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Old 06-17-2019, 09:17 PM
Status: "Re-edit status" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
4,134 posts, read 1,883,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Actually, that's a good part of it.

Cheese was a minor part of the US diet until a market had to be found for the megatons of it bought up by USDA price support programs. Presto, cheese in/on everything.
Pizza
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Old 06-18-2019, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,125 posts, read 2,994,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Or health care costs could go down. Massive margin for that, plus tear-watered beer for stockholders.
Both reduction in medical costs and increased contributions to Social Security are needed. Collect contributions on all income, with no cap and reduce benefits by means-testing for those with enough assets to not need them. They named it, "Social Security", because it was intended to allow those with limited resources to survive------not so much to provide everyone with a retirement package, whether they needed it or not.
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Old 06-18-2019, 04:49 AM
 
25,971 posts, read 32,970,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Both reduction in medical costs and increased contributions to Social Security are needed. Collect contributions on all income, with no cap and reduce benefits by means-testing for those with enough assets to not need them. They named it, "Social Security", because it was intended to allow those with limited resources to survive------not so much to provide everyone with a retirement package, whether they needed it or not.
I assure you, Social Security does not provide everyone with a “retirement package“. You’re way off base with your suggestions. At least in my humble opinion. You propose to remove the cap and collect what could be an outrageous amount of taxes from those wealthier people, and then completely deny them any benefit of the taxes that they paid? Yeah that’ll fly.

Social Security and Medicare coverage is for all people, not some special disadvantaged class. Everyone pays in, Everyone benefits.Medicaid is there for those in need.

Last edited by ChessieMom; 06-18-2019 at 05:03 AM..
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Outside US
1,171 posts, read 463,614 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh Oh It's Magic View Post
There is plenty of room for improvement, but as long as the legislatures are making the decisions we're doomed.
They will steal from the system until it collapses.
I see it the same, way, 100%.

It's what they've always done.

Anyone who expects them to change is foolishly idealistic and naiive.
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:57 AM
 
368 posts, read 440,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I assure you, Social Security does not provide everyone with a “retirement package“. You’re way off base with your suggestions. At least in my humble opinion. You propose to remove the cap and collect what could be an outrageous amount of taxes from those wealthier people, and then completely deny them any benefit of the taxes that they paid? Yeah that’ll fly.

Social Security and Medicare coverage is for all people, not some special disadvantaged class. Everyone pays in, Everyone benefits.Medicaid is there for those in need.
Yes. Social Security has been means tested for many years possibly from the beginning. Higher income citizens already get back much less of their contribution than lower income ones. The bolded statement is the reason why these programs are still around. If it ever gets turned into a full fledged welfare program ie. no correlation between contributions and benefits that will be the beginning of the end of these programs.

Medicare already has no cap on wages and never has. Higher income taxpayers are means tested and pay additional premiums.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:29 AM
 
121 posts, read 20,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
I remember thinking to myself there should be a scale each would-be customer should stand on prior to being allowed to enter a restaurant.

Nowadays, I shake my head at morbidly obese mothers with overweight 4 year olds at the grocery store, loading the cart up with "food" -- if you could call it that.
True, but like all industries, the lobbyists would be all over that to fail.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,227 posts, read 1,416,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuero View Post
Yes. Social Security has been means tested for many years possibly from the beginning. Higher income citizens already get back much less of their contribution than lower income ones. The bolded statement is the reason why these programs are still around. If it ever gets turned into a full fledged welfare program ie. no correlation between contributions and benefits that will be the beginning of the end of these programs.

Medicare already has no cap on wages and never has. Higher income taxpayers are means tested and pay additional premiums.
Medicare _did_ used to have a cap on wages subject to taxation. Now set at 1.45% on employee wages and 1.45% employer match, with an "additional tax" jump to 2.35% on employee wages over 200k (but that 0.9% increase is not matched by employer) -- it currently has no cap.

From 1966 (first year of the Medicare program) until 1993 (Clinton tax increase), it was 1.45% on employee and 1.45% on employer _with a cap_ at the same threshold as Social Security. I believe the threshold was increased for several years well above the Social Security wage cap before being eliminated completely.

Social Security is taxed at 6.2% on employee wages with a 6.2% employer match, and it is capped by employee gross wages, currently set at 132,900. The cap threshold increases by a COLA every year.
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Old 06-18-2019, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,227 posts, read 1,416,145 times
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My memory was a little fuzzy, so I looked it up here:

https://www.taxpolicycenter.org/site...historical.pdf

The Medicare wage cap was raised in 1990 (the Bush 1 tax increase) and removed legislatively in 1993 (the Clinton tax increase).

For years 1990 and prior (back to 1966, its introductory year) Medicare was subject to the same income cap for taxation as Social Security ($51,300 in 1990, $6600 in 1966).

In 1991, Medicare was subject to an income cap of $125,000

In 1992, Medicare was subject to an income cap of $130,200

In 1993, Medicare was subject to an income cap of $135,000

After 1994 the cap was removed completely.

The "Medicare Additional Tax" (0.9% on employee wages over 200k with no employer match) was instituted in 2013 (included in the ACA "Obamacare" legislation from 2010).
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:17 PM
 
2,066 posts, read 699,344 times
Reputation: 5306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
But I remember the advertising push to create the concept of "after school snacks," the idea that good mothers should stockpile sweet, processed carbohydrates for kids to eat as soon as they got home.
In the 1960s, Mom always had cake or cookies as a snack when we got home from school- and then we'd go outside and play, My 4 siblings and I are all still thin although we have to work harder at it. For us, though, McDonald's was a treat- not something you did several times a week. Mom would occasionally make French fries and doughnuts but that was rare, too- it was time-consuming. I think that we're more sedentary as a population and the processed foods have things our bodies weren't meant to handle- high-fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners, etc. Portion sizes have also increased. Weigh an average chicken breast or Iowa-cut pork chop; it's well over the recommended weight for a serving size. Plates are even bigger than they used to be.

But, closer to the OT:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly Q. Bobalink View Post
Not to evoke the "death panel" discussions that went viral during the early AHCA debates, but we need more inducement for the elderly to enter hospice programs, and greatly increase the availability of physician-assisted suicide.
An insane % of healthcare costs is spent in the last year or so of people's lives. When DH was 78 and diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia they told him chemo had a 3% chance of success. He turned it down, of course. My Mom also turned down treatment when her breast cancer recurred at age 85. Her father, my Grandpa, had a doc who wanted to operate on his stomach cancer when he was 94. I wonder if Medicare would have paid. I do know 4 people who were over 80 and had aggressive cancer treatments- 2 had bone marrow transplants. None survived for more than a year. Neither did Mom, Grandpa or DH but they saved the system a darned fortune and probably had a better quality of life in their last days.

This is an area where I think we should be looking closely at costs and likely outcomes.

Last edited by athena53; 06-18-2019 at 12:26 PM..
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Old 06-18-2019, 02:12 PM
 
25,971 posts, read 32,970,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
Pizza
Meh. I had pizza for lunch today. Leftover from our dinner Sunday night. Pretty good too.
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