U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-09-2019, 07:58 PM
 
3,402 posts, read 2,073,972 times
Reputation: 2644

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
I think the biggest problem with Australia is the absurdly high housing costs. I can't understand why a country with so much land would have such high housing costs. It should have the rich world's cheapest housing.
It’s merely in proportion to the overall high COL
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-09-2019, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Australia
891 posts, read 325,888 times
Reputation: 1639
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
I think the biggest problem with Australia is the absurdly high housing costs. I can't understand why a country with so much land would have such high housing costs. It should have the rich world's cheapest housing.
It is only very expensive in the inner parts of Sydney and Melbourne. In cheaper areas the land is often a small component of the cost. Apparently we now how the highest minimum wage in the world and this impacts on the cost of building.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 02:09 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,767 posts, read 2,551,535 times
Reputation: 2978
Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetJustice View Post
The USA is no longer number one in terms of having a competitive economy. That position now belongs to Singapore with Hong Kong at second place and the USA down at number three. Here is an article on it.
https://www.foxbusiness.com/economy/...titive-economy

Anyway, if you look at the list Australia is way down at 18, way down on the list. So even if the USA isn't number one, at least its much higher than Australia which is a good thing. Australia should not be a developed country. Australia doesn't deserve to be a developed country.
If anything this just displays the insane amount of talent in the U.S. Singapore is the equivalent of a large U.S. city, and Hong Kong the same hardly comparable to the U.S. even Australia has less people than the state of California.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 02:12 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,767 posts, read 2,551,535 times
Reputation: 2978
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayo2k View Post
It is known that Asia will lead the world because unlike the West, they do actually work and are not concerned about stupid issues that does nothing but distract people... Look clearelly and the US is still king among the west
All of that work is pointless as they have very Little to show for it on a per capita basis. Something I feel is very often overlooked Asia has 60% of the world's population they SHOULD be leading the world!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 01:31 PM
 
Location: California
654 posts, read 486,491 times
Reputation: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetJustice View Post
The USA is no longer number one in terms of having a competitive economy. That position now belongs to Singapore with Hong Kong at second place and the USA down at number three. Here is an article on it.
https://www.foxbusiness.com/economy/...titive-economy

Anyway, if you look at the list Australia is way down at 18, way down on the list. So even if the USA isn't number one, at least its much higher than Australia which is a good thing. Australia should not be a developed country. Australia doesn't deserve to be a developed country.
I lived in Australia for 6 months. From what I could tell it had the happiest, wealthiest citizens of any country I've been to.

I went to the ER and it cost me $100 out of pocket. My wait time was less than an hour and it was clean.

Australians always had ample time off, affordable college, a high minimum wage, good public transit.

Australia a population that's less than 1/10th of the US. Of course it's "less competitive" due to sheer numbers. They did have a large R&D sector and hard working, educated employees though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Australia
891 posts, read 325,888 times
Reputation: 1639
Quote:
Originally Posted by njbiodude View Post
I lived in Australia for 6 months. From what I could tell it had the happiest, wealthiest citizens of any country I've been to.

I went to the ER and it cost me $100 out of pocket. My wait time was less than an hour and it was clean.

Australians always had ample time off, affordable college, a high minimum wage, good public transit.

Australia a population that's less than 1/10th of the US. Of course it's "less competitive" due to sheer numbers. They did have a large R&D sector and hard working, educated employees though.
I guess you were on a temporary visa if you had to pay at ER. We would be pretty upset if we had to pay $100!

But yes, whinge we may but we have the highest median wealth per capita of a major country last time I checked it. Not sure about happiness index. However I suspect the unexpected return of our current government in the recent election is somewhat an endorsement of the status quo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2019, 08:05 AM
 
1,089 posts, read 477,070 times
Reputation: 739
Countries with a lot tariffs are not competitive economically; that much what we all know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2019, 09:56 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,219 posts, read 19,521,254 times
Reputation: 12961
The thing with Australia is that there is no city there that is anything close to New York City. It would be boring for me to live in a country like that.

The United States, by contrast, has virtually every kind of thing you could want.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2019, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Seattle
606 posts, read 151,213 times
Reputation: 679
I suspect that, economically, there's a point at which too much concentration of wealth becomes anti-competitive. The U.S. is rapidly approaching that point, turning into a service economy with a majority of workers that can scarcely afford the goods they need. The essential elements of a prosperous middle class -- college education, proper housing, and good health care -- are being priced out of reach.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2019, 12:58 PM
 
Location: California
654 posts, read 486,491 times
Reputation: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The thing with Australia is that there is no city there that is anything close to New York City. It would be boring for me to live in a country like that.

The United States, by contrast, has virtually every kind of thing you could want.
Sydney has almost 5 million people and is extremely culturally rich and ethnically diverse. It has great food too. Also much nicer nature and weather than NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top