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Old 03-27-2019, 09:15 PM
 
19 posts, read 1,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemming95 View Post
It makes me worry that if I leave money in my will to someone on medicaid that they will lose their benefits.
My fiance's parents passed away. they set up a special needs trust for his brother who is on SSI so he wouldn't loose his benefits. It cost them around $4500 to set this special needs trust up, it is included within the actual Trust itself.
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Old 03-27-2019, 09:31 PM
 
358 posts, read 101,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canlog View Post
Can you still get SSI even if you didn't work all that much? I know for SS you need to have worked for a number of years to qualify for it but for SSI there aren't such conditions correct?

Could a beggar in the street who turns 65 suddenly get SSI, if they only worked for a few years during their lifetime but not enough time to qualify for SS?
I'm not certain if the laws changed within the last 8-10 years but two former coworkers, one 40-ish year old now lives on disability (he hurt his elbow and lives with constant pain) while managing his three rentals and he's been here only 7 years. Another coworker from India had his mother come out and she started receiving SSI within a year. All this is according to what these individuals told me. I was really surprised - especially about the elderly mother who came out to live with her son.

They both have really huge well-furnished houses in two of our best neighborhoods.

So it surprises me to read about such financial restrictions. The only two cases I know of are these two people from work friends. Especially being fairly new residents who are getting a generous assistance. I doubt other countries would do that for us.

I recall in 2016 Trump stated there is so much corruption with disability. Sounds like this would qualify.
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Old 03-27-2019, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,107 posts, read 2,578,915 times
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SS is Social Security.

SSI is Social Security Insurance. If you become disabled and can't work, but you haven't gotten all the credits required when you did work, you would only qualify for SSI. I think that maxes out at about $800 a month.

SSDI is Social Security Disability Insurance. If you become disabled and can't work and HAVE met all the required credits, you'll get SSDI. When I reach my full retirement age, my SSDI will convert over to SS. I'm pretty sure SSI works the same way.

I know there are some things that are simply considered necessary, like owning a car or a house and those things are exempted. For instance, my car was worth $5000 and I still qualified for SSDI and I'm sure I would have qualified for SSI as well.
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Old 03-28-2019, 08:49 AM
 
6 posts, read 2,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
SSI is basically welfare. You donít have to work to get welfare, thatís the point of welfare.
I've seen a homeless man who seemed to be over 65. If a person over 65 can have SSI, how could there be homeless people who are over 65?
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Old 03-28-2019, 10:01 AM
 
Location: SoCal
12,015 posts, read 5,696,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canlog View Post
I've seen a homeless man who seemed to be over 65. If a person over 65 can have SSI, how could there be homeless people who are over 65?
I donít know but I know people who never paid into a system ever and they got SSI. You need an address perhaps.
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Old 03-28-2019, 11:51 AM
 
5,457 posts, read 3,544,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canlog View Post
Does this mean that if your computer is more than $2000 you cannot qualify? What about chair, bed, desk, and clothing. Would that count towards $2000 worth of countable assets?

It says it right in your quote.


Chair, bed, desk, clothing etc aren't really worth anything. They're typically not of significant value.
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Old 03-28-2019, 11:53 AM
 
2,608 posts, read 639,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I would not see a lawyer for $50k trust, it cost $5k for a trust.
If the alternative is facing a dollar-for-dollar spend-down, you're darn tootin' a fee equaling "only" 10% of the amount would start looking like it's worth it!
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Old 03-28-2019, 02:34 PM
 
104 posts, read 27,182 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canlog View Post
I've seen a homeless man who seemed to be over 65. If a person over 65 can have SSI, how could there be homeless people who are over 65?

I know of someone paying $700 a month rent and lives with 3 to 4 other people. Rent for a studio is above $900 and a one bedroom in the city where they live is well above $1000 even in the shadier parts. They do not live on the West Coast or NYC, they live in large city the Deep South, and they work for a living but still cannot afford more than what they are paying now. This person has a disability but does not receive any government benefits. A $750 a month SSI check would cover rent and that's it. A lot of people also cannot get into what we know as Affordable Housing because of bad credit or even not good enough credit, and/or the housing programs are closed, not letting anyone else in. Waiting lists for housing are years out. Much of the time, homeslessness happens when people become ill and have either no family left or no family capable of taking care of them. If the person I know becomes ill and cannot work, they will more than likely be out on the streets (or couch-surfing) until their number is called on the waiting list and even that is not a guarantee of anything.
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Old 03-28-2019, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,024 posts, read 13,847,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
SS is Social Security.

