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Old 12-17-2010, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Virginia
5,317 posts, read 6,866,575 times
Reputation: 1886

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I teach in a public elementary school. Our students do fine without uniforms. We really have no reason to implement a school uniform policy so I don't see it happening. If there is a need to implement school uniforms, do so, but if there is not a need then don't.
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Old 12-17-2010, 09:03 PM
 
7,765 posts, read 9,334,690 times
Reputation: 13800
Quote:
Originally Posted by D3stiny View Post
Thank god school uniforms don't exist in most schools in America. I realize a couple Catholic/private schools have them. But if they ever hit public schools, there will be an open rebellion against the federal government of United States. A rebellion that will result in massive loss of life. Taking away the right to dress freely in American high schools and junior high schools is the line that we the people of the United States of America draw. Our Founding Fathers gave us the right to bear arms to prevent totalitarianism and rebel against our government if need be. I hope it doesn't come to a rebellion, but we will rebel if necessary. Hopefully things will never come to that though, hopefully school uniforms never exist. And they never will, because if they did, there would be a rebellion. Everyone will rebel, both high school students and your average citizen who has had enough of this totalitarianism in America.
You really don't know what you are talking about. Many, many public schools have uniforms, and not just in lower income areas. The wealthy city we lived in previously in FL had uniforms from elementary school through middle school.It wasn't a big deal to the students or the parents.

If you think the issue is worth open rebellion and loss of life you need to learn about some real problems in the world today.
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Old 12-18-2010, 08:03 AM
 
270 posts, read 264,058 times
Reputation: 97
Well, our public schools have uniforms from K-12 and even in some of the junior colleges. I think it's that way in a lot of places. It's a nice idea in theory. Everyone dresses the same, so we cut down on cliques and discrimination between the wealthy and the disadvantaged. If this were how it played out, and if the color schemes the districts chose made any sense, I would have little problem with the uniform policy, but around here students can get detention and have their lowered for not having on the right belt. It's also a bit of a classist issue, too, because the wealthier children can get away with being out of uniform, and no one usually says anything. In this way, I agree with the OP, because enforcement of the uniform policy becomes selective, students are punished unfairly, and possibly students see it as another example of totalitarian authority of administrators. Ultimately, it kind of adds to the prison-like feel of public school. Plus, the uniform policies we have in place are too easy to violate.

I propose that we find a way to give students a bit more freedom so that can concentrate on learning. How about we have students follow a professional dress code instead? This will allow students a reasonable amount of freedom to choose what they wear but still ensure they are dressed appropriately. I suggest we require our students to show up in medium quality business suits that they might be able to find at the mall. Another possibility would be to allow to students to wear well-fitting jeans or a pair of slacks and a T-shirt or a denim skirt or another kind of skirt (as long as it's decent-looking and slightly below the knee, as would be expected attire of a serious professional) with a blouse.

As primary clothing, students would not be allowed to wear:
T-shirts promoting hatred, harassment, racism, or harmful substances
Cut-off T-shirts
Tube tops
any shirt or blouse showing the belly button
bicycle shorts
jeans with holes in them!
hip-hugging "skinny" jeans
Leggings (meaning only leggings with a loose-T-shirt)
Tights (meaning ONLY tights and a short T-shirt. Tights are OKAY if worn appropriately.)
Shirts cut to expose portions of the bust area
Anything that, in a professional atmosphere, would inappropriately expose the body and would serve to distract others from the task at hand, inappropriately call attention to the person wearing the clothing, present a non-professional image of the person wearing the clothing, impede the person from doing his or her job, for instance, too much jewelry or bangle bracelets, etc.)

Shoes:
Must be comfortable and look professional.
Suggestion:
No tennis shoes or sneakers.

Last edited by surburbangirlie; 12-18-2010 at 08:15 AM..
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Old 12-18-2010, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Owasso, OK
1,224 posts, read 1,924,429 times
Reputation: 1043
Quote:
Originally Posted by collegestudentfromalabama View Post
Well, our public schools have uniforms from K-12 and even in some of the junior colleges. I think it's that way in a lot of places. It's a nice idea in theory. Everyone dresses the same, so we cut down on cliques and discrimination between the wealthy and the disadvantaged. If this were how it played out, and if the color schemes the districts chose made any sense, I would have little problem with the uniform policy, but around here students can get detention and have their lowered for not having on the right belt. It's also a bit of a classist issue, too, because the wealthier children can get away with being out of uniform, and no one usually says anything. In this way, I agree with the OP, because enforcement of the uniform policy becomes selective, students are punished unfairly, and possibly students see it as another example of totalitarian authority of administrators. Ultimately, it kind of adds to the prison-like feel of public school. Plus, the uniform policies we have in place are too easy to violate.

I propose that we find a way to give students a bit more freedom so that can concentrate on learning. How about we have students follow a professional dress code instead? This will allow students a reasonable amount of freedom to choose what they wear but still ensure they are dressed appropriately. I suggest we require our students to show up in medium quality business suits that they might be able to find at the mall. Another possibility would be to allow to students to wear well-fitting jeans or a pair of slacks and a T-shirt or a denim skirt or another kind of skirt (as long as it's decent-looking and slightly below the knee, as would be expected attire of a serious professional) with a blouse.

