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Old 07-18-2009, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Colorado Spings
157 posts, read 433,889 times
Reputation: 62
They were very small businesses like I mentioned, but it was enough to learn a fair amount and all required their own tax ID. I don't claim to know tax laws inside and out (I don't think anyone does actually), but I do know that I've been able to itemize expenses on my taxes since I was 17.

I personally find the lawsuit ridiculous (along with most that fall in the same category) because I don't think they are necessary. If wages were allowed to be adjusted based on supply and demand maybe our cost of living would be more reasonable for the wages (even though we're extremely low in comparison to many other countries in the world). If no one wanted to earn the wage being offered by a business, they simply wouldn't work there. The company would either have to increase their wage offering or go belly up from no employees. I'm very pro free-market because I think the system works better that way.
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Old 07-18-2009, 04:39 PM
 
1,955 posts, read 3,255,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpsgirl View Post
I'm very pro free-market because I think the system works better that way.
Of course it works better that way, but a truly free market robs an entire class of people - the evil trinity of lawyers, bureaucrats and politicians - from their livelihood. These people are smart enough to run their mouth in ways to ensnare the gullible masses but too dumb to understand how economics actually works. So they play the emotion card.
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Old 07-18-2009, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Colorado Spings
157 posts, read 433,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneOne View Post
Of course it works better that way, but a truly free market robs an entire class of people - the evil trinity of lawyers, bureaucrats and politicians - from their livelihood. These people are smart enough to run their mouth in ways to ensnare the gullible masses but too dumb to understand how economics actually works. So they play the emotion card.
It's funny you mention that. My father and I were just having this discussion about an hour ago that a lot of this frivolousness is brought about by lawyers who are encouraging this ridiculous behavior. I'm in my mid 20's, my father in his mid 50's, and there is definitely a huge difference between how his generation handled "issues" and how mine handles them. My generation and the one after seem to find it far easier to sue to get their way (more or less, their way of pouting and throwing a tantrum) rather than pulling themselves up by their bootstraps and helping themselves out. Now they'd rather just get a hand-out. I guess that's the *new* "American Dream" though...
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Old 07-18-2009, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,249 posts, read 11,271,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpsgirl View Post
Could you explain to me though why a teenager *needs* to be earning $10+/hour when not only do they provide limited skills, but their own bills are typically limited because most are living w/ parents still? In fact, oftentimes, the people that are on minimum wage are there because they have little or no skills and *cost* a business a large amount of money to train. By a business taking on an unskilled/underskilled worker, they are taking on a HUGE risk. They risk that by putting money into that employee for things like training, that that employee will only soon leave to find better pay somewhere else because the next business doesn't have to invest as much to train them. This is just a single example of the cost of hiring the type of people that typically apply for those minimum wage jobs.

Why should someone that has little or no work experience be paid nearly the same as someone that's worked for 10 years and added to their list of skills and knowledge every year, thus making them *more* valuable as an employee?
Teenagers usually work only part time and they have expenses too. Many of them buy their own clothes, pay for cellphone service and some of them own cars. And it is nice to take your steady to a movie or concert once in awhile too.
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Old 07-18-2009, 07:17 PM
 
6,301 posts, read 10,001,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpsgirl View Post
They were very small businesses like I mentioned, but it was enough to learn a fair amount and all required their own tax ID. I don't claim to know tax laws inside and out (I don't think anyone does actually), but I do know that I've been able to itemize expenses on my taxes since I was 17.
Unless you were itemizing a LOT of stuff it's hard to beat the standard deduction. That is/was his point. Anyone can itemize but most (especially low income teenagers) won't ever touch the amount needed for it to make sense to.

I agree with your point however. I left Pizza Hut to go stock groceries for $10/hr (1998 dollars). No wear and tear on my car (not that I delivered that much), my clothes didn't get ruined by the old food smell (anyone who's worked fast food knows that fermentation smell), etc. On a side note I was also hired at Best Buy for $8.50/hr at the same time as the grocery store. The sad thing is those wages haven't changed in a decade, but gas is 3x as expensive, housing is 2x or more as expensive, etc. I bought a 4 year old Nissan Altima for $5800 from a Nissan DEALER, what does a 4 year old Altima go for now? $15k or more?

As a teenager I was making $700/paycheck after tax working for $10/hr back in 1998, I thought I was loaded. Bought my car with cash so no car payment, no one had cell phones, etc.
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Old 07-18-2009, 07:22 PM
 
1,955 posts, read 3,255,473 times
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Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
Unless you were itemizing a LOT of stuff it's hard to beat the standard deduction. That is/was his point. Anyone can itemize but most (especially low income teenagers) won't ever touch the amount needed for it to make sense to.