SSI is Social Security Insurance.
No, SS is Schutzstaffel.

SSI is Supplemental Security Income.

Quote:
Originally Posted by canlog View Post
I've seen a homeless man who seemed to be over 65. If a person over 65 can have SSI, how could there be homeless people who are over 65?
Because he's a nutter.

Nutters cannot maintain a household, much less their own personal hygiene. Within 3 weeks it would roach-infested, bed-bug infested, lice infested and termite infested, with feces and urine everywhere and who knows what else.

A nutter would burn down the building a kill people trying to light a can of Sterno.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemming95 View Post
It makes me worry that if I leave money in my will to someone on medicaid that they will lose their benefits.
Talk to an attorney. There are many, many legal ways around that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shikoba View Post
I have a few questions if anyone knows

Here's a hypothetical situation.

Husband receives $1400 mo Social Security at age 67 (Full Retirement Age)
Wife just turned 65 so will sign up for Social Security on Monday

She qualifies for exactly $700 a mo on her own work recordaccording to her online Social Security account

The SSI payment in her state of Nevada for her living situation... is $820 mo

Wouldn't she receive another check from SSI for $120 to bring her monthly income to $820??

They own a modest house and have no other resources, just $100 in the bank and a 5K pickup truck.

So they are under the SSI resource limit. Thanks

No.

She has to declare her husband's income/assets. The cap for unearned income like OASI benefits is $1,177/month and $1,400/month exceeds that even with the deductions allowed.

Even so, check anyway, because Nevada might allow deductions that the Social Security Administration (who administers SSI) doesn't allow.

Best bet is to draw on her husband's OASI account, in which case she'll get half of his or $700, and then when he dies, she files for survivor's benefits, which is the "S" in OASI (Old Age and Survivor's Insurance).

Now, if she wasn't married, then, yes, she could file for SSI can get $820, and it would be apportioned $700 from OASI and $120 from SSI as a single check/payment, except being in Nevada there's a State supplement, so that would be two checks/payments.

Even if they got divorced, it wouldn't matter, because they'd still be living in the same household.
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Old 03-28-2019, 05:10 PM
 
4,175 posts, read 2,379,488 times
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Canlog, what, specifically, is your question?

Are you looking for yourself? For someone else? Just curios?

1) household goods, including a computer are considered to have little value, no one is goibg to pay $2k for a USED computer, for instance. It is a "personal effect", "personal effects" are NOT assets.

Assets are cash, bonds, stocks, some life insurances ( NOT " final expense burial insurance ", nor is a burial plot or any funds to be used to bury the individual who receives benefits), that type of assets.

If you have $2500 in the bank, it'll cost you because it is asset over $2k, but if you have a gold guilded framed mirror worth $500,000 unless it IS listed as an asset ( by say antiques roadshow and insured), its a "personal effect", so NOT counted.

Underwear is a " personal effect", no one is going to pay for a used pair.
A mattress even a $5,k sleep number bed is a "personal effect" and NOT included.

The "personal effects" are items used for every day use, of little or no resale value, of no value to anyone else, and are NOT assets.
"Personal effects" could also be the contents of a shopping cart a homeless person pushes around that no one would pay good cash for.

Having $2500 in savings, and $5k worth of stock, and $5000 in bearer bonds is waaaaaay over the limit.

The basic idea is that a person with sellable or cash assets won't need SSI or Medicaid , or at least have to spend it to get it.

As someone upstream said, SSI is a social security welfare type program.

Now SSDI is totally different, but if one doesnt qualify for SSDI, there is SSI, and you cant have assets as noted above over $2k. The basic idea is you are poor and will remain so or you dont need SSI.

SSI also can make up shortfall if income is below the allowable SSI limit, to bring one up to the allowable limit.

If that doesnt answer your question, WHAT is your specific question?
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