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View Poll Results: Are you better off now in 2019 than you were back in 2009?
Yes, I'm better off 129 81.65%
No. I'm worse off. 18 11.39%
I'm about the same. 11 6.96%
Voters: 158. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-03-2019, 01:33 PM
 
6,463 posts, read 4,063,729 times
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Much better off. We bought our business in 2012 and it's paid off now. Our income has more than doubled since 2009.
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Old 07-03-2019, 02:02 PM
 
25,964 posts, read 32,962,923 times
Reputation: 32145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arktikos View Post
I would imagine that most public sector employees around here are worse off because wages haven't kept up with increases in cost of living.

I voted about the same, although that was a mistake from a strictly economic view because now that I'm retired my income is less than it was while working.
I’m public sector. I’ve had 2.5% raises the last two years. In fact I went back 10 years and was surprised to see that we have averaged about a 2.5% increase each year. We had three years where we went without a raise at all, but they were able to make up for it later. I am much better off today than 10 years ago - my income is 28% higher today, and my retirement accounts have MUCH higher balances. My siblings, neither in public sector, certainly have seen a greater increase than I have. But they don’t have a pension either.

Last edited by ChessieMom; 07-03-2019 at 02:41 PM..
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Old 07-03-2019, 02:50 PM
Status: "Excited to move to Vegas!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Beaverton, OR
5,529 posts, read 5,897,134 times
Reputation: 6294
A conspiracy theorist troll haha but it’s ok because he “reads,” which is evidently now something worthy of praise. I better get going... they’re watching... The Corrupt Ones...
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Old 07-03-2019, 03:31 PM
 
1,152 posts, read 1,059,170 times
Reputation: 1483
That's a tough one. My wife and I got married during the Great Recession just after I lost my job. With her $230K in student loans debt, we had a net worth of -$80K. She's now a partner at a law firm and our net worth is on the plus side largely due to dumb luck with buying real estate at the bottom. I don't feel better off now because I have more financial anxiety given the unprecedented financial moves of the last 20 years, and the lifestyle inflation we've fallen into.

Just about all of our old neighborhoods are definitely worse off than they were 10 years ago. The density is immense, the houses are less kept up, and it's clear that people are struggling all around us. The issue use to be about a lack of jobs during the recession, now it's an issue of cost of living/burnout/mental health/substance dependancy. While we are much better off on paper, I just don't feel it and would rather go back to 2008 when times for me felt simpler. I'm sure most of us wish we had a time machine.
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Old 07-03-2019, 04:43 PM
 
25,964 posts, read 32,962,923 times
Reputation: 32145
LOL. No I definitely don’t wish I had a time machine. At least certainly not to go back to the financial situation I was in years ago. Hell no.
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Old 07-03-2019, 05:07 PM
 
4,793 posts, read 1,207,587 times
Reputation: 3707
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwong7 View Post
That's a tough one. My wife and I got married during the Great Recession just after I lost my job. With her $230K in student loans debt, we had a net worth of -$80K. She's now a partner at a law firm and our net worth is on the plus side largely due to dumb luck with buying real estate at the bottom. I don't feel better off now because I have more financial anxiety given the unprecedented financial moves of the last 20 years, and the lifestyle inflation we've fallen into.

Just about all of our old neighborhoods are definitely worse off than they were 10 years ago. The density is immense, the houses are less kept up, and it's clear that people are struggling all around us. The issue use to be about a lack of jobs during the recession, now it's an issue of cost of living/burnout/mental health/substance dependancy. While we are much better off on paper, I just don't feel it and would rather go back to 2008 when times for me felt simpler. I'm sure most of us wish we had a time machine.
Yeah, I bet most people wish we could go back to 2008 and relive all the fun.
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Old 07-03-2019, 05:22 PM
 
6,599 posts, read 3,736,021 times
Reputation: 13650
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
By every relevant measure, the economy is much, much better off today in 2019 than it was a decade ago in 2019? (The recession officially ended June, 2019).

Of course, that doesn't mean every individual person is better off today than they were a decade ago -- hence this poll. Are you better off now in 2019 than you were back in 2009?
This has to be a joke poll.
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Old 07-03-2019, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,226 posts, read 4,119,698 times
Reputation: 15540
I retired in 2014, so I can't make a direct comparison. I will say we were very well off before retirement and we still are.
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Old 07-03-2019, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,158 posts, read 648,171 times
Reputation: 2244
Yep, way better now. 2009 was the beginning of a spiral downward for quite a few years, 2010 being about the worst. But along the way real estate rebounded here and we sold the old house, paid off our mortgage and got quite a bit of work. Now we're debt free and ready for a modest retirement. It was touch and go there for a little bit.
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Old 07-04-2019, 01:20 AM
Status: "Re-edit status" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
4,131 posts, read 1,883,639 times
Reputation: 3152
Very stressful in 2009. 59/62yo.
Postponed early retirement because our Retirement funds collapsed and the sequence of withdrawals in a depressed economy was not appealing.

2009: I was directly caring for Mom. Periodically checking up on Dad. Breezing by my home daily to check on MIL, FIL, and spectrumed BIL. Wife was still working but under pressure to retire. High expenses.
2019: They all passed away, fairly quickly due to old age. BIL passed from liver cancer discovered very late. Sold home. Able to establish price on bare land and found a cash buyer for it. It's now just us two, in a urban setting, and expenses way down. Retirement investments recovered and increased. Protected retirement Income will be increasing for several more years.
Downside since 2009, decreased mobility, cancer and heart episodes.
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