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Old 09-07-2020, 05:39 PM
 
18,154 posts, read 6,714,376 times
Reputation: 16120

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteWidow View Post
I always fight with my wife...about "be ready for a rainy day"...."be ready for darker times"......she says, "nah, don't worry, live life"..........I never ever expected a pandemic nor did I ever expect a shutdown...but we always would plan for 2 years of no work....pandemic hit, she did get to sit at home for one week on/one week off from work PAID...not me, I had to work through it...lesson from us, have everything paid off, do not live on credit, do not not carry a needless mortgage if you don't have to....even though we were still going to work...we still changed our habits when the pandemic hit to make sure we are ready in case things get even worse.

Not sure what to feel for the woman...but people need to be ready.
Those values are no longer taught. Now, if you can't afford to live on what you make, it's someone else's fault.
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Old 09-07-2020, 05:40 PM
 
18,154 posts, read 6,714,376 times
Reputation: 16120
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasLawyer2000 View Post
These extremes exist, but are not the norm. We should recognize that there's a very small number of people who are completely careless in regards to their finances.

That being said, this particular person is a victim of physical abuse and is going through a divorce as a result.
Maybe she could have chosen better. I guess the violence didn't start until after she had the second kid, right?
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Old 09-07-2020, 05:46 PM
 
18,154 posts, read 6,714,376 times
Reputation: 16120
There used to be a show on CNBC called Til Debt Do Us Part. It was a woman finance expert who would meet with a couple, get to know them a little, tally up their debt and tell them how to fix it. Sometimes they were successful and sometimes they weren't. But it was clear that in most cases, the damage was self inflicted. And it was also clear that a huge percentage of people live beyond their means and bury their heads in the sand.
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Old 09-07-2020, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Sacramento County
156 posts, read 83,982 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasLawyer2000 View Post
These extremes exist, but are not the norm. We should recognize that there's a very small number of people who are completely careless in regards to their finances.

That being said, this particular person is a victim of physical abuse and is going through a divorce as a result.
Let me sum up all the responses you've gotten and ever will get:

Nah, all poor people are poor because they made big mistakes. You're obviously not a follower of the righteous path of Neo Calvinism, you leftist commie infidel.

Did I miss anyone?

Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
I agree.

So many people are criticizing the mother. Where are the nasty comments about the deadbeat father who hasn't paid any child support for the last seven months? Doesn't the boy's father care that his children are going hungry?
Wait, that's misandry. What are you, some kind of feminist? Holding the father responsible for his kids and baby momma, what is this country coming to nowadays. Damned millennials or something grumble grumble maga maga grumble grumble

^^^ parody of course
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Old 09-07-2020, 06:26 PM
 
Location: equator
10,006 posts, read 5,178,469 times
Reputation: 23461
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
We live in a culture of "live once, live to the most", with zero money management and savings idea, taught to young people for generations. Good for businesses, bad for making it work, when SHTF. Why are you even surprised? Living by debt was norm for how long? Even very smart minds simply can't fathom debtless life anymore.
You think so? We're not very smart, but debt-free. LOL.

As far as divorce, we should all remember that half of marriages end in divorce, so not a lot of judgement room on that topic.
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Old 09-07-2020, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Sacramento County
156 posts, read 83,982 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
It's funny how you just completely ignored this :

that she was a victim of physical abuse by her husband and she’s in divorce proceedings. All of his financial support stopped this January.

They say you should have around 6 month's worth of expenses in Savings so her amount is about $20k.
How many people have that much lying around?
Let's add that she is raising 2 Sons by herself without here derelict husband and has to provide for them by herself.
Okay, you know what, I'm going to put the sarcasm and parody aside and let you know something apparently no one here from the otherwise intelligent side of the thread is aware of:

These people who are yelling about bad spending habits don't care about the fictional bad spending habits that they're ranting about. I hate to break it to those of you who are screaming, and quite correctly so, about this woman's actual circumstances that have zero to do with her alleged runaway consumerism:

The folks you are debating with are economic eugenists.

These posters see poverty as a way of culling the herd, of reducing the population, getting rid of the undesirables. To them poor people are undesirable and instead of calling for sending them to the gas ovens like the Nazis did the Jews, the new prevalent mindset in right wing America is to let them die by legal negligence: "let 'em starve if they can't make it on their own." You can sit here all day - and we all apparently have done this a billion times - debunking the lies, only to see these MAGA goons repeat the same debunked lies in the very next post or thread - but you're not addressing the real problem: when they see poor people, they see people who should soon be dead. That's it. That's all.
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Old 09-07-2020, 06:41 PM
 
8,173 posts, read 3,166,674 times
Reputation: 5751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grlzrl View Post
Maybe she could have chosen better. I guess the violence didn't start until after she had the second kid, right?
Are you speculating or did you ask her? I suggest you ask her or someone more familiar with the case.

I don't know the answers and I'd like to assume that you're better than to make assumptions (maybe I'm wrong?).
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Old 09-07-2020, 06:43 PM
 
8,173 posts, read 3,166,674 times
Reputation: 5751
Quote:
Originally Posted by JobHunter2018 View Post
Let me sum up all the responses you've gotten and ever will get:

Nah, all poor people are poor because they made big mistakes. You're obviously not a follower of the righteous path of Neo Calvinism, you leftist commie infidel.

Did I miss anyone?
Hah, to think someone would call me a leftist.
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Old 09-07-2020, 07:20 PM
 
6,597 posts, read 2,460,869 times
Reputation: 4968
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasLawyer2000 View Post
They do teach finance classes in school. Most private schools have extra-curricular classes that parents can pay for their child to attend. But most of this can also be learned from parents if they are capable.

Why would a college prep class teach personal finance? That makes no sense.
They didn't teach it at any school I attended. The adults in my life didn't discuss such things. It was an "adult matter" they said.
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Old 09-07-2020, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
388 posts, read 507,588 times
Reputation: 1176
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimAZ View Post
You keep trying to make a case that there is minimal inflation for the cost of higher education. I’ll use an example from our own experience, the University of Denver, that shows significant price inflation. DU is a private school, nothing special about it, and certainly not in the higher tier of cost.

2008 — undergrad expenses for a year:$45K
2019 — undergrad expenses for a year:$72K.

A 60% increase over ten years or roughly 5% annually. To their credit in 2008 that rate is what the admissions office told us to expect. The cost of higher ed seems to increase at a rate much higher than the “official” CPI numbers.

First of all, A year's tuition at DU is $53,775, not $72k
You using the inflated figures that add the estimated housing, food, personal expenses to that:
https://www.du.edu/admission-aid/fin...ost-attendance
These expenses would be completely unnecessary if you still live with family


Second.. this is a prime example of one of the main complaints regarding forgiving student loans... Why should loans be forgiven if you CHOSE to go to an obviously more expensive private university (even in your example you stated U of Denver is "nothing special about it")?

University of Colorado, which has a Denver campus, is obviously far more affordable at $12,963!!!
https://www.collegetuitioncompare.co...ate%20students.
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