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Old 06-15-2019, 10:40 PM
 
6,945 posts, read 3,855,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
I don’t understand your question to that poster, so now I have to wonder if I didn’t understand his post. Three what?

I remember when universities attempted to teach ‘critical thinking’ (maybe they still do?) & it doesn’t work. It’s not something you can teach someone; they either have it or they don’t. Many highly educated people do not critically think. Many uneducated people do. Critical thinking is not necessary for educational attainment but it could theoretically make it harder. In fact, I’d bet it does.

There is a reason the group of people considered ‘well educated with status in their community’ are considered to be the most susceptible to government propaganda & therin lies the origin of some of the contempt that other groups seem to have towards them.

I think that Einstein was a good example of both high intelligence & critical thinking capabilities. Yet it couldn’t be said that he ever acknowledged or even desired, any level of social status.
The poster in question stated "I know lots of people with degrees from 3rd tier state schools who aren’t intellectually engaged and who have zero capability for critical thought."

I also have known people like that, as I have met people from the same schools who are definitely engaged and have a huge capacity for critical thought. Likewise I have met people with multiple degrees from what most would consider prestigious universities, some of whom are engaged, some not; some are very good at critical thinking, some hopeless.

I believe we have all met people with varied educational backgrounds and find that their formal education often has no relationship to the abilities the poster cited which is why I questioned what appeared to be an incomplete assessment.
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Old 06-16-2019, 04:54 AM
 
13,872 posts, read 7,381,208 times
Reputation: 25351
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
There seems to be an inconsistency between your first three sentences and your last. Is it possible you left off three more?
What’s the inconsistency?

A college degree these days is mostly focused on a narrow specialty. Unless they’re from an absolutely top university where they then tend to go on to graduate/professional school, liberal arts majors with a broad general curriculum pump gas after they graduate.
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Old 06-16-2019, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Outside US
1,171 posts, read 463,614 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
I keep hearing people throw around the word "educated" to describe people who are rich in some capacity or who are gentrifiers in my area, as opposed to the salt of the earth common people in society.

Does this simply mean one who has a college degree, or does it mean someone who has a college degree from an elite school? I don't consider myself "educated" but I have a degree due to living in a state that has a low cost 4 year college program (not every state has cheap "city" colleges).
"Educated" for many us is having sat in a public Uni (like I did) getting the BA/BS.

Lots of dopes going through the motions, both students and profs.

At about half way through my sophmore year I realized it's up to each person to open and expand their mind and attempt to think critically.

Some do; many don't.

A lot of MA holders are sheep as well.

"education" breeds conformity

A good education after or without Uni or high school is travelling to different country on the ground and meeting and befriending new people.
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Old 06-16-2019, 06:49 AM
 
2,066 posts, read 699,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Returning2USA View Post
"Educated" for many us is having sat in a public Uni (like I did) getting the BA/BS.

Lots of dopes going through the motions, both students and profs.

At about half way through my sophomore year I realized it's up to each person to open and expand their mind and attempt to think critically.

Some do; many don't.

A lot of MA holders are sheep as well.

"education" breeds conformity

A good education after or without Uni or high school is travelling to different country on the ground and meeting and befriending new people.
This. The classic notion of a university education involved learning Latin and Greek, reading the classics, studying philosophy, history, science, etc. I got through a Math degree without studying a bit of history and with only 2 quarters of English (placed out of regular English due to my ACT verbal score). I did take German after taking French in HS, but it was my decision to maintain fluency in both languages, which I still do at age 66. I learned most of what I know of history from my late husband, who was a history buff, from travel, which motivated me to learn more, and from my own independent study.

I find a depressing lack of ability to think critically among my former HS classmates, most of whom have college degrees. It's OK that we disagree on issues- it's a free country- but they blindly repost any idiotic thing on FB that fits their world view without thinking if it makes sense or fact-checking.
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Old 06-16-2019, 07:00 AM
 
25,971 posts, read 32,970,649 times
Reputation: 32148
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
I keep hearing people throw around the word "educated" to describe people who are rich in some capacity or who are gentrifiers in my area, as opposed to the salt of the earth common people in society.

