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Old 10-09-2019, 07:04 PM
 
900 posts, read 266,603 times
Reputation: 3081

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Quote:
Originally Posted by damba View Post
What a bunch of nonsense.
Let me guess, you are one of the whiners now who thinks illegals are taking away jobs that Americans would be willing to do?
In 1920, Hispanics were about 1% of the population of the United States. Today, they are at 17% (about sixty million). I'm pretty sure large numbers of Germans and Poles didn't spontaneously change races, so they must be coming in from outside the country (I do understand their birth rate is higher, but that doesn't explain that large a jump). African Americans have stayed constant at about 13%. The White population has fallen at about the same rate Hispanics have risen, although the Asian population has increased significantly, as well. The number I cited likely included offspring, who are technically legal because of the 14th amendment (which should be abolished).

Nothing wrong with immigration, as long as immigrants abide by the laws surrounding it, which is not the current situation, a country without borders is not a country at all. Uncontrolled immigration does suppress wages, and anyone who believes that illegals only work as janitors and meat packers is mistaken. The people who should be most concerned about illegal immigration are the most disenfranchised group, which is African Americans.

That said, I'm still not willing to go out with you, I'm not that kind of girl.
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Old 10-10-2019, 06:44 AM
 
10,788 posts, read 12,694,050 times
Reputation: 15345
Unions need to be wary of jobs leaving for non-union places (example the VW plant in Tennessee) or even worse, Mexico.

Unions were needed back 75 years ago, today I think they are borderline "mob like" in strangling businesses with their demands.
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Old 10-10-2019, 12:07 PM
 
Location: equator
4,035 posts, read 1,755,634 times
Reputation: 10042
Labor union or not, why do so many believe that "low-skilled" jobs don't deserve a living wage?

Someone has to do them and no, it can't all be provided by high-schoolers living with mom and dad.

This basic perception going on nowadays, I just can't wrap my mind around it.
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Old 10-10-2019, 12:40 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
29,304 posts, read 63,712,512 times
Reputation: 33766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Labor union or not, why do so many believe that "low-skilled" jobs don't deserve a living wage?
Because those folks can't get a "living wage'" at their office jobs.
Or at least not without putting a LOT of unpaid overtime. Then there's the mediocre (if any) HI benefits.

They resent the power inherent to the organized aspect of organized labor.
The irony is that aside from committing to about $50 a year in latex purchases...
it's the best chance their kids and grands will ever have. Them? It's too late.
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Old 10-10-2019, 01:08 PM
 
4,034 posts, read 1,070,052 times
Reputation: 4681
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I rarely stop by this forum because I usually find what I expect from past visits: sky is falling scenarios, losers worried about "oligarchs", conspiracy theories, grand schemes where a few tax payers make sure the rest can live well without exerting themselves.

I am really disappointed. I expected to see something about the strike and the need for poorly skilled laborers to be paid high incomes. What happened to the American dream where low skilled workers could have great benefits, cradle to grave and be paid 6 figure incomes?

Does anyone see the economic importance of the GM strike?
It is not the first, it is not the last strike that will occur. The company could offshore all operations, but I believe so much PR is tied up in American-produced automobiles that Detroit (as well as other domestic production) and yes, even UAW, are all part of an image that the company chooses to uphold.

It's always GM in the news, despite Ford and FCA being UAW, nothing different there.

The benefits have already been cut for new hires. No pensions, and new top pay is half of what the old heads could make. What else do people want to happen?
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Old 10-10-2019, 01:32 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
29,304 posts, read 63,712,512 times
Reputation: 33766
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
The benefits have already been cut for new hires.
No pensions, and new top pay is half of what the old heads could make.
What else do people want to happen?
They want to see a magic wand waved that can make it all better.
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Old 10-10-2019, 02:53 PM
 
19,146 posts, read 21,138,833 times
Reputation: 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by homelessinseattle View Post
So auto workers are poorly skilled laborers. How kind of you.
I usually don't stop by here because there are a couple of posters who think they are gods gift to the economic/investing forum and have to get the last word on very subject.
What high skills are required to bolt part A to part B?
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Old 10-10-2019, 03:03 PM
 
357 posts, read 162,807 times
Reputation: 819
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrician4you View Post
What high skills are required to bolt part A to part B?
The skills that allow a worker to concentrate on doing the job quickly, properly, and safely every day on a fast moving assembly line. Is that so hard to figure out? There many people in this county that have no mechanical skills at all.
How hard is it to twist a wire nut?
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Old 10-10-2019, 03:07 PM
 
6,609 posts, read 4,968,009 times
Reputation: 13868
As a consumer I do not care about GM's issues, about pay for their execs or for their employees. I want a good car at a good price. That has never happened with GM. The last GM car I owned was a '99 Buick Regal. I got it used for a "station" car. It had low mileage. I drove it only a couple thousand miles a year. Everything broke, another American POS car.

When I buy a Toyota or a Honda, I can count on a well made car that will last. When I buy American I can count on endless problems. At least the American cars are better than they were decades ago when Unions were at their height and endlessly fighting and even sabotaging cars as a show of power. I still remember buying an American car with a heater hose that had been expertly cut so that the coolant let go only after the car had thoroughly warmed up. The dealer's shop had lots of cars in for new hoses.
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Old 10-10-2019, 03:11 PM
 
4,034 posts, read 1,070,052 times
Reputation: 4681
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrician4you View Post
What high skills are required to bolt part A to part B?
Doesn't really matter. Don't worry, with the current UAW agreement, the number of employees than can make over $30/hour at any point in their lives has been capped and can only decrease.

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/u...lled-labor.asp

Unskilled labor is defined as low-wage, proficiency within 30 days, and not needing to operate specialized equipment. Fast food workers and warehouse selectors fall into this category.

Auto workers, by DOL definitions, are considered to be skilled workers due to high pay, long on-boarding process and training, and operating on a high-tech production line. Many people would not agree that an auto-worker is the same as a fully self-sufficient tradesman like an electrician, but that doesn't matter for this purpose. They both fall under "skilled" and there is no finer granularity.

The definitions are both very old and vague. There is now much overlap and ambiguity for new positions created. But this has not changed the description, only influenced the interpretation of it.

There is a third category for "semi-skilled" labor which (again, with its antiquated examples) covers telephone operators, receptionists, and data entry workers.

-

These definitions will undoubtedly leave some unsatisfied and distraught, but it's just how our federal government classifies workers. Nothing more.

Granted, I'd want to work for someone who VALUES my labor and pays employees well. Unfortunately no one could be found, and God made UNIONS.
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