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Old 08-26-2019, 06:01 PM
 
26,400 posts, read 28,826,552 times
Reputation: 25330

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Quote:
Originally Posted by case44 View Post
First of all, it's a bogus article from a bad source. There is no recession, and millennials have just as much opportunity for success in a growing economy as anyone else. They just have to seek after it.

We don't need to worry about any kind of a downturn any time soon.
I tend to think news article like to play up negative draman. But you're an unhealthy extreme in the opposite direction.

Our economy might look ok on the surface (at least to some), but there are plenty of issues underneath the surface. Unsustainably high health care costs, unsustainably high college tuition (and resultant student loan debts), unsustainable government pensions (as previously mentioned), and high government deficits and debt loads (even in a supposedly good economy) are just a few serious concerns of mine--and that's just off the top of my head.
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Old 08-26-2019, 06:19 PM
 
10,106 posts, read 4,728,369 times
Reputation: 13238
Quote:
Originally Posted by loser prole View Post
Geez, the teacher and foreman must feel like real heels at Thanksgiving dinner.

Also, you don't always have to use an ellipsis. You made a complete sentence. You can use a period or perhaps an exclamation point in this case.

I don't know... it can be... irresistible... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,449 posts, read 657,714 times
Reputation: 3369
How much they earn, how much they spend, how much they owe and how much they have saved all come into play. My millennial is doing very well and so is her husband. I had always told her not to spend more on housing than they could afford on one of their salaries as a hedge against a recession (layoffs). This has become more of a challenge since they moved from Tennessee to Seattle, where housing is so expensive, but I think they could probably still get by on one income for a stretch if they absolutely had to. Not everyone would be in that position, though, since housing has gotten so expensive....particularly in many of the urban areas where young people live. I do think a lot of young people would be vulnerable in another recession.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:17 PM
Status: "Proud American, Always and Forever" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: DMV Area/NYC/Honolulu
12,817 posts, read 6,589,248 times
Reputation: 12356
I earn considerably more than my parents did at my age (I'm a millennial) even accounting for inflation, but also have more debt than they did. Still, I may be better off than they were, but its hard to judge as they had a family at my age, so that changes the calculus of things a bit.

My older sister earns a respectable salary for anywhere but NYC (she lives in NYC, though). She is not better off than my parents were at her age, but she's still getting by. The same for my younger brother.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
703 posts, read 518,853 times
Reputation: 2104
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
There was an earlier thread on this same thing just recently.

I donít think the article holds water given my sons income and mine, at his age. Heís much better off than I was.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
Same here ..all three of our kids and all three of their spouses earn much more then we did
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
An ours similarly, along with their friends and others that we know and work with. I don't know who these millennial are that are in such dire financial condition, we just don't see it.

This forum does not reflect the general population of the United States. The demographics have been posted before which showed that the average city data member is much more educated and makes a substantially higher income than the average United States citizen. The article is correct, for the general population that is.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:40 PM
 
296 posts, read 54,041 times
Reputation: 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by C2BP View Post
Annie Lowrey, staff writer at The Atlantic, is CLUELESS. Any recession, deflation or depression is a BLESSING for Millennials. Deflating Housing prices, Rents, Education and Healthcare cost, food and everything else is a blessing for Millennials. Millennials have no future if this ZIRP SCAM continues. The FED has stolen trillions and trillions of dollars from this generation to spend today and try to avoid Recession, Deflation and Depression. Just wait for a few more years until Millennials catch up what has been done to them and their future. I don't think your retirement is going to be so nice. IF CHAOS wins anything can happen.

Good Luck!
Stagflation does not agree with you, and that's exactly what we are facing.
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Posting from my space yacht.
8,367 posts, read 3,282,824 times
Reputation: 14961
My progeny all have larger space yachts than my own. One even has her own space station. On the moon. Built by Von Neumann nanobots that she programmed herself. She's only 6. I'm very proud of her.
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:33 AM
 
26,378 posts, read 33,390,504 times
Reputation: 33039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie the heartbreaker View Post
This forum does not reflect the general population of the United States. The demographics have been posted before which showed that the average city data member is much more educated and makes a substantially higher income than the average United States citizen. The article is correct, for the general population that is.
In your view - it is correct.
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:42 AM
 
2,812 posts, read 1,821,020 times
Reputation: 6249
That person isn’t very good at writing.
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:42 AM
 
73,086 posts, read 72,913,868 times
Reputation: 50661
i don't pay much attention to any article that talks in terms of straw people .. all my opinions are based on those i personally know . there is nothing in these articles that is my worry .. some may be a concern but nothing is my worry unless it relates to those i worry about . a concern is not a worry
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