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Old 05-06-2019, 01:01 PM
 
69,810 posts, read 70,405,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Because I don't think he knows what he's doing & the long term effects could be severe.

I regard the stock market as having been a flatline for 1.5 years. The Dow has been floating at this 25-26k level since January 2018. I've only been making money off of dividends since then; stocks are flat.

As for unemployment, that's nice, but that is not "all that matters."
if stocks are flat and have no appreciation then your total return would be zero with dividends ... the stocks must appreciate at least as much as the div payout to see any return at all. flat means they are at the same level they were set back to after payout ..

 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:01 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
16,783 posts, read 19,193,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Because I don't think he knows what he's doing & the long term effects could be severe.

I regard the stock market as having been a flatline for 1.5 years. The Dow has been floating at this 25-26k level since January 2018. I've only been making money off of dividends since then; stocks are flat.
The S&P 500 hit a record high on Friday. That is not exactly "flat."

In any case, 1.5 years is not an adequate period for assessment for making any conclusions about the economy. Try 5 years or 10 years, at least.

Don't worry about what "could" happen or what "should" happen. Don't listen to any self-proclaimed "experts."

Just focus on what actually is.
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:09 PM
 
4,252 posts, read 1,024,435 times
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Guess the market shrugged it off. Down 47 on the DJIA now.
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,345 posts, read 3,662,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grlzrl View Post
Guess the market shrugged it off. Down 47 on the DJIA now.
We've seen this movie enough times already. Trump says something stupid, the market takes a few hours to realize that the president doesn't actually have the power to do the stupid thing he said.

What would cause the market to go haywire would be if Trump got his low-qualified Fed nominees confirmed, like Herman Cain or Stephen Moore - they would vote to lower interest rates to zero for kingdom come.
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,345 posts, read 3,662,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The S&P 500 hit a record high on Friday. That is not exactly "flat."

In any case, 1.5 years is not an adequate period for assessment for making any conclusions about the economy. Try 5 years or 10 years, at least.

Don't worry about what "could" happen or what "should" happen. Don't listen to any self-proclaimed "experts."

Just focus on what actually is.
In which case, we shouldn't be giving Trump much credit, should we?

There is nothing in the world that could get me to approve of Trump. He could give me a million dollars and a free night with Ivanka at Mar-a-Lago, I would still be against him.
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,345 posts, read 3,662,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The S&P 500 hit a record high on Friday. That is not exactly "flat."

In any case, 1.5 years is not an adequate period for assessment for making any conclusions about the economy. Try 5 years or 10 years, at least.

Don't worry about what "could" happen or what "should" happen. Don't listen to any self-proclaimed "experts."

Just focus on what actually is.
I did not start investing until late 2017. It's flat to me.
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,345 posts, read 3,662,999 times
Reputation: 9036
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
if stocks are flat and have no appreciation then your total return would be zero with dividends ... the stocks must appreciate at least as much as the div payout to see any return at all. flat means they are at the same level they were set back to after payout ..
My total return is almost exactly 0.0% considering the international and small cap parts of my portfolio are down anywhere from 3-12%. The dividend focused shares I have are actually among the best performers (BX, VIGI, SPYD). Large Cap is also doing well. Rest is flat.
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:32 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
16,783 posts, read 19,193,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
I did not start investing until late 2017. It's flat to me.
So, it sounds like you’re fairly young or maybe just got a late start investing.

Give it more time, like 5 years, 10 years or 20 years. The fruits of investing happen slowly and become significant over time. That’s the way it’s always been.
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:33 PM
 
69,810 posts, read 70,405,688 times
Reputation: 47496
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
My total return is negative considering the international and small cap parts of my portfolio.
i was only refering to your comment about the dividends being your only return when the stocks are flat ... that can't happen because to see a return from a dividend the stocks must appreciate at least as much as the payout or total return is zero . each payout is offset by a matching automatic drop in price so markets have to pull the share price back up to see any return . if you have no appreciation in the stock the dividend cancels itself out and is zero total return . .
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,345 posts, read 3,662,999 times
Reputation: 9036
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
So, it sounds like you’re fairly young or maybe just got a late start investing.

Give it more time, like 5 years, 10 years or 20 years. The fruits of investing happen slowly and become significant over time. That’s the way it’s always been.
I'm 36. Never had extra money before a few years ago. I would have like to have invested in my 20s but it was hard to even get a stable job then, much less save. I mainly focused on paying off student & car debt and staying out of new debt.

I'll believe it when I see it... I entered the job market circa 2010 which was traumatizing. I remember sitting next to people who had 20+ years of experience going for the same entry level $35k job I was. I consider myself lucky to have a stable job and think the whole house of cards is going to fall apart at any moment.
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