As primary clothing, students would not be allowed to wear:
T-shirts promoting hatred, harassment, racism, or harmful substances
Cut-off T-shirts
Tube tops
any shirt or blouse showing the belly button
bicycle shorts
jeans with holes in them!
hip-hugging "skinny" jeans
Leggings (meaning only leggings with a loose-T-shirt)
Tights (meaning ONLY tights and a short T-shirt. Tights are OKAY if worn appropriately.)
Shirts cut to expose portions of the bust area
Anything that, in a professional atmosphere, would inappropriately expose the body and would serve to distract others from the task at hand, inappropriately call attention to the person wearing the clothing, present a non-professional image of the person wearing the clothing, impede the person from doing his or job, for instance, too much jewelry or bangle bracelets, etc.)

Shoes:
Must be comfortable and look professional.
Suggestion:
No tennis shoes or sneakers.
Try enforcing that.
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Old 12-18-2010, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Fort Payne Alabama
765 posts, read 680,789 times
Reputation: 1231
Quote:
Originally Posted by D3stiny View Post
Thank god school uniforms don't exist in most schools in America. I realize a couple Catholic/private schools have them. But if they ever hit public schools, there will be an open rebellion against the federal government of United States. A rebellion that will result in massive loss of life. Taking away the right to dress freely in American high schools and junior high schools is the line that we the people of the United States of America draw. Our Founding Fathers gave us the right to bear arms to prevent totalitarianism and rebel against our government if need be. I hope it doesn't come to a rebellion, but we will rebel if necessary. Hopefully things will never come to that though, hopefully school uniforms never exist. And they never will, because if they did, there would be a rebellion. Everyone will rebel, both high school students and your average citizen who has had enough of this totalitarianism in America.
Can you say...."Paranoid"
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Old 12-18-2010, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
22,974 posts, read 17,947,197 times
Reputation: 32505
Hmmmn. When I was a kid, and used to see the parochial school kids waiting at the bus stop in their uniforms, I used to think how nice they looked.

When I was in my 20s and used to see policemen, firemen and soldiers in their dress uniforms, I used to think how handsome they looked. I still think they are all handsome. Even the milkman (you have to be old to appreciate that) looked handsome in his pure white uniform.

C'mon you guys! When you have your nurse and french maid fantasies are you thinking "totalitarianism" when you see their uniforms?

I don't think I've ever seen an ugly man in uniform...well, except for those tattooed grizzly mean men in their ugly orange prison jumpsuits.
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Old 12-18-2010, 09:15 AM
 
270 posts, read 264,058 times
Reputation: 97
Well, maybe it's because the students sometimes don't know how to wear them appropriately, but I remember school uniforms. There wasn't a lot of variety, they didn't at all look professional, they were sometimes inconvenient, and perhaps they sometimes undermined the image of a competent sophisticated individual students would have rather presented. I think I can understand why students don't like to wear them. I think the school systems should at least allow the students more professional and more appealing options, and, as for my previous suggestion not working, we follow similar dress codes in our profession as educators, so why can't the students just follow our example?

Last edited by surburbangirlie; 12-18-2010 at 09:23 AM..
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Old 12-18-2010, 09:22 AM
 
43,195 posts, read 47,082,143 times
Reputation: 13682
Our schools have a pretty stick dress code. But its really nothng compared to when I was a kid in school starting in the 50's when boys wore only long pants;polished shoes;button-up shirts and girls wore dressses.
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Old 12-18-2010, 09:27 AM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,023 posts, read 60,574,028 times
Reputation: 20180
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Hmmmn. When I was a kid, and used to see the parochial school kids waiting at the bus stop in their uniforms, I used to think how nice they looked.

When I was in my 20s and used to see policemen, firemen and soldiers in their dress uniforms, I used to think how handsome they looked. I still think they are all handsome. Even the milkman (you have to be old to appreciate that) looked handsome in his pure white uniform.

C'mon you guys! When you have your nurse and french maid fantasies are you thinking "totalitarianism" when you see their uniforms?

I don't think I've ever seen an ugly man in uniform...well, except for those tattooed grizzly mean men in their ugly orange prison jumpsuits.
Thanks for brining up nurse pornography! Maybe that's why nurses got into wearing scrubs.

Uniforms make people look, well, uniform. That's their purpose. People in uniforms are generally considered subservient. There has been a movement in nursing for years to get nurses out of uniforms, and some hospitals, public health agencies, etc do not require them. Once no longer required, people rarely wear them (to work).

That said, I'm actually better with school uniforms than I am with strict dress codes. I'd rather see them all look alike than in awkward looking clothes that no other kids their ages wear.
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Old 12-18-2010, 09:35 AM
 
270 posts, read 264,058 times
Reputation: 97

[SIZE=2]Top: Girls[/SIZE]
[SIZE=1]Solid color three-button pullover (or oxford cloth button down style shirt long or short [/SIZE]

[SIZE=2]Bottom: Girls[/SIZE]
[SIZE=1]Navy blue uniform pants. No skirts, skorts, or capri pants! [/SIZE]

[SIZE=2]Outerwear[/SIZE]
[SIZE=1]Solid Only: navy blue, red or black (jackets, sweaters, sweatshirts). Outerwear may Not have writing, fur, patches, emblems, brand names or advertisements visible anywhere on them. Wearing jackets inside out is NOT acceptable[/SIZE]

These are examples of a public school uniform for girls pulled from the website of Jeremiah Denton Middle School in Mobile, AL. As you can see, girls are not allowed to wear skirts at all in this case. The uniform consists of plain blue and no options to add a blazer, and jackets cannot be worn inside. In other words, the student can't look like a competent professional.
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