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Unread 05-10-2012, 11:52 PM
 
14,061 posts, read 3,520,592 times
Reputation: 2465
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodbyehollywood View Post
Well, gee, we already pay a $2.00 delivery fee, then tip the pizza guy a few more bucks, which s/he more than likely doesn't declare on his/her taxes. Deliver 2-3 pizzas an hour and you'll have doubled the minimum wage.

But, hey, that claim for reimbursement of laundering his/her uniform (translate: throwing a cotton polo shirt in the wash with the rest of his/her clothes) is pretty creative. Is there a company in America that pays employees for washing the clothes they wear to work?

The driver does NOT get the delivery charge. The driver DOES usually get a percentage of net delivery sales (I got 6% or 7% at different places when I delivered pizzas years ago) on top of minimum wage.

So if a driver delivers say $300 worth of pizzas on a shift, he might get (based on what I got) $18-$21. This is often called "mileage" or "commission" (and probably a bunch of other things as well) and is intended as compensation for the use of the driver's car.

That's how it usually works in take-out pizza shops. Dine-in restaurants which also offer delivery might do things differently, with results that often aren't good for the drivers.

One of my pizza jobs was at a restaurant with seating, a lot of foot traffic, and close proximity to a college campus. This is a bad setting for a driver. Since most of the sales volume is inside, drivers do a lot of inside work and don't get to deliver many pizzas. (I strongly preferred being on the road to washing dishes and bussing tables.) Since students were notoriously poor tippers, there was little tip potential in my job. (Drivers were not servers, so they did not serve seated diners and thus did not get inside tips.)

On this job, I calculated that considering car costs and lack of tips, I was effectively earning less than minimum wage at that job. My guess (without having read the link yet) is that this lawsuit involves a similar sort of scenario.
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Unread 05-11-2012, 09:09 PM
 
14,200 posts, read 5,275,882 times
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[quote=forgetwhoiam;24056207]I deliver pizzas for Pizza Hut. I think the $16 per hour is not accurate what so ever. We might get to take out 3-4 pizza orders per hour during rush hours, which is from about 12pm to 1:30pm and 5pm to 8pm. So if you are working from 2pm to 5pm there is no way you are leaving there with $16 per hour. Okay, now with the tipping situation, on average, we recieve $2.50-$3.00. The delievery charge that you pay when you order a pizza is $2.50 and the driver only recieves $1.10 of that. Also the average driver only has a 3.5 hour shift, and about 20 hours per week. So let's add this up really quick.

Delivery Driver Pay Rate: $5.25 per hour
Tips (Averaging 3 per hour @ $2.50 per delivery ): $2.50*3=$7.50
Delivery Charge Received (Averaging 3 per hour): $1.10*3=$3.30
TOTAL PER HOUR : $16.05 per hour!
TOTAL PER SHIFT (Assuming It's The Average Shift): $56.18
TOTAL PER WEEK: $321.00

Now before you start screaming at my comment saying oh I was right...now you need to take out the deductions that a driver has because of his job:

The average delievery is between 2-10 miles from the store. So we are going to round to 5 just to keep it simple.

So each hour the driver takes 3 deliveries: 3*5=15.
Average shift & milage/hour: 3.5*15=52.5


So let's take some gas into consideration now. The average car gets around 25 miles per gallon.
So assuming you get 25 mpg you are going to use 2.1 gallons of gas on an average shift.
Now, in Missouri, gas is at $3.65 per gallon. So after one night the driver will spend $7.67 in gas alone.

Time for some more math:
Pay Per Hour: $16.05
Gas Used Per Hour: $7.67
Total Pay (After Gas Expense) per hour: $8.38
Pay Per Week (After Gas Expense): $167.60
Pay Per Month (After Gas Expense): $670.40"

Hello, the $7.67 is gas used per SHIFT,as the 52.5 miles was a shift, not hour total. Redo your math, dividing 7,67 by 3.5 BEFORE deducting. That adds $5.11 per HOUR to Gross effective pay.
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Unread 05-11-2012, 09:12 PM
 
14,200 posts, read 5,275,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
Wait a minute - aren't employers required to reimburse employees for using their own car on the job?? The IRS rate is 50-some cents a mile I believe, so that would offset the costs of actually driving the car on the job, plus a bit for wear and tear, insurance, etc. If I ever worked at a place that didn't give credit for miles driven, I'd be reporting them to a bunch of alphabet agencies quicker than you can say "this pizza sucks!"...lol.
There is no requirement to reimburse.
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Unread 05-12-2012, 12:04 PM
Status: "Spring is here - but don't blink, you'll miss it" (set 18 hours ago)
 
Location: I live in the ATL, I belong in the UP
1,342 posts, read 990,640 times
Reputation: 2040
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtn View Post
There is no requirement to reimburse.
Seriously? I thought it was?

If I ever were required to use my personal vehicle for anything job-related without being paid the IRS rate for mileage used, the boss would get the big "f-you" from me, as I'd not stand for it.
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Unread 05-12-2012, 04:34 PM
 
14,200 posts, read 5,275,882 times
Reputation: 5142
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
Seriously? I thought it was?

