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Old 09-29-2010, 07:37 PM
 
16,107 posts, read 17,930,802 times
Reputation: 15902

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I don't know how many of you saw the story in 2008 of Alex Barton who was *voted out of his kindergarten class* with the teacher providing the horrible experiences.

This is the original story
Teacher lets Morningside students vote out classmate, 5 TCPalm.com

Many of us wrote emails and letters and called the school and Ms. Portillo was suspended for a year and stripped of her tenure. The school board, however, relented and they reinstated her after a hearing.

Well, it looks like she should have been fired outright. Here's the newest story of the teachers in that school including Ms. Portillo

Teacher who kicked 5 year old autistic out of class now refused to wear mike for deaf child - National special education | Examiner.com

Quote:
Now, in the latest case, a report from the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights found evidence that Portillo and two other teachers discriminated against a girl with a hearing impairment at Allapattah Flats K-8 School in Port St Lucie.

The teachers were supposed to wear a microphone whenever the girl was in their classroom, so she could hear them. But the girl claimed sometimes they did not wear it.

Allegations listed in the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights report:
This is what special needs students are subjected to in so many school districts. What an awful shame that these teachers have no empathy for students with disabilities at all.

Dorothy

Last edited by toobusytoday; 10-04-2010 at 10:42 AM.. Reason: SNIPPET and links please. City-data defines snippet as 3 sentences.
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Old 09-30-2010, 02:37 PM
 
910 posts, read 2,926,543 times
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That this woman wasn't fired is shameful. I don't understand why more are not outraged. Was this discussed before--did I just miss it?
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Old 09-30-2010, 08:17 PM
 
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I had it on the special needs forum under parenting, but it's education too, so I posted it here. No one commented on it in this forum except you.

Dorothy
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Old 10-04-2010, 08:41 AM
 
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Disgusting, but you might have to look at it from the teachers' persectives, too. I've heard that inclusion is relatively new, and some of the older teachers, who taught when they did tracking and relegated special needs children to separate classes, might feel threatened by the new responsibility of taking care of children with special needs. These teachers might not feel prepared and may take their frustrations and fears out on students. It's not fair, and it shouldn't be legal, but the schools should also provide adequate support for new inclusion teachers so that they don't feel overwhelmed with this new responsibility. Some teachers, however, are given many responsibilities that they are not equipped to handle on their own. For instance, a ninth grade history teacher is faced with several students in his or her class that cannot read well enough to get through the textbook. This teacher, however, was only trained on how to deliver the subject matter and doesn't know anything about teaching reading. Because these students aren't learning, they are disengaged and disrupting the rest of the students who are trying to learn. This could become pretty stressful for said teacher since he/she has never dealt with inclusion before and doesn't really know what accomodations to give these students. This teacher may resort to picking on and isolating the special needs students who are causing disruptions in order to re-establish some sense of order. The teacher would have no need to do this, however, if the school provided proper training and support for new inclusion teachers in the first place. From what I've heard, though, perhaps most schools do not. Again, that still doesn't make what this teacher did right, but hopefully it does provide some perspective. Perhaps the teacher was only dealing with the problem as well as she knew how, because she wasn't given the proper training to deal with it with right way. I would like to think that there are sort of legitimate causes for such behavior and that people aren't just naturally abusive, although some people probably are.
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Old 10-04-2010, 10:03 AM
 
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She was not an *older teacher* She had been teaching about 10 years when the Alex Barton incident happened. She has now been teaching 12 years.

A hearing impaired student is not like an autistic one either. The autistic student was only 5 years old. This middle schooler simply needed to hear the lessons to learn. She was 12.

IDEA was passed in 1975, btw. It's NOT new. It was amended in 1997 and 2004. When I went back to school to get my certification in 1985, we had to take a course in special education law to get our certificates. It was not an adequate course, but this teacher should have had even more training than I did and I never was this disrespectful to my inclusion students (I taught high school).

History of the IDEA: Thirty Years of Progress in Educating Children with Disabilities Through IDEA

Quote:
Congress enacted what was then the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (Public Law 94-142) on Nov. 29, 1975. The law was intended to support states and localities in protecting the rights of, meeting the individual needs of, and improving the results for infants, toddlers, children and youths with disabilities and their families.

Before IDEA, many children like Lee were denied access to education and opportunities to learn.

Last edited by toobusytoday; 10-04-2010 at 10:44 AM.. Reason: link and SNIPPET please
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Old 10-04-2010, 06:44 PM
 
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Yes, mainstreaming gone bad. Many regular education teachers don't understand children with special needs, many call them lazy, spoiled, stupid. They don't get it. But, this teacher obviously needed support, education, and training on the children in her classroom with special needs. I taught special education for over 20 years, and just could not believe the ignorance of regular education teachers towards children in Special Education. And the disdain they treated me with, like I was not smart enough to teach "real" kids. Whatever...
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Old 10-04-2010, 08:26 PM
 
270 posts, read 437,939 times
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Well, okay, maybe I didn't have all of my facts straight, but the point is that some of the regular education teachers sometimes seem to not have adequate training and education to deal with special needs children. This is unfortunate for both teachers and students. The school systems and the federal government should work with teachers and train them until they are well equipped to handle special needs children. The school systems should make sure all inclusion teachers know how to interpret IEPs, respond to special needs children in a caring manner, and understand how to make the classroom a welcoming environment for all students. Teachers also should not be encouraged to misinterpret a child's disability as defiance by not being given adequate information about the disability. In my opinion, inclusion teachers should also have prior experience working with children with common disabilities found in an inclusion classroom. Again, these incidents are unfortunate, but I think better preparation and training would help.
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Old 10-04-2010, 08:46 PM
 
5,684 posts, read 8,145,907 times
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Has anyone considered that maybe they just forgot to put the microphone on, and that's why they're only having to be retrained? Maybe it was a mistake. The article says sometimes not all the time. The yelling at the student to pay attention is another story as teachers should not yell at their students, but I can see the microphone as an honest mistake.
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Old 10-05-2010, 08:49 PM
 
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I don't see that as an honest mistake when we are talking about a teacher who already had been *retrained* after the incident with her 5 year old autistic student. I'm sorry, but I think that woman should be fired and never work with kids again.
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Old 10-05-2010, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Central FL
1,382 posts, read 3,274,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spazkat9696 View Post
Has anyone considered that maybe they just forgot to put the microphone on, and that's why they're only having to be retrained? Maybe it was a mistake. The article says sometimes not all the time. The yelling at the student to pay attention is another story as teachers should not yell at their students, but I can see the microphone as an honest mistake.
I thought about that too (being a teacher turned stay at home mom for now) but what about the part about wearing the mike but not turning it on and then laughing in the face of the student?

I have to say - teachers like this give the rest of us a black eye. It makes me sick. Oh, and I don't have the link handy, but there was a recent article about a new form of bullying on Yahoo news the other day. It said that children with food allergies are being subjected to food-related bullying such as having peanut butter smeared on their face if they are allergic to peanuts. The kicker was that up to 20% of the supposed perpetrators of this behavior are "school staff." Unbelievable!

Having classmates vote out a 5 year old is beyond stupid even if the child were to have major behavior issues that were entirely within his control. I can't imagine what kind of logic leads you to such an action. Based on my experiences with teacher co-workers over the past few years, I have to ask "Where is the common sense??????"
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