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Old 04-28-2019, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Thailand
5,708 posts, read 2,749,770 times
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Clearly.

https://youtu.be/xbq0OuJtErs?t=271
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Old 04-28-2019, 08:41 PM
 
8,724 posts, read 3,821,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Has to be one of my all time faves. I actually saw from a distance the crews filming the the mall scenes, not knowing at the time what was going on.

https://www.google.com/search?source...31.xFXOJxNdsnA
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Old 04-28-2019, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
8,278 posts, read 2,465,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
You have that bass-ackward. The economic policies of the prior administration were disastrous. The prior administration viewed business as an necessary evil source of tax revenue rather than as the principle engine of economic prosperity. The current administration has been the best in modern history with respect to the economy...
Sorry to burst your bubble, but Trump's GDP and jobs numbers have been no different from Obama's economic numbers.
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Old Yesterday, 02:04 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
3,451 posts, read 1,533,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
On one hand you say the Government is not to blame - yet don't note that tens or hundreds of BILLIONS were given BY THE GOVERNMENT PURPOSELY to corporations...adding to deficit for (likely) a generation or more...until we can somehow raise taxes enough to offset it.

No wars? Well, that would then make the case that military and security spending are down! Are they?

All this boom from no wars and no regulation....doesn't that mean the deficit goes down?

As far as China, that's as big of a joke as NK. We are two years plus in and look at the yearly trade deficits with China!

Do you really claim that, when we look back, the 4 year Trump term is going to show a lower total trade deficit with China then what existed before? I say no way......

Of course, the tariffs are already costing each American consumer $213 per year....it's coming out of our pockets, not that of China. Lose-Lose.

IMHO, of course!
Let's be clear, I think the government economic actions under Obama and Trump have been workable. As such, I don't blame the government. Obama needed to ensure the market lived for another day. He worked with the Fed early on in his Presidency and together they kept us out of a bank panic. The Trump plan is an older one, but one that makes sense to me. Hotbox the economy and let it take the hits that come with a trade war. If the ending effect is fairer trade with America's largest trading partners it has chronic deficits with, I don't see how anyone can argue that's bad for America. That action takes leadership.

The same wasn't going to cut it. American needed to show that we have the willingness and ability to close our markets to unfair trading partners.

Now, it would be great if Corporate leaders looked at this more as a one time favorable time as opposed to leveraging upon it continuing...but the participants that did it will simply have their death knells sooner. Regardless, our Corporate tax rates are now more inline with the rest of the world. That was always going to be an unpopular reform.

Besides....who cares if the average American spends $213 more per year. That's less than $20 a month. The average American saves just 3% of their income anyway down from 6% after the recession. That's far worse. Is the government to blame for people consuming their entire check during good times?

You can hate either President all you want, but the reality is that neither has done anything bad for the US economy. Oh, and what makes war expenditures expensive is that military procurement can't go down during a war. We could cut the military considerably if we weren't at war. You don't have that option when funding a hot conflict.
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Old Yesterday, 07:50 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
16,615 posts, read 19,142,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Sorry to burst your bubble, but Trump's GDP and jobs numbers have been no different from Obama's economic numbers.
Perish the thought, but maybe they are the same person.
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Old Yesterday, 08:46 AM
 
1,353 posts, read 298,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
Isn't this the basis of Rationalities?
I also disagree with Occaisional-Cortex regarding the size of the national debt.

But it is clear we do NOT have a revenue problem at the national level. We have an expenditure problem. We spend way too much.
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Old Yesterday, 08:51 AM
 
1,353 posts, read 298,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
I'd put quite a bit of stock in those who claim we are at "end stage capitalism" because the system does not scale. It was reliant on unlimited resources, cheap and slave labor and now...unlimited debt.
Incorrect. Economics is the study of unlimited human wants and desires in a world of finite resources, and Capitalism is the most effective system devised to allocate scarce resources among those infinite wants and desires.
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Old Yesterday, 08:59 AM
 
8,724 posts, read 3,821,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
Incorrect. Economics is the study of unlimited human wants and desires in a world of finite resources, and Capitalism is the most effective system devised to allocate scarce resources among those infinite wants and desires.
But is there a limit on USD?
How is our middle class doing?
Is our middle class flush with USD's?
Do we want to augment our middle class?
Can we augment our middle class without further taxes?

Or should we leave things be as they are and let our current system of capitalism do its thing?
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Old Yesterday, 10:04 AM
 
1,353 posts, read 298,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
But is there a limit on USD?
How is our middle class doing?
Is our middle class flush with USD's?
Do we want to augment our middle class?
Can we augment our middle class without further taxes?


Wages Gain, Payrolls Rise as Expansion Rolls Ahead
https://www.wsj.com/articles/hiring-...le_email_share

Hiring, Wages Gain Strength as Jobless Rate Holds Steady
https://www.wsj.com/articles/hiring-...le_email_share


Hardly Anyone Wants to Admit America Is Beating Poverty
https://www.wsj.com/articles/hardly-...le_email_share


U.S. Workers Get Biggest Pay Increase in Nearly a Decade
https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-emp...le_email_share


Employers Eager to Hire Try a New Policy: ‘No Experience Necessary’
https://www.wsj.com/articles/employe...le_email_share


The Canard About Falling Incomes
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-can...le_email_share


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
Or should we leave things be as they are and let our current system of capitalism do its thing?
Capitalism is the greatest force for good yet invented by Mankind. Around the world, capitalism has brought more people out of abject poverty than any other system devised. Closer to home, the US middle class is doing very well and is not recovering from the horrendous anti-business policies of the prior administration.

What about the very poor?

Poverty has declined significantly over the past 50 years. Those who disagree ignore data because they don't like what it shows.

Some argue that the official poverty measure from the US Government indicates little improvement since the early 1970s. But this measure is misleading.

First, over the past 40 years America’s safety net has shifted substantially towards in-kind programs such as SNAP (food stamps) and housing benefits, and towards tax expenditures such as the Earned Income Credit while shifting away from traditional cash-transfer programs (live checks). It turns out the US "Official Poverty Measure" doesn't count in-kind assistance or tax expenditure programs.

Second, the official poverty measure relies on incomplete survey data. Americans are less willing today to take the time to respond accurately to government interviewers. For example, the official poverty survey registered only half of the cash welfare the government actually paid out.

Third, the official measure accounts for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers, or CPI-U, a benchmark that does not accurately reflect the influence of new consumer products, changes in the quality of goods, or the shift to low-cost stores. While such errors in accounting for inflation have only a small effect on changes from one year to the next, they accumulate over decades and substantially alter long-term trends.

If, instead of focusing on reported incomes, you evaluate poverty based on actual consumption, you get a much better picture. So look at what food, housing, transportation and other goods and services people actually purchase and consume. The data clearly shows that there is much, much less material deprivation than there was decades ago.

For example, according to the American Housing Survey, the poorest 20% of Americans live as the middle class did a generation ago as measured by the square footage of their homes, the number of rooms per person, and the presence of air conditioning, dishwashers and other amenities.

It still sux to be dirt-poor compared to being wealthy, but life is unquestionably getting better for the bottom quintile. It is unquestionably getting better for the middle-class as well.
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Old Yesterday, 10:09 AM
 
560 posts, read 132,706 times
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It just makes the fall that much more painful.
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