U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 08:11 AM
 
1,120 posts, read 237,203 times
Reputation: 1841

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
if you think this is a decline you should have been around with us in the 1970's when i got dumped out of school in to vietnam ,,, the highest unemployment since the great depression , double digit inflation , a dead stock market , no gas , soaring oil prices and riots in the streets with students being killed in demonstrations at college .
I remember in the early 70s, Japan was sending food, blankets, and other forms of aid to residents of Seattle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 09:04 AM
 
2,509 posts, read 1,611,999 times
Reputation: 5430
That’s just it. They assume a baseline where the U.S always got what it wanted and that it was in full control. That was never the case. There’s always been a list of threats stacked a mile high. You can only think the U.S has declined enormously if you’re using a baseline that never existed. And really, much of the economic clout gained by Asia has come at the expense of the Europeans and the Japanese; not the U.S.

Global power ebbs and flows. The U.S still enjoys near hegemony. It would take multiple decades to dislodge these advantages. It also assumes that contenders rising don’t have problems of their own that could cause ebbs and flow in their rise. The U.S power has risen and fallen across many defining events. And it’s easier to hold onto control than it is to gain it. The story is far from over.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:08 AM
 
499 posts, read 120,402 times
Reputation: 790
I have no faith in humans. I am puzzled that we have not had a coup here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:20 AM
 
4,926 posts, read 2,578,342 times
Reputation: 4331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliott_CA View Post
Yes, California has a high poverty rate. A lot of is driven by the Central Valley, where families of immigrant agricultural workers live. The poverty rate is considerably lower in the main metro areas.
Uh....

Attached Thumbnails
US Decline-oakland.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:22 AM
 
25,298 posts, read 32,294,468 times
Reputation: 30797
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpacked View Post
i have no faith in humans. I am puzzled that we have not had a coup here.
lol!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:22 AM
 
3,323 posts, read 1,441,701 times
Reputation: 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by heart84 View Post
A reset is coming. You can feel it in the air. All the points you made are very valid (especially about the illusion of choice with the two-party establishment). Everything is a race to the bottom right now. It will take a reset to move things in the right direction again.
We can only hope it will move in the riht direction again. 2008 happened and what happened next? Public money was redistributed to the corporations to save the economy.

The fundamental pooint people fail to understand is everybody is on their own and would only safeguard their interests. No magic wand or party or President can change that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:24 AM
 
7,652 posts, read 7,067,672 times
Reputation: 5922
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatsright19 View Post
That’s just it. They assume a baseline where the U.S always got what it wanted and that it was in full control. That was never the case. There’s always been a list of threats stacked a mile high. You can only think the U.S has declined enormously if you’re using a baseline that never existed. And really, much of the economic clout gained by Asia has come at the expense of the Europeans and the Japanese; not the U.S.

Global power ebbs and flows. The U.S still enjoys near hegemony. It would take multiple decades to dislodge these advantages. It also assumes that contenders rising don’t have problems of their own that could cause ebbs and flow in their rise. The U.S power has risen and fallen across many defining events. And it’s easier to hold onto control than it is to gain it. The story is far from over.
Press coverage is slanted in favor of the governments where they engage in colonialism. Textbooks are as well (there is discussion in UK of incorporating colonial abuses in school textbooks).

They don't report a lot of what the US does. Successes and failures of covert actions aren't reported at all. They're often misrepresented as popular actions in those countries. The mass flight of refugees from US wars in those countries are usually blamed on the country of origin.

The main source of power is being able to print money with mostly impunity unlike the seventies. US, Japan, and Europe are well past the point where a debt crisis would've occurred in most other economies and forced a painful devaluation and restructuring. Japan is willing to buy up US assets to support their exports to the US. The printing activity can be switched among the three major central banks to mitigate the effect of a falling dollar on the price of commodities. At some point, other economies will be of sufficient size to pay for the commodities in their local currency, namely China, India, and other BRICs, and the game will change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:00 AM
 
992 posts, read 439,026 times
Reputation: 649
There were 3 rounds of technology revolutions, one lead by Britain and two lead by the US. I don’t think 70’s was a problem, there were chaos and Nam war, but not tech falling behind. There will be another round of tech revolution coming up. Once I saw the arrest of Huawei executive over Iran sanction, I knew this time is different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:17 AM
 
1,107 posts, read 545,870 times
Reputation: 1107
"One thing is clear. In the aftermath of the global recession of 2008, America and the world have been swimming in debt. America’s national debt alone has skyrocketed. While the Fed continues to justify flooding the market with cheap "reserve notes" based on the theory that it must supply these notes in order to support asset prices, the overall effect has been to debase the currency and prolong the pain of the American people.
As an entrepreneur who owns real assets — real estate, spectrum licenses and a publishing library, among others — I was able to benefit, at least on paper, from the Fed’s asset inflation strategy. I have been able to refinance my debt at attractive rates, and I've seen asset prices (but not necessarily values) climb. But others, especially workers (who derive the bulk of their income from salary instead of capital appreciation) and savers (retirees living on a fixed income), have lost under this post-recession scheme.
Workers lost because their spending power diluted drastically over the past 10 years. The costs of housing and energy have continued to rise in areas where the highest concentrations of jobs are located. For example, a young college graduate who wants to earn a high salary in the tech industry has to live in Silicon Valley, where even a base salary of $100,000 won’t enable them to afford to purchase a home there. Home prices are so out of line with average salaries that cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles are seeing an epidemic of homelessness never experienced since the Great Depression of 1929."
https://thehill.com/opinion/finance/...nomic-disaster
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:41 AM
 
2,509 posts, read 1,611,999 times
Reputation: 5430
Quote:
Originally Posted by lchoro View Post
Press coverage is slanted in favor of the governments where they engage in colonialism. Textbooks are as well (there is discussion in UK of incorporating colonial abuses in school textbooks).

They don't report a lot of what the US does. Successes and failures of covert actions aren't reported at all. They're often misrepresented as popular actions in those countries. The mass flight of refugees from US wars in those countries are usually blamed on the country of origin.

The main source of power is being able to print money with mostly impunity unlike the seventies. US, Japan, and Europe are well past the point where a debt crisis would've occurred in most other economies and forced a painful devaluation and restructuring. Japan is willing to buy up US assets to support their exports to the US. The printing activity can be switched among the three major central banks to mitigate the effect of a falling dollar on the price of commodities. At some point, other economies will be of sufficient size to pay for the commodities in their local currency, namely China, India, and other BRICs, and the game will change.
I agree, the dollar system and military are important....I’ve said many times on here how important our power to dominate global finance is.

The U.S economy was in power before the oil standard in 1971. It was strong before the original Bretton woods. It was strong before the usd overtook the pound. It was strong before the u.s economy overtook Britain in the 1890s. The source of power isn’t being able to be print money and be the key reserve asset. The power was already there.

It’s been strong under numerous systems. Whose to say, we don’t create and thrive in another system assuming this one is replaced? Why would the dollar still not play a huge role in say a basket of currencies being the new reserve asset? Or some other system that I can’t even imagine.

That’s the point of ebbs and flow. And the u.s has shown tremendous staying power. India or Brazil are going to stand in the way? No.

Last edited by Thatsright19; Yesterday at 10:49 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top