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Old 06-18-2019, 07:07 AM
Status: "Excited to move to Vegas!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Beaverton, OR
5,530 posts, read 5,897,134 times
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^Certainly a nice luxury.

Most of the people I know who have long since not had to work still continue to run their companies. That may be the funniest part of all is the “working class” yearns not to work anymore and thinks that would be The Good Life, but those living the good life are the ones who love what they do and no longer do it for the money but for the sense of purpose it provides and because it’s just fun to be great at something.

We’re pretty lucky everyone doesn’t just quit their work the second they have just enough to retire or we would be even shorter on doctors and entrepreneurs lol.
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Old 06-24-2019, 05:25 AM
 
39,213 posts, read 20,334,087 times
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J. Henslin have proposed class systems with six distinct social classes. These class models feature an

- upper or capitalist class consisting of the rich and powerful,
- upper middle class consisting of highly educated and affluent professionals,
- middle class consisting of college-educated individuals employed in white-collar industries,
- lower middle class composed of semi-professionals with typically some college education,
- working class constituted by clerical and blue collar workers whose work is highly routinized,
- lower class divided between the working poor and the unemployed underclass.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social..._United_States
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Old 06-24-2019, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,726 posts, read 26,748,770 times
Reputation: 20346
Quote:
Originally Posted by petch751 View Post
J. Henslin have proposed class systems with six distinct social classes. These class models feature an

- upper or capitalist class consisting of the rich and powerful,
- upper middle class consisting of highly educated and affluent professionals,
- middle class consisting of college-educated individuals employed in white-collar industries,
- lower middle class composed of semi-professionals with typically some college education,
- working class constituted by clerical and blue collar workers whose work is highly routinized,
- lower class divided between the working poor and the unemployed underclass.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social..._United_States
Interesting concept. What do you do about those that have no education past high school, have built blue collar businesses and are now have a net worth in the 7 and 8 figures or higher?

What do you do about the no college educated kid that developed an app that they sold for millions and now is investing that money into other business opportunities?

The problem I see is with the college education or lack of a college education. Plenty of people with Masters degrees that are barely getting by. They are not in the upper middle class income range. Why should they be included in the upper middle class?
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Old 06-24-2019, 04:56 PM
 
25,972 posts, read 32,962,923 times
Reputation: 32148
Quote:
Originally Posted by petch751 View Post
J. Henslin have proposed class systems with six distinct social classes. These class models feature an

- upper or capitalist class consisting of the rich and powerful,
- upper middle class consisting of highly educated and affluent professionals,
- middle class consisting of college-educated individuals employed in white-collar industries,
- lower middle class composed of semi-professionals with typically some college education,
- working class constituted by clerical and blue collar workers whose work is highly routinized,
- lower class divided between the working poor and the unemployed underclass.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social..._United_States
You’d need to remove “College educated” out of those descriptions. Too many successful wealthy folks out there that have no college degrees.
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Old 06-25-2019, 11:18 AM
 
90 posts, read 19,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
You’d need to remove “College educated” out of those descriptions. Too many successful wealthy folks out there that have no college degrees.
Too many? What percentage of people in the United States with a net worth over $1M (not including primary residence) don't have a college degree? Just because you hear about some random tech millionaires or celebrities on the news doesn't mean it's the norm.

https://qz.com/969659/despite-the-my...have-a-degree/
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Old 06-25-2019, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,448 posts, read 3,754,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
Interesting concept. What do you do about those that have no education past high school, have built blue collar businesses and are now have a net worth in the 7 and 8 figures or higher?

What do you do about the no college educated kid that developed an app that they sold for millions and now is investing that money into other business opportunities?

The problem I see is with the college education or lack of a college education. Plenty of people with Masters degrees that are barely getting by. They are not in the upper middle class income range. Why should they be included in the upper middle class?
You can be a "professional" without a college degree.