If I ever were required to use my personal vehicle for anything job-related without being paid the IRS rate for mileage used, the boss would get the big "f-you" from me, as I'd not stand for it.

Most reimburse, but they need not do so. They also are free if they do to set their own mileage rate. IRS rate is a "suggestion", not a mandate.

We use two rates-IRS for regular emps paying their own car related stuff, and about 30% of IRS for those we pay a monthly car allowance to. Its 100% our choice to pay anything.
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Unread 05-17-2012, 01:47 AM
 
6 posts, read 15,800 times
Reputation: 16
[quote=bobtn;24268340]
Quote:
Originally Posted by forgetwhoiam View Post
I deliver pizzas for Pizza Hut. I think the $16 per hour is not accurate what so ever. We might get to take out 3-4 pizza orders per hour during rush hours, which is from about 12pm to 1:30pm and 5pm to 8pm. So if you are working from 2pm to 5pm there is no way you are leaving there with $16 per hour. Okay, now with the tipping situation, on average, we recieve $2.50-$3.00. The delievery charge that you pay when you order a pizza is $2.50 and the driver only recieves $1.10 of that. Also the average driver only has a 3.5 hour shift, and about 20 hours per week. So let's add this up really quick.

Delivery Driver Pay Rate: $5.25 per hour
Tips (Averaging 3 per hour @ $2.50 per delivery ): $2.50*3=$7.50
Delivery Charge Received (Averaging 3 per hour): $1.10*3=$3.30
TOTAL PER HOUR : $16.05 per hour!
TOTAL PER SHIFT (Assuming It's The Average Shift): $56.18
TOTAL PER WEEK: $321.00

Now before you start screaming at my comment saying oh I was right...now you need to take out the deductions that a driver has because of his job:

The average delievery is between 2-10 miles from the store. So we are going to round to 5 just to keep it simple.

So each hour the driver takes 3 deliveries: 3*5=15.
Average shift & milage/hour: 3.5*15=52.5


So let's take some gas into consideration now. The average car gets around 25 miles per gallon.
So assuming you get 25 mpg you are going to use 2.1 gallons of gas on an average shift.
Now, in Missouri, gas is at $3.65 per gallon. So after one night the driver will spend $7.67 in gas alone.

Time for some more math:
Pay Per Hour: $16.05
Gas Used Per Hour: $7.67
Total Pay (After Gas Expense) per hour: $8.38
Pay Per Week (After Gas Expense): $167.60
Pay Per Month (After Gas Expense): $670.40"

Hello, the $7.67 is gas used per SHIFT,as the 52.5 miles was a shift, not hour total. Redo your math, dividing 7,67 by 3.5 BEFORE deducting. That adds $5.11 per HOUR to Gross effective pay.
I think that the amount of tips, number of deliveries taken per hour, as well as mileage driven varies greatly depending on the store and the city. Our delivery area was very busy, shaped like a figure eight, and most of our deliveries were clustered very close to the store...the result was that drivers would have high deliveries per hour and usually low miles driven per shift. Also, we got good tips (maybe related to being in a very high COL area).

To break down the math, on a typical 6 hour closing shift:
7.25*6 = $43.5 in wages
18-22 deliveries ($1.25/delivery gas reimbursement plus tips) = $80-110 cash at the end of each night
Total mileage driven: 60-100 miles, gas was $3.50ish

It is just like any other tipped job really... earnings are largely dependent on the store/customers/area/city
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Unread 04-26-2013, 11:17 AM
 
3 posts, read 20,996 times
Reputation: 11
I have read these posts and there are a few thing I wish to say. I am a 52 year old man when I was in my teens just out of high school I want to go to collage and learn about computer programming, I had taken a course through my high school in this field and passed with flying colors, unfortunatly neither I nor my parents could afford the cost of collage and since I had poor credit and there were no education grants, like there are now, I was forced to take any job I could find, and those jobs were minimum wage jobs. At that time minimum wage was $3.15 an hour a few years later minimum wage was increased to $3.35 an hour and it stayed there for several years, even though the cost of living increased every year. As prices for every thing went up and up minimum wage did not. The price for a gallon of gas back then was $0.68. Now 30 years later minimum wage has finally more than doubled what it was back then but gas prices have increased more than 5 times ($0.68 x 5.22 = $3.55 ) what it was then and every thing else has increased at the same level or higher.

I currently work at Pizza Hut as a delivery driver, I have a house that I have a mortgage on and I have bills to pay. The current minimum wage $7.75 per hour, Pizza Hut is planning to decrease that by $3.00 per hour for the time we are on deliveries, they say it is to stay competitive with with thier competition.

