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Old 11-09-2019, 11:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Quotes from article:

“Family farm” is not a synonym for “small farm.” In fact, 90 percent of million-dollar farms were family farms in 2015.

They also account for about 90 percent of farm production."


"Family farms are also not disappearing. In fact, family farms account for about 99 percent of all farms.

Further, the total number of farms in the U.S. has remained stable since the 1980s at about 2.1 million."
Exactly.

I live in farm country. Most of the "corporate farms" that the left and right coasters like to complain about are owned by extended families that incorporated to benefit from incorporation.

These are smart people who send their children to nearby universities to study the business of farming and use of technology. Those children return to take over the family business -yes, it is a business- and make improvements. Part of the improvement is in the achieving of economies of scale which allows them to compete when commodity prices remain low.

I was talking to an employee of a large, incorporated dairy recently. (He married into the family.) They can produce milk for around $1 per gallon less than what it sells for. Their dairies typically house 9,500 cows.

The smaller dairies, usually less than 500 cows, produce milk for $1 per gallon or more HIGHER than the price of milk. Taxpayers cover the difference between the two in that case. But, of course, the champagne liberals complain about the displacement of small dairies by the larger ones, which actually produce a profit in selling milk and don't require taxpayer subsidies.

Last edited by Teak; 11-09-2019 at 11:20 AM..
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Boston
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About 39 percent of the nation's 2.1 million farms receive subsidies, most of it going to the largest producers of corn, soybeans, wheat, cotton, and rice.
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Old 11-09-2019, 04:29 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,485 posts, read 41,085,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skeddy View Post
About 39 percent of the nation's 2.1 million farms receive subsidies, most of it going to the largest producers of corn, soybeans, wheat, cotton, and rice.
And... What% of those crops are consumed by USA taxpayers?

Very, very little, especially if we were not propping up a failed corn ethanol industry. (and pathetic USA biodiesel (made from soybeans, a very bad choice or feedstock, but USA biodiesel is controlled by US Soybean council). So.. as usual, the USA taxpayers are funding foreign aid to countries who prefer to kill us, and funding special interests (lobbyists / ex-politicians). Gaming the proverbial PORK of the system.

Waste of money, efforts, resources, national benefit. (= Lost "Opportunity costs"). Such as "preventing farmer suicides."

Interesting presentation last night on how personal the farm financial crisis is. 4-5th generation farmers losing what there predecessors sacrificed much for. (Our family homestead has been at financial risk 3x since 1869, many of us have given much to preserve it. Can next generation sustain it???.

Farming is in your blood and DNA, and often you have had your nose to the grindstone too long to be employable in a different career. Nor are there jobs in the boonies to replace your livelihood. Farmers and ranchers don't integrate well into cities and suburbia. They are not keen sitting in traffic (wasting time). Or the trivial necessities of being a city person. ( Oogling over you neighbor's pesky yapping (non-working) dog.). Stuff you have on a farm has a purpose, no time for fluff. (Dogs, or dresses, or discussion (bosses).

I suspect there is and will be increased trucker suicides with upward employment and cost pressures. That career is not keen on bosses either. (Wasted time @ annual evaluation)
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Old 11-10-2019, 12:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pittsflyer View Post
Thete are different levels of mechanization and moving up that chain involves massive step changes unless the farmer is also an engineer and machinist.
Couldnt they just go to the convention and see what tech engineers are peddling, and then buy from them. I sure the vendors will offer warranties and tech service for the tech they peddle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Farming is in your blood and DNA, and often you have had your nose to the grindstone too long to be employable in a different career. Nor are there jobs in the boonies to replace your livelihood. Farmers and ranchers don't integrate well into cities and suburbia. They are not keen sitting in traffic (wasting time). Or the trivial necessities of being a city person. ( Oogling over you neighbor's pesky yapping (non-working) dog.). Stuff you have on a farm has a purpose, no time for fluff. (Dogs, or dresses, or discussion (bosses).