Those people would be exceptions to the rule though, since the stats are clear as to how well people with high school only perform in general vs. college educated in general.
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Old 06-26-2019, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,726 posts, read 26,748,770 times
Reputation: 20346
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
You can be a "professional" without a college degree.

Those people would be exceptions to the rule though, since the stats are clear as to how well people with high school only perform in general vs. college educated in general.
I agree. Some people are meant to excel and do so without a formal education. I know people in the trades that make six figure incomes and have at best a high school diploma, but they spent four or five years learning a trade. I know a welder that makes $300,000 a year. I know a Safe Technician that makes $500,000 a year. These are outliers at best though. Many of our high earning non educated staff are in some kind of trade. We have people making $30, $40, $50 an hour but they know how to do something of value.
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Old 06-26-2019, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
9,551 posts, read 10,296,142 times
Reputation: 13350
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
. I know people in the trades that make six figure incomes and have at best a high school diploma, but they spent four or five years learning a trade. I know a welder that makes $300,000 a year. I know a Safe Technician that makes $500,000 a year. These are outliers at best though. Many of our high earning non educated staff are in some kind of trade. We have people making $30, $40, $50 an hour but they know how to do something of value.

My father only completed 11th grade before he dropped out of HS. He later completed the GED but that was a struggle. However, he was able to get into the electrical trade and excel at it later starting his own business and having a number of successful years. He can't spell "receive" or "automobile" properly, but he owns a nice house in an affluent boston suburb outright, a brand new paid off truck and motorcycle, and vacations abroad each year.

A lot of "educated" people strive to achieve that sort of lifestyle (myself included) but often times look down on the "working with hands vs mind" aspect of blue-collar vs white-collar life.
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Old 06-26-2019, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,448 posts, read 3,754,329 times
Reputation: 9257
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonMike7 View Post
My father only completed 11th grade before he dropped out of HS. He later completed the GED but that was a struggle. However, he was able to get into the electrical trade and excel at it later starting his own business and having a number of successful years. He can't spell "receive" or "automobile" properly, but he owns a nice house in an affluent boston suburb outright, a brand new paid off truck and motorcycle, and vacations abroad each year.

A lot of "educated" people strive to achieve that sort of lifestyle (myself included) but often times look down on the "working with hands vs mind" aspect of blue-collar vs white-collar life.
I don't know anyone who puts people like this down. Quite the opposite, they usually get quite a lot of respect. I can't put together Ikea furniture... I literally put a bookshelf together backwards once.

So I respect anyone with spatial or mechanical intelligence.

I will stress again, however, that they are exceptional people. On average, a college degree educated person is going to do better than one without.
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Old 07-01-2019, 10:41 AM
 
3,934 posts, read 3,257,479 times
Reputation: 11277
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
I agree. Some people are meant to excel and do so without a formal education. I know people in the trades that make six figure incomes and have at best a high school diploma, but they spent four or five years learning a trade. I know a welder that makes $300,000 a year. I know a Safe Technician that makes $500,000 a year. These are outliers at best though. Many of our high earning non educated staff are in some kind of trade. We have people making $30, $40, $50 an hour but they know how to do something of value.
All work has value.. It's the rarity of skill that compels higher wages. When the trades were mostly unionized, the boss had to pay union scale, from the apprentice level through journey level. But then the trade schools began, and the bosses were becoming invested in their own unions (trade associations) which then coupled with the state sponsored schools in order to create a larger pool of skilled potential labor.

That construct, tied to labor saving techno advances in the trades, became the harbinger of bad times for blue collar labor. The modern day notion of education as a path to a better life had spread from the university campus to the machining centers, steel mills, and other manufacturing sectors in America, but, it has also resulted in a dilution of that skill rarity at a time of too few jobs. In his 1994 book, titled, The End of Work, Jeremy Rifkin wrote about what he called, a "requiem for the blue collar." Between the reality of cheap foreign labor and the advancing march of machine technology, the trades were looking less and less like their old selves, and now were something that youth should avoid. Yeah some trades do pay well, but the bosses are working hard to remedy that.
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