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Old 11-13-2019, 11:45 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,351 posts, read 3,422,355 times
Reputation: 8746

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So, I admit, I'm not careful with credit and have overlimited a credit card. But....There's good news. Because I was overlimit, the powers that be wisely thought I shouldn't go deeper. So there's no charges permitted on my account and then I get an email stating "Hey this company tried to bill you and we said no"

Needless to say I was stunned. It's not a company I know of, ever dealt with and have NO clue as to how they got my CC info. The amount was small $11.98 but the fact that my card is over limit I'd possibly never had seen it, and accepted it without a whimper (or complaint)



So, called the credit issuer, we have closed the account and they're sending a replacement. They are also opening an investigation as to how they got it and are looking into the company trying to bill me. They promise to let me know the details if they can. I'm just stunned that I've been careful enough, but obviously I'll have to go major care when using my CC online. Yes, in short this ends as of today.... Next time I do an online purchase, I'll use a paid for credit card as my bank and not use my personal credit cards online anymore.

Only takes one close call to wake me up...
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,937 posts, read 16,460,876 times
Reputation: 8231
It's not necessarily an online hack- I've had to replace a number of credit cards where the point of theft was gas station credit card readers. Those skimmers are somewhat common in my part of Florida.
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:09 PM
 
6,424 posts, read 1,686,007 times
Reputation: 5233
YOu don't have to pay fraudulent card purchases if it's on credit. Your bigger issue is you have maxed out your credit card. I would work on that if I were you.
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:16 PM
 
1,267 posts, read 583,653 times
Reputation: 1397
As another example of non-online issues there are plenty of stories of waiters/waitresses taking CC info when they take your card away from the table. Just keep checking your statement periodically, no need to discontinue using your everyday credit card.
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,937 posts, read 16,460,876 times
Reputation: 8231
People who buy stolen credit cards will often put a bunch of small charges onto their 'new' card to see if a larger purchase is likely to go through later. The last time I had a card number stolen, I learned about it by American Express' fraud department calling me and asking if I'd made about 20 purchases of $3 or less from itunes, amazon.com, Steam, google play, etc at 5 in that morning followed by $10 at a Tim Horton's in the Greater Toronto Area. (apparently even criminals in Canada need their Timmie's)
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:51 PM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,351 posts, read 3,422,355 times
Reputation: 8746
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuiteLiving View Post
As another example of non-online issues there are plenty of stories of waiters/waitresses taking CC info when they take your card away from the table. Just keep checking your statement periodically, no need to discontinue using your everyday credit card.
Except this card has never been used in a restaurant. And the charge was from some collection company. I have heard of this being done and they said that they would charge a small amount to "Sneak by" the owner so they wouldn't get suspicious.
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:53 PM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,351 posts, read 3,422,355 times
Reputation: 8746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grlzrl View Post
YOu don't have to pay fraudulent card purchases if it's on credit. Your bigger issue is you have maxed out your credit card. I would work on that if I were you.
Got hit with a higher than expected auto renewal fees and so the card company then afterward tacked on their interest charges. But the good news is they don't charge for going over limit, just for being late... But this post wasn't about that, it was about this seemingly small charge that WAS fraudulent...
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:55 PM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,351 posts, read 3,422,355 times
Reputation: 8746
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
It's not necessarily an online hack- I've had to replace a number of credit cards where the point of theft was gas station credit card readers. Those skimmers are somewhat common in my part of Florida.
Well, if they can find out, they'll let me know. I have used it for such, but most of the time I use cash as I get a discount of $0.05-$0.10 a gallon
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,655 posts, read 4,434,414 times
Reputation: 19394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
Because INeedless to say I was stunned. It's not a company I know of, ever dealt with and have NO clue as to how they got my CC info. The amount was small $11.98 but the fact that my card is over limit I'd possibly never had seen it, and accepted it without a whimper (or complaint)
You'll probably never know how the thieves got your CC number. But your example shows why you should be carefully checking your card statement at least once a month - to catch fraudulent charges. And it's also a good idea to set up email and text message alerts on your card account so you get notified about online purchases, gas station charges, purchases over a certain dollar amount, etc. 99% of the time those are in fact your purchases, but when they are not it can save you a lot of grief. I've caught fraudulent charges that way which the bank's fraud department hadn't noticed, and had the card shut down and a replacement on the way within minutes of the text message hitting my phone. These days real-time alerts are a necessary precaution.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:09 PM
 
1,267 posts, read 583,653 times
Reputation: 1397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
Except this card has never been used in a restaurant. And the charge was from some collection company. I have heard of this being done and they said that they would charge a small amount to "Sneak by" the owner so they wouldn't get suspicious.
My post was an example to show why your plan to "Next time I do an online purchase, I'll use a paid for credit card as my bank and not use my personal credit cards online anymore".

Online or offline, there's risk no matter what.
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