I suspect there is and will be increased trucker suicides with upward employment and cost pressures. That career is not keen on bosses either. (Wasted time @ annual evaluation)
Perhaps they can work at one of the corporate farms.
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Old 11-10-2019, 03:04 AM
 
7,308 posts, read 3,268,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Couldnt they just go to the convention and see what tech engineers are peddling, and then buy from them. I sure the vendors will offer warranties and tech service for the tech they peddle.



Perhaps they can work at one of the corporate farms.
Price points. Going from a basic tractor to a massive mechanization involved BIG $$$$$.
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Old 11-10-2019, 11:25 AM
 
5,803 posts, read 3,096,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Its mostly machines, or poor illegals doing the hard work though, not the owners.



But the subsidies been around for a long time. They are quite substantial too. Or are you saying none of the subsidies have ever been remitted?



True, but this industry is being subsidized by what is seemingly a lot of money. Plus, they are growing food. If that is not stable enough industry or an enough of an in-demand product, than what else is? You think farms be last to go in any economy since what is the point of an economy other than to eventually buy food.

True but food production is considered a strategically protected industry. In case of another world war type scenario it is critical that we can produce enough food to self sustain. It also helps to diversify the food sources based upon type and region so if there are other factors that impact (global warming/drought).


Out of all the government intrusions our farming/food subsidies is one of the smaller concerns for me.
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:28 PM
 
6,916 posts, read 6,759,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsflyer View Post
Price points. Going from a basic tractor to a massive mechanization involved BIG $$$$$.
I have not been on a farm, or seen the operations on TV for a while, but how more mechanized can you get from the tractor/vehicle that goes around and picks up the plants?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
It also helps to diversify the food sources based upon type and region so if there are other factors that impact (global warming/drought).
From what I gathered, most farmers in much of the fertile areas like the Midwest are mono culture farmers. Many focus on corn for feed, or soybeans or any other single crop.
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Old 11-11-2019, 02:36 AM
 
7,308 posts, read 3,268,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
I have not been on a farm, or seen the operations on TV for a while, but how more mechanized can you get from the tractor/vehicle that goes around and picks up the plants?



From what I gathered, most farmers in much of the fertile areas like the Midwest are mono culture farmers. Many focus on corn for feed, or soybeans or any other single crop.
I watched it once on history channel and the big farms have these massive machines that have a little joy stick, I can’t imagine that these machines were less than half a million bucks possibly much more. Granted a lot goes into these machines but most farms can’t absorb that cost.

Unless the farmer is an inventor and can build out the tech himself.
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Old 11-11-2019, 08:13 AM
 
5,803 posts, read 3,096,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
I have not been on a farm, or seen the operations on TV for a while, but how more mechanized can you get from the tractor/vehicle that goes around and picks up the plants?



From what I gathered, most farmers in much of the fertile areas like the Midwest are mono culture farmers. Many focus on corn for feed, or soybeans or any other single crop.
Well from where I’m from it’s the Orange groves and big sugar that reap huge federal subsidies while polluting the watershed. From there the water gets released into the gulf and atlantic via rivers “canals” which in turn causes huge algal blooms called red tide that kills huge amounts of the fish and wildlife populations in SWFL.

https://www.greenpeace.org/usa/wp-co...-dsc03650.jpeg

https://i.redd.it/o485zrhsald11.jpg
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Old 11-12-2019, 03:51 AM
 
4,360 posts, read 1,998,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
I have not been on a farm, or seen the operations on TV for a while, but how more mechanized can you get from the tractor/vehicle that goes around and picks up the plants?



From what I gathered, most farmers in much of the fertile areas like the Midwest are mono culture farmers. Many focus on corn for feed, or soybeans or any other single crop.
To the first quote; not to be rude but it's clear you don't have any real world understanding of farming and it's too broad a subject for anyone to be educated on with some typing on CD or anywhere else.
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