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Old 08-19-2020, 03:56 AM
 
1,197 posts, read 1,676,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
I much rather live in an area that took the science seriously than an area that denies the effectiveness of masks.

Liberals. Big Cities. Higher Covid risks. Mask wearers.
Conservatives. Small towns. Lower Covid risks. Mask deniers.

Of course just general tendencies.
We are up in Portland from rural AZ for the summer. The above differences could not be more dramatic.
Me too.

Watching my hospital get slammed as the local politicians do nothing has been frustrating.

Thought I looked at all the data to decide where to live after residency, low crime, good schools, well run hospital, decent cost of living. Never thought to look into ability to “science” of the local population, but once this contract is up...

One year then, off to an area that actually values healthcare workers because this is awful.
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Old 08-19-2020, 04:00 AM
 
1,197 posts, read 1,676,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Themanwithnoname View Post
That's true for some.

Others flee the urban areas as soon as they (financially) can, usually in retirement.
Financially speaking doctors make much much more in rural America than they make in the cities, it’s almost an inverse cost of living, especially for primary care and OB.
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Old 08-19-2020, 08:45 AM
 
17,481 posts, read 7,183,667 times
Reputation: 3730
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDrenter223 View Post
Me too.

Watching my hospital get slammed as the local politicians do nothing has been frustrating.

Thought I looked at all the data to decide where to live after residency, low crime, good schools, well run hospital, decent cost of living. Never thought to look into ability to “science” of the local population, but once this contract is up...

One year then, off to an area that actually values healthcare workers because this is awful.
I do believe that you have things a bit mixed up. Or of course your experience may be very different than mine. I just retired, but still keep in contact. And have plenty of time to read about Covid 19 as well as engage in political discussions.

Almost all the recent political hubbub, those not wearing masks, those denying science for instance have nothing against the HC teams and docs. This was recently true in my small conservative AZ town, and is true here in big city liberal Portland, where my daughter practices. It is indeed pathetic IMO, but not generally directed towards us docs out in practice. Though on these sorts of forums you might get some disrespect based on the politics you express. Right now Pandemic related medical opinions of course join much more closely with Dems/liberals. And these truths are very hard for the Right to digest at this point in time.
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Old 08-19-2020, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Flyover part of Virginia
3,041 posts, read 1,617,820 times
Reputation: 4187
The Federal Reserve will do all it can to prop up real-estate values with its endless "stimulus" and "QE," but big city real estate will eventually plummet in value. I think the living conditions in large cities will become so deplorable (due to money, food, resource, and energy scarcity) in the coming years that you won't be able to give away a downtown Manhattan condo.
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Old 08-19-2020, 12:45 PM
 
Location: moved
12,668 posts, read 8,296,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDrenter223 View Post
They are shutdown for a moment. ...

When this is over the cities will still be great, and fly over country will still be fly over country.
Quote:
Originally Posted by flying_pan View Post
Cities have their advantages, and in no way it is going away. Living in the middle of nowhere is the worst nightmare for many, especially born and raised in the cities. ...
Cities indeed have eminent advantages, but "for the moment" there's little difference between some hollow in West Virginia and the most storied cultural-capitals on the planet.

