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Old 04-28-2019, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, NYC
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Isn't working class more or less the middle class?
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Old 04-28-2019, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
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No idea. I'm a member of the "retired class". It means I get paid lots of money to do absolutely nothing.
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Old 04-28-2019, 11:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gasolin View Post
Isn't working class more or less the middle class?
I'd argue the opposite. "Middle class" is broadly college-graduates who are employed in fields requiring a college education - not as merely token qualification, but as being essential to the field. For instance, one could in principle be a practicing electrical engineer, working on design of power-distribution systems, without formal post-graduate education. But starting in the second half of the 20th century, this would be highly unusual. And by "college" I mean a university of some selectivity and prestige - which is to say, the flagship state university, and above.

"Middle class" also means a modicum (appropriately enough!) of stability and mentorship during one's upbringing, where parents instill in their children a quiver of values that come to shape - unwittingly or not - class identity. In contrast, the "working class" had little such advantage in childhood, or it was directed instead towards valuing practical survival.

A middle class can not be the majority in a stable society. It implies a level of comfort and well-placed security, for which it is inevitable to have a large majority underneath it, whose lives are rather less secure and more troublesome. Numbers are slippery and elusive, but broadly, I would say that in modern America, the "middle class" begins at something like the 70th percentile, and ends at the 95th. That is, 70% of Americans are below middle-class, where of course "below" is a curt and simplistic adjective, but a convenient one.
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Old 04-28-2019, 11:38 PM
 
988 posts, read 479,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
In his book titled, "Class, a guide through the American status system" author Paul Fussel pokes fun at the notions we have about our social ranking amid the myriad of Madison Avenue's attempts to sell the idea of class mobility. He classifies the lumpenproletariat in terms of high, middle and low, the higher ranking proles are those who seek a pretentious facade of gated community living, while the low proles are struggling to properly fit themselves in a suit, and dining choices range between KFC and Applebee's.

It's a tongue in cheek treatment of our American fetish with social class and how that all plays out in the daily lives of a decidedly socially insecure populace. Working class, the term itself speaks to the fact of a delineation between workers and those who are beyond the bounds of work as a necessity. The low, middle and high separations between those in the working class produces much more anxiety than any aspirations having to do with rising beyond working class.

I was taught in Public schools that we had no real class system here in America, and I believed that, up until I worked at the local country club. It was there that I got my education regarding the fact of class as a very real divide. At any rate, class remains as a culling factor in all kinds of social considerations, your job, your education, your address, and yes, even your physique. The old adage that one can never be too rich or too thin still exists as an upper class mantra.

Being overweight, and under-educated, is a sure ticket to low prole-ville where the notions of class anxiety or wondering which fork to use, is seldom expressed. And in that realization, we discover an underlying current of anxiety in those who seek to bear all the accouterments of upper class signaling. The high proles are often desperate in their attempts to set themselves apart, driving too much car, living in an ostentatious home, flashy dress, and practicing their pretensions, as though their lives depend on it. But most of us have heard the old saying, "rich and wrinkled, pressed and poor.." People can make outlandish attempts at rising above their notions of class--but-- If you work, for yourself, or others, you are working class...

A lot of us still believe that America's melting pot was forged at Ellis Island, and that erroneous notion gave rise to that idea of America as a classless society, but James Gray had it right in his observations on American class:

"At Ellis Island, I mean, you didn't go there if you arrived in first class. It was only the poorest, the people in the worst shape."
What’s the thinking behind the weight thing? When I worked on Wall St, a colleague, a tall male who was probably 275 lbs or so, was told by his mentor that he needed to lose 50 lbs to advance in management. As a female I thought if being 50 lbs overweight is bad, imagine what being female means.
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Old 04-29-2019, 12:37 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I'm a member of the "retired class". It means I get paid lots of money to do absolutely nothing.
As it should be.

That is what you worked hard all your life for.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:42 AM
 
13,318 posts, read 7,014,958 times
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Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
No idea. I'm a member of the "retired class". It means I get paid lots of money to do absolutely nothing.
How is that different from your Alaska state worker job that got you the big pension?
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Old 04-29-2019, 07:03 AM
 
11,582 posts, read 21,122,047 times
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Working class to me is those who have to work for someone else for an income. Regardless of type of work. If you own significant income producing assets such as Real Estate or oversee a business, that is not working class. I would view "significant" as anything producing the median household wage or above for your area.

Not a definition you'd find in a textbook, just my own.
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Old 04-29-2019, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,835 posts, read 3,494,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C24L View Post
Hello everybody,
What exactly does "working class" mean?Does it mean people who work for a living?Or does it mean people that did not go to college and work blue collar jobs?Can it mean both?Thanks in advance.
Work at a dead-end job.
Hate your job.
Call anyone who advances at your job a suck-up or ass-kisser.
Blame others for everything wrong in your life (if you're white, blame minorities; if you're a minority, blame other minorities and whites).
If you vote at all, vote for anyone who promises to raise taxes on the rich.
If you vote at all, vote only for people from your own ethnic group.
Criticize your children.
Criticize your children's teachers.
Criticize your children's coaches.
Hate bankers.
Hate landlords.
Hate college professors.
Tell everyone that everything is worse than it used to be.
Buy lots of lottery tickets and when you win $100 get drunk.
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Old 04-29-2019, 07:34 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
16,624 posts, read 19,147,254 times
Reputation: 12235
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
Work at a dead-end job.
Hate your job.
Call anyone who advances at your job a suck-up or ass-kisser.
Blame others for everything wrong in your life (if you're white, blame minorities; if you're a minority, blame other minorities and whites).
If you vote at all, vote for anyone who promises to raise taxes on the rich.
If you vote at all, vote only for people from your own ethnic group.
Criticize your children.
Criticize your children's teachers.
Criticize your children's coaches.
Hate bankers.
Hate landlords.
Hate college professors.
Tell everyone that everything is worse than it used to be.
Buy lots of lottery tickets and when you win $100 get drunk.
Damn. That's mean.
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Old 04-29-2019, 07:42 AM
 
10,844 posts, read 8,254,870 times
Reputation: 27137
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
In the United States, “working class” refers to people who do blue collar jobs and are not college-educated. It is usually a label given to whites and not so much blacks or Hispanics.

That makes it a little strange because there is almost no white working class where I live in the DC area.
Huh? What would you call Black or Latino people who do blue collar jobs and are not college educated?
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