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Old 12-20-2018, 11:00 AM
 
424 posts, read 90,455 times
Reputation: 579

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Unfortunately, some people have a myopic viewpoint based on their limited personal experience and what they saw on a tv program.

I have over 25 years experience in human resources at Fortune 500 companies involved in hiring and terminations including layoffs. On the hiring side, I have seen age discrimination and layoffs due to poor judgments/business decisions of management or sometimes due to acquisitions. With acquisitions certain functions/jobs are eliminated and fewer people are needed. Manufacturing goes overseas, plants relocate, etc. The workers affected often due to no fault of their own and are not easily absorbed by the economy. If this occurs in one's 50's it's very difficult to recover from, perhaps experience was industry specific and skills are not transferrable to other industries or the jobs no longer exist. The world has changed from a manufacturing economy to service economy. People suggest retraining and/or going back to school but sometimes this isn't feasible from a cost standpoint. A tough pill to swallow is the intellect/skills required today may not a match for those displaced.

This isn't to say, some people don't get comfortable in their job, resist change, don't upgrade their skills and enjoy outsized wages/benefits due to seniority/job longevity. We called this "the golden handcuffs" It's patently unfair to state many are unemployed due to poor performance or lack of drive.
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Old 12-22-2018, 04:32 AM
 
106 posts, read 51,343 times
Reputation: 304
I see a future where more and more people will be living out of their cars and vans. I see van living as a huge emerging trend. The housing industry has not even begun building enough housing for people and now the economy is about to go back into a recession again. The standard of living in the usa is not too high as it is and it's about to get a lot worse for most people.
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Old 12-22-2018, 10:28 AM
 
1,152 posts, read 605,800 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good_Teacher View Post
I look at the year 2000 as the end of the good times for the average American. Since then we have had a jobless recovery that has really only helped an elite. The standard of living for the typical American worker has gone down hill. College costs are sky high, utility and energy bills are going even higher, gasoline is moving towards $4.00 a gallon, borrowing costs are high and the availability of credit is falling. While our federal income taxes have fallen somewhat, we are being hit by so many hidden taxes and rapidly rising local and state taxes and surcharges. All these costs make our standard of living continue to drop. How can America ever recover from this?
Good_Teacher, the decline began to become became apparent well before that. The purchasing power of the median-wage is dependent upon that of the Federal minimum wage rate which peaked when the February 1968 increase to $1.60 became effective. Our nation's economy would have been much better served if we later gradually continued to increase and retain our minimum rate's purchasing power to a somewhat higher level.

President Johnson was fighting a two front war against poverty and Vietnam. The USA could not do what no nation has accomplished, we can't afford simultaneously pay for both butter and bombs.
Mohammad Ali was correct; his "people's enemies" weren't in Asia. USA's enemies were identified and described by President Eisenhower as our own "industrial-military complex".

The decision to engage in a Asian land war was devastating to our nation's political and economic well-being.

Refer to
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
It also reflects the fact that personal income does not keep up with productivity.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:U...old_income.png
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Old 12-23-2018, 09:13 AM
 
12,113 posts, read 16,820,921 times
Reputation: 17478
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
My early years were always under employed . But I spent a lifetime morphing in to related areas that made sure I was not under employed . I have been unemployed but never more than a week as I made sure I was always on competitors radar so I would be someone they rather have with them then against them
And that was when?
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Old 12-25-2018, 06:04 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
27,156 posts, read 59,014,924 times
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Link to Fortune Magazine coming cover stories on America’s shrinking middle class:

Healthcare and the War on the Middle Class | Fortune
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Old 12-25-2018, 09:47 AM
 
92 posts, read 11,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Link to Fortune Magazine coming cover stories on America’s shrinking middle class:

Healthcare and the War on the Middle Class | Fortune
It is largely an advertisement to attend https://www.fortuneconferences.com/f...m-health-2019/. That's one way magazines can make money: hold a conference & charge big bucks to attend.


