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Old 06-24-2010, 09:26 PM
 
3,236 posts, read 3,917,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JesseJames View Post
.

I fail math tests even with extra time, calculator, scratch paper, formulas, etc. I am a 20 year old with the math skills of a 5th grader. I can barely do figures in my head, I can barely do multiplication tables. Is there any hope?
Non-math office work?
Can you count money? You could work at a pet store.
Professional dog trainer?
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Old 06-25-2010, 06:10 AM
 
20,797 posts, read 32,983,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
I wasn't referring to the workplace; I was responding to what the OP said about sp ed resources in community colleges or adult education schools. And I disagree that anyone, especially someone who appears to have made as much effort as this person has, cannot master basic math skills with the right resources.

And in regard to teaching, I disagree: in many states, one needs to pass a math competency test just to get a high school diploma, never mind what a college degree would require.
Exceptions can be made, especially in a case like this-it happens all the time.
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Old 06-25-2010, 12:08 PM
 
872 posts, read 827,282 times
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I second the idea about focusing on writing and the IEP idea.

Regardless, I feel for you JesseJames. Good luck!
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Old 06-25-2010, 12:55 PM
 
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Something with written word or arts. Editor, writer, proofreader, art teacher, psychologist that does not write scripts, lawyer. You may have one advanced class that you will need to have a tutor for. But you can do it. Its just going to take a lot of work. Try learning music too. It helps improve math skills. All tutors are NOT created equal either. Some teachers are better and finding a way to explain things to you that makes sense. So do try different tutors. Sometimes people who have problems with simple math do better in the advanced maths too once they get into the swing of it.

I have been helping the s.o. with his math and he is understanding it better than he did way back in high school. He also does better with geometry compared to simple math.
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Old 06-25-2010, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Metairie, La.
1,156 posts, read 857,096 times
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Lawyers need to know some math or else they wouldn't be very effective in stealing from their clients.
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Old 06-25-2010, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Northeast Ohio
571 posts, read 546,960 times
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Non-math or science teaching may be good. General Education Requirement math classes in college usually aren't that bad and there usually are simplistic classes you can take to meet that requirement. For example, I'm getting an English teaching degree & am planning on taking a business-math class that relates to things like balancing a checkbook, calculating practical things, ect.

If you are any good at writing try demandstudios.com they will pay you $15 per 800 word "how to" article. I know someone who makes $400 a week off of that.
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Old 06-25-2010, 10:29 PM
 
10,274 posts, read 7,796,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UntamedOhioan View Post
Non-math or science teaching may be good. General Education Requirement math classes in college usually aren't that bad and there usually are simplistic classes you can take to meet that requirement. For example, I'm getting an English teaching degree & am planning on taking a business-math class that relates to things like balancing a checkbook, calculating practical things, ect.

If you are any good at writing try demandstudios.com they will pay you $15 per 800 word "how to" article. I know someone who makes $400 a week off of that.
Please do NOT suggest teaching science without math. Math is the foundation of science.

I wonder what your business math actually requires. Most colleges I know even junior colleges require College Algebra.

Writing certainly might work if he is good at it though.
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Old 06-25-2010, 10:44 PM
 
10,274 posts, read 7,796,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JesseJames View Post
I have a learning disability that makes it so math is impossible for me. It took me 3 YEARS just to learn multi digit addition/subtraction. I also have something called Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, my body doesn't produce enough colagen (sp) in my joints, so they are unstable and randomly dislocate. I've thought of:
Vet/Vet tech: Can't get into the school, too much math.
Paramedic/EMT: Constant lifting will destroy my joints, math.
Air Force/Army/Navy, etc.: My joints.

I fail math tests even with extra time, calculator, scratch paper, formulas, etc. I am a 20 year old with the math skills of a 5th grader. I can barely do figures in my head, I can barely do multiplication tables. Is there any hope?
First of all, you are NOT stupid despite what people have told you. You are correct though that you won't get into most colleges without some math. OTOH, you might find that higher math skills are easier than arithmetic. It depends a lot on how your brain works.

Note please that often people with dyscalculia (math disability) are very intelligent. Not as much is known about this particular disability as is known about dyslexia (reading disability)

Do you have access to anyone who can truly evaluate how you learn? If you can figure out your best learning style, then you can find resources that use that style to teach you mathematics. One possibility is learning through music. Music is actually very math related since notes correlate to specific frequencies. Art is another possibility since drawing can be correlated with geometry.

I hope you find a way around your difficulties.

Dorothy

Don't let the title put you off this:
Everyday Math for Dummies(r) by Charles Seiter - Powell's Books
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Old 06-25-2010, 10:48 PM
 
Location: it depends
5,471 posts, read 2,490,160 times
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Default good job, no math skills required

Various branches of the US Government use budget analysts that have no math skills.
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Old 06-26-2010, 06:50 AM
 
20,797 posts, read 32,983,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Please do NOT suggest teaching science without math. Math is the foundation of science.

I wonder what your business math actually requires. Most colleges I know even junior colleges require College Algebra.

Writing certainly might work if he is good at it though.
I think he meant not to teach math or science but to pick another subject area. Most colleges DO require a math class but if he has an IEP there are chances he can get an accommodation for that and not have to take the class or take a modified version of the class.
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