I'm a city-person, who spent nearly 20 years in rural circumstances. And while not "the worst nightmare", it was debilitating and stifling in various ways. Now I'm in the city... and I see much the same isolation and paucity of resources... except that there's higher costs and less personal space.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Shutdown for a moment? NYC has been shut down since mid-March. It's now mid-August. That's 5 months and there is absolutely not end in sight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
I still think roughly 2 years total.
Let's do a calculation. Suppose that the shutdowns reduce quality of life by only 10%. Call that 10% of aggregate life-lost. Now suppose that in a "let it rip" scenario, we sustain 1% casualties (deaths) and another 2% of serious permanent health-debilitations, population-wide. Call that aggregate 3% life-lost. Which is the lesser evil? 3% or 10%? OK, actually it's 3%... because that's over all remaining life-years, but the 10% is over only the interim. But you see the point... as this "interim" gets longer and longer, the lesser-of-two-evils reverse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by capoeira View Post
According to James Altucher "New York City is Dead Forever".
Altucher is notorious for his hyperbole and dramatic flair. NYC isn't "dead". But it's suffering a massive self-inflicted wound. Working-from-home is great for established professionals, who only need to coordinate amongst each other for making decisions. That can be done by Zoom. But what about the younger set? What about new-hires? What about mentorship??? We are despoiling the next generation of opportunities. And you know what? That's our future tax-base. These kids are going to be funding our Social Security someday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
Right now Pandemic related medical opinions of course join much more closely with Dems/liberals. And these truths are very hard for the Right to digest at this point in time.
You do have a point there. But as a left-leaning person - at least by historical standards of this Forum - the pandemic is launching me right into the arms of the hardest of the hard-right.
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Old 08-19-2020, 12:48 PM
 
17,481 posts, read 7,183,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post



You do have a point there. But as a left-leaning person - at least by historical standards of this Forum - the pandemic is launching me right into the arms of the hardest of the hard-right.
And why is that?
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Old 08-19-2020, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
15,496 posts, read 14,389,136 times
Reputation: 28372
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDrenter223 View Post
And mortgages are 30 years, so one of them is a moment.
All mortgages aren't 30 years. Also it's only 30 years if you just got a 30 year mortgage this year. Many people don't have mortgages.

What's happening now is not a moment. It will be ending anytime soon.
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Old 08-19-2020, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
15,496 posts, read 14,389,136 times
Reputation: 28372
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDrenter223 View Post
Financially speaking doctors make much much more in rural America than they make in the cities, it’s almost an inverse cost of living, especially for primary care and OB.
I live in a rural are and doctors are paid up to 50% more to come here. They have to pay that much more to get them to come to rural areas.
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Old 08-19-2020, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
19,628 posts, read 21,837,761 times
Reputation: 16997
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3Guy View Post
People are putting the cart before the horse. Pulling the trigger too soon before they know for a fact WFH will be permanent and job secure. Hellooooo outsourcing!
Outsourcing isn't a big concern to me, I made the move from a job to being a contractor in 2012 so I'm used to that it's not permanent. That can be either long-term or gig. I've done a few longer contracts early on but definitely gig economy now so the income does fluctuate quite a bit.

But yeah, WFH may or may not be permanent. Before it wasn't and I was onsite most days and most of the work is in major urban areas. Most of the people doing it in more rural areas are semi-retired or part-time, just not enough out there to really be full-time. Now it's who knows. Once or twice a month I'm still onsite but I could afford to just lose those jobs or just stay within 100-200 miles and drive in occasionally as needed. Really hard to tell. Location doesn't matter anymore besides licensing. I might have flown down to LA one or two times a year before whereas now it's more like once or twice a week. Doesn't matter if I'm just sitting at home and doing it remotely. But who knows if that's permanent. If I had to guess, I'd say probably 50 percent will stay remote but that's just a complete wild guess. Even then, what's that really mean. If half the workforce decides to go live in some small town with decent Internet access, probably makes more sense to stay put even if half the work does go remote permanently.
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Old 08-19-2020, 01:56 PM
 
16,389 posts, read 14,822,730 times
Reputation: 14776
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
I much rather live in an area that took the science seriously than an area that denies the effectiveness of masks.

Liberals. Big Cities. Higher Covid risks. Mask wearers.
Conservatives. Small towns. Lower Covid risks. Mask deniers.

Of course just general tendencies.
We are up in Portland from rural AZ for the summer. The above differences could not be more dramatic.
I like your posts a lot but this is so broad as to border on insulting.

If you take a look at most big metros and big cities the areas being very hard hit by Covid-19 in most cases are typified by left to very leftwing voting patterns.

FE take a look at hot spots - current and past - in NYC, Northern New Jersey, Dallas, Atlanta, LA etc.
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