Does this simply mean one who has a college degree, or does it mean someone who has a college degree from an elite school? I don't consider myself "educated" but I have a degree due to living in a state that has a low cost 4 year college program (not every state has cheap "city" colleges).
Pretty sure it means different things to different people.

To me, it does not mean that one has a college degree. It means that one has attained the knowledge in their life to have strong conversational skills, think and apply strong logic, a basic understanding of math and science and language (and yes, grammar - a pet peeve for me), to know how to be approachable, being comfortable in the knowledge that if they don't know the answer to something, that they know how to find it. To think with an open mind, to be able to discuss timely topics and events, to have some creative outlet that they enjoy. And of course, to know that you never stop learning.
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Old 06-16-2019, 07:44 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,219 posts, read 19,521,254 times
Reputation: 12961
Getting a college education may or may not help develop critical thinking skills. Ideally, it should do so if you went through a rigorous program and your professors challenged the students on a regular basis.

These days, however, most people go to college or go on to get professional degrees for the purpose of making more money or advancing in their careers. That is the bottom line.
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Old 06-16-2019, 03:38 PM
 
Location: I live in reality.
1,045 posts, read 957,327 times
Reputation: 1835
When that piece of paper hits your hand! I don't care if you are a 2 year ASN or a diploma RN (not many of them left these days, but I would rather one of them be my coworker on any hospital ward than a high degreed kid that has alphabets letters behind her/his name and ZERO critical thinking skills.
I BE EDUCMACATED.
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Old 06-16-2019, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,003 posts, read 54,493,040 times
Reputation: 66349
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i have no degrees .. but i had a long career as a self taught sales engineer selling and designing control panels for industrial fans and pumps . .... i consider myself pretty educated on certain topics and pretty ignorant in the areas i have no interest
Same here. I'm uneducated according to the people on this thread for whom a four-year degree is the qualification. I did go to secretarial school, which you can look up in case you are too young to know what that was. (Not you, mathjak, I know you're not. )

I moved up in my career by taking on responsibility above my level and then earning the promotion. I also read a lot on subjects that interested me. I have a natural knack for writing and have had a few things published, and the writing also served me well in document preparation in the engineering industry in which I worked all my life. I learned how to translate engineering-ese into English for the people who approve the funding. Since I retired, I've done some part-time work preparing proposals for engineering companies.

At any rate, I retired holding a management position. I was succeeded by my assistant, who has a J.D. By the time I retired I don't think anyone I worked with was aware that I was uneducated.

One of my favorite quotes:

"Strange as it may seem, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and formal education positively fortifies it." Stephen Vizinczey

Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/s...zinczey_400261
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Old 06-16-2019, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,185 posts, read 257,615 times
Reputation: 473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Same here. I'm uneducated according to the people on this thread for whom a four-year degree is the qualification. I did go to secretarial school, which you can look up in case you are too young to know what that was. (Not you, mathjak, I know you're not. )

I moved up in my career by taking on responsibility above my level and then earning the promotion. I also read a lot on subjects that interested me. I have a natural knack for writing and have had a few things published, and the writing also served me well in document preparation in the engineering industry in which I worked all my life. I learned how to translate engineering-ese into English for the people who approve the funding. Since I retired, I've done some part-time work preparing proposals for engineering companies.

At any rate, I retired holding a management position. I was succeeded by my assistant, who has a J.D. By the time I retired I don't think anyone I worked with was aware that I was uneducated.

One of my favorite quotes:

"Strange as it may seem, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and formal education positively fortifies it." Stephen Vizinczey

Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/s...zinczey_400261
Secretarial school is college and many of my classmates went to one called Katherine Gibbs.
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Old 06-16-2019, 09:15 PM
 
1,049 posts, read 217,464 times
Reputation: 1578
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
I keep hearing people throw around the word "educated" to describe people who are rich in some capacity or who are gentrifiers in my area, as opposed to the salt of the earth common people in society.

Does this simply mean one who has a college degree, or does it mean someone who has a college degree from an elite school? I don't consider myself "educated" but I have a degree due to living in a state that has a low cost 4 year college program (not every state has cheap "city" colleges).

Educated means being "woke" and a social justice warrior obtaining numerous advanced degrees in gender studies and angry white male studies while paying $200K+ for your "education."
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