U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-18-2019, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,579 posts, read 3,001,676 times
Reputation: 12774

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
Meh. I had pizza for lunch today. Leftover from our dinner Sunday night. Pretty good too.
Sure. Because pizza, virtually unknown in the US before WWII and a specialty restaurant thing until well into the 1960s, has become a universal quick- and takeout food... loaded, when not overloaded, with cheese.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-18-2019, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,227 posts, read 1,416,145 times
Reputation: 1666
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
An insane % of healthcare costs is spent in the last year or so of people's lives. When DH was 78 and diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia they told him chemo had a 3% chance of success. He turned it down, of course. My Mom also turned down treatment when her breast cancer recurred at age 85. Her father, my Grandpa, had a doc who wanted to operate on his stomach cancer when he was 94. I wonder if Medicare would have paid. I do know 4 people who were over 80 and had aggressive cancer treatments- 2 had bone marrow transplants. None survived for more than a year. Neither did Mom, Grandpa or DH but they saved the system a darned fortune and probably had a better quality of life in their last days.

This is an area where I think we should be looking closely at costs and likely outcomes.
Agreed -- people used to "go home to die." Nowadays, these heroic health care interventions are far more common.

Since the taxpayers are paying, I think we should have some say in how these decisions are made. Over 70? No heroics -- just palliative care.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 03:30 PM
 
2,139 posts, read 524,377 times
Reputation: 3731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Actually, that's a good part of it.

Cheese was a minor part of the US diet until a market had to be found for the megatons of it bought up by USDA price support programs. Presto, cheese in/on everything.
It actually goes beyond mere price support.

The USDA has active outbound programs to encourage the use of more cheese in food products you'll find in many parts of the grocery store and in restaurants. For example, the USDA targeted Domino's Pizza to put more cheese on its pies.

Your government dollars at work.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 03:32 PM
 
2,139 posts, read 524,377 times
Reputation: 3731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Both reduction in medical costs and increased contributions to Social Security are needed. Collect contributions on all income, with no cap and reduce benefits by means-testing for those with enough assets to not need them. They named it, "Social Security", because it was intended to allow those with limited resources to survive------not so much to provide everyone with a retirement package, whether they needed it or not.
This thread is about Medicare, not Social Security.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 03:36 PM
 
2,139 posts, read 524,377 times
Reputation: 3731
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
This is an area where I think we should be looking closely at costs and likely outcomes.
I second this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 03:44 PM
 
Location: San Josť, CA
3,264 posts, read 5,781,929 times
Reputation: 3176
I love how the first consideration people typically have when they consider the state of these programs is how to ensure less is given to the citizen, i.e. we need to bump up the age.

I'd first aim to work on maintaining funding while controlling costs since the U.S. has the highest healthcare costs in the world.

Surely those profiteering from this broken system should be the first casualties and not aging Nancy or Harold.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 03:51 PM
 
18,845 posts, read 13,587,446 times
Reputation: 14261
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
It actually goes beyond mere price support.

The USDA has active outbound programs to encourage the use of more cheese in food products you'll find in many parts of the grocery store and in restaurants. For example, the USDA targeted Domino's Pizza to put more cheese on its pies.

Your government dollars at work.


Yeah it was govt dollars who drove that chart

Or possibly something else entirely


https://hbr.org/2016/11/how-dominos-...nvented-itself
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 04:13 PM
 
6,528 posts, read 1,336,586 times
Reputation: 16542
I agree that healthcare costs need to go down, but that would involve making choices that many people would be against. For example, why do some people insist on maintaining the lives of people who have no good quality of life whatsoever and zero hope of ever regaining it?