At the same time, the link you provide shows the undue influence of hyper-partisan Arianna Huffington:


Quote:
We’ve been thinking about that A LOT lately as we put together the agenda for our fourth annual Brainstorm Health conference on April 2-3, 2019. The question, as my co-chairs Arianna Huffington and Dr. David Agus have been framing it—and trust me, you could not ask for two more brilliant, generous, and indefatigable partners to build anything—is: “What is health’s bottom line—and how do we improve it?”
Arianna, the CEO of Thrive Global and legendary founder of the Huffington Post, whom I regard as the Divine Disrupter—part holy woman and part technology guru—has been leading us to think about the “upstream” forces that are shaping our health needs and consumption.

Clifton Leaf, the editor-in-chief of Fortune, lost all credibility when he describes Arianna Huffington in such glowing terms. It guarantees a very biased view of the topic.
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Old 12-25-2018, 10:04 AM
 
66,731 posts, read 67,787,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
And that was when?
when i started out as an hvac mechanic . being the new guy out of trade school with no experience i was never allowed to do the work as a tech that i was trained to . i had to be a helper .

finally i went to another company , lied about my experience and got decent pay and was allowed to do my own thing as a tech ..
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Old 12-26-2018, 03:58 AM
 
73 posts, read 16,000 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
jobs, jobs, jobs.. and the only thing to do that, is less government involvement and less taxes!!
That's an opinion but it would be good to point your dear readers towards some evidence or reasoning to support these claims.

I would suggest that the best generator of new jobs is increased demand for the product.Old Henry Ford reputedly paid his employees well enough to be able to afford the cars that they were producing. I feel that today's management aim to minimise costs which includes both wages and numbers of employees. This works well enough for an individual company but when entire industries follow the same path, they can reduce the overall demand.

Consider the role of taxes and the famous Laffer curve. The implication is simply that there is an optimal rate of taxation. The argument is therefore just what that rate is. Income tax rates were much higher in the years after WWII and yet growth rates and employment opportunities were greater. One can only conclude that the relationship between taxes and growth is poorly understood. Taxes can actually be a method by which overall demand can be controlled. Similarly, government expenditures are means by which social and infrastructure policies can be controlled. It seems to me that political ideologies prevent us from from better analysing and researching taxation and the role of government.
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Old 12-26-2018, 06:51 AM
 
1,152 posts, read 605,800 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
jobs, jobs, jobs.. and the only thing to do that, is less government involvement and less taxes!!
Pghquest, mutually agreeing principles enter international trade transactions because they perceive it to be to their benefit; both principle parties are usually correct. But annual trade deficits are ALWAYS net detrimental to their nation's GDP and drag upon their numbers of jobs.

Refer to the improved substantially market driven trade policy described within Wikipedia's “Import Certificates”.

Import Certificate policy would significantly reduce, (if not entirely prevent) USA's chronic great annual trade deficits of goods and it would simultaneously increase our GDP and numbers of jobs more than otherwise.
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:38 AM
 
92 posts, read 11,814 times
Reputation: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not in Kansas any more View Post
Consider the role of taxes and the famous Laffer curve. The implication is simply that there is an optimal rate of taxation.

Respectfully, no, that is NOT the implication.


The implications are as follows:


  • At an income tax rate of 0% or less, zero income tax dollars are collected by the IRS.
  • At an income tax rate of 100% or higher, zero income tax dollars are collected by the IRS.
  • THEREFORE, there exists at least one income tax rate R such total income tax dollars collected T are maximized, where 0<R<100.


Note that maximizing T is a non-objective of income tax policy. Notice that nowhere does the concept of "optimal" come into the discussion.

Regarding funding the federal government, it is a two-step process.



  • Step One: Decide how much Federal Government we wish to purchase.
  • Step Two: Decide how to raise the requisite amount of tax revenue required for Step One above.


That's it.
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