In my eyes I think that minimum wage should be at least $12.00 per hour, not that it would do much good because every time minimum wage goes up so do prices on every thing, I say this because of how much it costs to buy anything these days, just to buy a decent new chair costs almost $500.00 and to buy a new car well with the current minimum wage it would be impossable to afford, I have worn out two vehicals delivering pizza these two vehicale cost ME over $25000.00 combined, I have been delivering pizza for about 12 years. The main reason I stayed so long delivering pizza it beacuse it used to be good money once I add in the tips I get, I WAS making enough to pay my bills and have some left for a few on the finer things in life, now I am going to lose about 30% of my monthly pay and since Pizza Hut has all these carry out only specials my monthly tips have gone down, due to less deliveries, by about the same amount that is over a $600.00 per month loss, could you afford to lose that much money per month. Now at over 50 years old I need to look for another job or a better one. Unfortunatly most companies really don't want to hire someone my age in an entry position, so I have to rely on what ever I can find now to suppliment what I make as a driver. Is this fair? In my opinion no it is not.

Now lets talk about car repairs it is well known that the more you drive the more often you will need to make repairs, thing like oil changes, new brake pads, new tires this is just the tip of the iceburg, the more you use something the faster it wears out and the more it costs to keep it going just recently I had to spend over $1,600.00 for transmission work on my current delivery vehical, the one I was using before that needs the engine rebuilt that will cost over $2,500.00 how in the world will I be able to afford that when I am losing a third of my income, and what if my current delivery vehical breaks down how could I afford to get it fixed, I guess I would'nt and I would be out of a job with no way to find another without a vehical to go looking for one with.

Something that really irritates me is someone making comments about something they have not been through or done themselves, if you have not been there done that then you have no right to make these comments untill you have been there and done that, trying to eke out a life making minimum wage, living from pay check to pay check trying to figure out which bill to pay later (do I pay my mortgage this month or my electric bill which is more important) then trying to catch up if and when you can.

Lets talk about that Exxon CEO that makes $450,000,000.00 per year, did you ever stop to think why someone makes that kind of money, and what does he does with all that money, I could live the rest of my life with one tenth of that and live quite well, of course do realize that the main reason prices are so high is because the top execs make that kind of money if they deserve it or not. Personally I think it is rediculous for any body to be paid more than $1,000,000.00 a year for any position, that is more than enough for anyone to live on.

I have heard many politicians say that increased prices fuels the economy, I don't see how, if every thing costs more people seem to spend less and when people spent less then companies go out of business or increase prices even more to try to cover thier loss, or lay off people or decrease pay how does that fuel the economy, with more people out of work or making less how does that fuel the economy. You tell me.
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Unread 04-26-2013, 12:04 PM
 
3 posts, read 20,996 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by drshang View Post
mpsgirl,

I used the HHS poverty line here:

[URL="http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/09poverty.shtml"]2009 Federal Poverty Guidelines[/URL]

The average household size in the US is 3 so I used $18,310 and divided by 2000 total hours of work in a year (50 weeks * 40 hours) to get $9.15 an hour. I think one person on a minimum wage job should be able to support the average household in the US or smaller without the need of federal assistance.
Two thing wrong with this equasion first there are 52 weeks in a year not 50 so the average per hour would be $8.80 not $9.15

The second is you are using outdated guidelines from four years ago.

And just so you know the current minimum wage is $7.75 and once you do the math that would give the minimum wage earner $16,120.00 before tax and the current tax rate (all taxes combined) is just under 30% that is over $5,000.00 in taxes the minimum wage earner pays, could you live on $11,000.00 a year.
Now takeing out what Pizza Hut wants to pay drivers while making deliveries $3.00 less per hour, as a driver I spend about 1/4 of my time at work on deliveries that is $4,030.00 less before tax, after tax that would be $2,686.00 less per year, that would be $8,314.00 per year income, now could you live on that with a mortgage, other standard household bills and kids to feed?
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Unread 04-26-2013, 12:33 PM
 
3 posts, read 20,996 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpsgirl View Post
If that is a person's problem is the minimum wage, find a job that pays more then. Simple enough.
.
Its not that simple, since most jobs (that do not require a degree) only pay minumum wage where would someone look for a higher paying job?
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Unread 04-26-2013, 02:16 PM
 
330 posts, read 309,637 times
Reputation: 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcs9959 View Post
Two thing wrong with this equasion first there are 52 weeks in a year not 50 so the average per hour would be $8.80 not $9.15

The second is you are using outdated guidelines from four years ago.

And just so you know the current minimum wage is $7.75 and once you do the math that would give the minimum wage earner $16,120.00 before tax and the current tax rate (all taxes combined) is just under 30% that is over $5,000.00 in taxes the minimum wage earner pays, could you live on $11,000.00 a year.
Now takeing out what Pizza Hut wants to pay drivers while making deliveries $3.00 less per hour, as a driver I spend about 1/4 of my time at work on deliveries that is $4,030.00 less before tax, after tax that would be $2,686.00 less per year, that would be $8,314.00 per year income, now could you live on that with a mortgage, other standard household bills and kids to feed?
He used current guidelines. You bumped a 4 year old thread.
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