If, for example, people are actually brain dead or are 98 years old with both advanced dementia and terminal cancer, I think that they should be humanely euthanized. The fact is that seniors 65 and older incur almost twice as much in average yearly medical costs as any other age group. At a certain point, I think the government should just say, "Enough!" to expensive surgeries or life-prolonging treatment unless the person or his/her family can pay for it or the person has private insurance. (Btw, I am 65 and my husband is 62, although although neither of us has had surgery or an overnight hospital stay for any reason in more than 15 years, knock wood.)

https://www.registerednursing.org/he...-costs-by-age/

I am also against providing care for adults who are here illegally except for prenatal care and lifesaving emergency medical treatment (i.e., massive heart attacks, automobile collisions, etc.) and a few other things which would be too numerous to list here (broken bones, for example). If their employers want to pay for their treatment out of their own pockets, fine, but I don't think that adults who are here illegally should have the same benefits as U.S. citizens. (I do, however, think that children should receive healthcare, no matter what the legal status of their parents is.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 04:19 PM
 
6,528 posts, read 1,336,586 times
Reputation: 16542
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
We went to a car race/show this weekend in Petersburg. I just could not believe the percentage of women ( I’m a gal too, but damn) that were obese. I mean...it was crazy. I just don’t understand what the hell has happened to people.
It has been stated over and over again that the poor are more likely to be obese because of their diet. Cheap and easy-to-prepare food is generally much less expensive than whole grains, most lean meats and fresh seafood, fruits, and vegetables. (Our previous food bill for a so-so diet was about $300 a month, while our new healthy diet costs us about $500 a month -- food only, btw, meaning not counting things like soaps, pet food, and wine.)

And, then, there is the fact (??) that some people have led a crusade against 'body shaming', making it okay for people to be fat without feeling bad about themselves. (And, yes, I do agree with not bullying anyone because of their weight, but saying that it is perfectly okay for a 5'5" woman to weigh over 200 pounds or for anyone to weigh over 300 pounds? I don't think so!)

Last edited by katharsis; 06-18-2019 at 04:30 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2019, 04:21 PM
 
20,077 posts, read 11,137,874 times
Reputation: 20120
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
I agree that healthcare costs need to go down, but that would involve making choices that many people would be against. For example, why do some people insist on maintaining the lives of people who have no good quality of life whatsoever and zero hope of ever regaining it?

If, for example, people are actually brain dead or are 98 years old with both advanced dementia and terminal cancer, I think that they should be humanely euthanized. The fact is that seniors 65 and older incur almost twice as much in average yearly medical costs as any other age group. At a certain point, I think the government should just say, "Enough!" to expensive surgeries or life-prolonging treatment unless the person or his/her family can pay for it or the person has private insurance. (Btw, I am 65 and my husband is 62, although although neither of us has had surgery or an overnight hospital stay for any reason in more than 15 years, knock wood.)

https://www.registerednursing.org/he...-costs-by-age/

I am also against providing care for adults who are here illegally except for prenatal care and lifesaving emergency medical treatment (i.e., massive heart attacks, automobile collisions, etc.) and a few other things which would be too numerous to list here (broken bones, for example). If their employers want to pay for their treatment out of their own pockets, fine, but I don't think that adults who are here illegally should have the same benefits as U.S. citizens. (I do, however, think that children should receive healthcare, no matter what the legal status of their parents is.)

We don't have to rush to the hard choices, where there is so much dispute that nothing will ever get done.


There is more than enough low-hanging fruit. There are Tylenol tablets charged at $10 each. There are bags of cotton charged at $30 each.



A few years ago, a Chicago station shopped around the metro for a routine appendectomy and found hospital costs for the same service ranging from $1500 to $250000 within a 10-mile radius.


When my mother had brain surgery, the hospital fitted her with temporary scull protection: A leather helmet that looked much like the old-school leather football helmets. They billed $2000 for that leather helmet.


I looked inside it. The helmet was made in South Korea. Now, I've been to South Korea. I've bought leather goods in South Korea. I know that helmet could not have cost more than $200, shipped.


But I took some pictures of the helmet and too them to a local riding livery shop that made custom leather goods. I asked them for an estimate to make such a helmet. They priced it at $500.


So the hospital charged $2000 for an imported helmet that surely didn't cost over $200 and could have been custom-made locally for $500.


There is a lot of low-hanging fruit in hospital costs before we get to any life-and-death issues.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top