focus is on taxes paid and you donít look at what you receive for your tax money, sure. Your scenario could work out.
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Old Yesterday, 08:09 AM
 
7,345 posts, read 4,736,106 times
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Japan is like Sweden, in that both begin and end with consonants, both end with "n", and both have a repeated vowel. However, Sweden has one more consonant, taking it further away from being almost-palendromic.
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Old Yesterday, 08:29 PM
 
67 posts, read 24,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damba View Post
The Ďnetí financial position will be different for everyone when you start to include things like college costs, access to public transportation and total cost of healthcare services required.

Of course if your only focus is on taxes paid and you donít look at what you receive for your tax money, sure. Your scenario could work out.
Received 'free' bachelors degree, that would cost ~40k in US in state college. Lower US taxation allows me to save similar education for me 3 kids without any problem.

Average mid income engineer thrives in US salary, not really in Nordics. They do fine but in US one can thrive.
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Old Today, 08:51 AM
 
3,188 posts, read 1,817,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karpo1 View Post
Received 'free' bachelors degree, that would cost ~40k in US in state college. Lower US taxation allows me to save similar education for me 3 kids without any problem.

Average mid income engineer thrives in US salary, not really in Nordics. They do fine but in US one can thrive.
Itís a wash and arguably subjective. That $50K per kid college cost could have gone toward your retirement, or many other things. You lose your job here and healthcare suddenly becomes unaffordable or the quality/coverage tanks.
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Old Today, 02:40 PM
 
67 posts, read 24,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damba View Post
Itís a wash and arguably subjective. That $50K per kid college cost could have gone toward your retirement, or many other things. You lose your job here and healthcare suddenly becomes unaffordable or the quality/coverage tanks.
It is not a wash. In Europe I was saving max $500 month after paying $1000 mortgage and other expenses.
Now saving >$3000/month. I am getting close to full 401k yearly, in Nordics I was going to get state pension only, about $2500/month if would have worked full time there, still expecting about $700/m.

Yes, Nordic system is great for people losing their jobs without any savings. In US one can save enough not to worry so much, most people choose to use all their income, though. I agree that heath care is way too expensive without a good job. I used to work in various other countries before US and in few my employer paid 5000/annum for full healthcare and dental in private hospitals/clinics, no deductible.
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