I agree with your point however. I left Pizza Hut to go stock groceries for $10/hr (1998 dollars). No wear and tear on my car (not that I delivered that much), my clothes didn't get ruined by the old food smell (anyone who's worked fast food knows that fermentation smell), etc. On a side note I was also hired at Best Buy for $8.50/hr at the same time as the grocery store. The sad thing is those wages haven't changed in a decade, but gas is 3x as expensive, housing is 2x or more as expensive, etc. I bought a 4 year old Nissan Altima for $5800 from a Nissan DEALER, what does a 4 year old Altima go for now? $15k or more?

As a teenager I was making $700/paycheck after tax working for $10/hr back in 1998, I thought I was loaded. Bought my car with cash so no car payment, no one had cell phones, etc.
Our Federal Reserve at work for you!
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Old 07-18-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
2,984 posts, read 3,594,997 times
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Originally Posted by KevK View Post
The min wage should really be $10 per hour.
Whether minimum wage is $7 or $10, here in New York it's still poverty. Plain and simple.
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Old 07-23-2009, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Business ethics is an oxymoron.
899 posts, read 787,957 times
Reputation: 1640
Yeah let's stick it to them so that we can 1) save a dime on each pizza or 2) see an extra 1% dividend on Yum! Foods stock.

Another overlooked thing is that being a pizza delivery driver, while not necessarily skilled labor, is among the most risky occupations out there. I believe it trails only police officer, fireman, and oil drill worker in terms of potential risk to life.

I too was once a Pizza Hut driver for about a year. So I know what it's like. And yeah anyone who's done it can tell you that the "nicest" houses were *ALWAYS* the ones who tipped the least (if at all) *AND* made the most onerous demands for their orders. And most likely to be arguing in this discussion on why pizza drivers are overpaid.

Some of you may think that pizza drivers are uneducated dime-a-dozen workers performing a skill of no value (though if it has no value, then why are you using it?). But we do have memories. Very good memories. And we talk. So if you are a poor or nonexistant tipper and you order more than once, when you start noticing your pizza arriving later and later, with the cheese all slid to one side, and a driver that always seems to have "just" ran out of those parmesan cheese and red pepper packets, it aint no accident pal.

Either pony up. Get it yourself. Or make your own.
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Old 07-23-2009, 10:03 AM
 
2,199 posts, read 4,949,081 times
Reputation: 1640
Being a pizza delivery person is a choice. If the pay doesn't suit someone or they find it too life-threatening or high stress, they can simply choose something else. No one's holding a pizza cutter to their head.

I think being a soldier, a pilot, an ambulance driver, a race car driver, an ER doctor, a coal miner or, oh a few hundred other other occupations, would be far more dangerous than driving one's personal vehicle on city streets with a few pizzas in tow. Perhaps they should tack "hazard pay" onto their claims and really impress the jury with the severity of their plight.
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Old 07-23-2009, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Colorado Spings
157 posts, read 433,889 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodbyehollywood View Post
Being a pizza delivery person is a choice. If the pay doesn't suit someone or they find it too life-threatening or high stress, they can simply choose something else. No one's holding a pizza cutter to their head.

I think being a soldier, a pilot, an ambulance driver, a race car driver, an ER doctor, a coal miner or, oh a few hundred other other occupations, would be far more dangerous than driving one's personal vehicle on city streets with a few pizzas in tow. Perhaps they should tack "hazard pay" onto their claims and really impress the jury with the severity of their plight.
Amen! My husband is a soldier in the army, as an MP no less. In all the years he's been in, he's never once demanded a pay raise (even though congress makes sure to take their $100,000+ bonuses every year), never once complained about the hazards of the job (but been deployed to war zones nearly 1/2 of his 10 year career so far, and suffered a brain hemorrhage while deployed), and never once moaned about not getting ANY tips (people in this country have obviously forgotten what TIP means, so we should just give them more money because they *think* they deserve it for doing what they're supposed to be doing in the first place....their job). He never asks for people to thank him (because he feels he's just doing his job, just like every other person out there), and he knows being in this job is a choice, plain and simple. If he ever decided the pay wasn't good enough, the hazards too great, etc., he'd leave at the end of his term.

I seriously how people can complain so much over some of the most ridiculous things that they do. I guess everyone just wants an easy ride anymore.
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