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Old 06-13-2011, 02:48 PM
 
1,428 posts, read 2,771,707 times
Reputation: 1460

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Well, the reason is simple. The prime objective for schools today is socialization, not education. You are graded largely on your ability to turn in assignments and follow instructions, not on your mastery of the material.

Case in point? We have two different sets of friends with daughters. They both are straight-A students. One has a 4.3 GPA. Yet their ACT scores are 22 and 24, respectively. Okay scores, but certainly inconsistent with what a straight-A student should be making.
Here is my question for your friends:

Did you immediately get on the phone to your child's school and demand an accounting?

Did you say, "Mrs. Principal, my daughter was led to believe by the grading practices of this school that she was not only above average in her abilities, but was in fact outstanding. Nevertheless, her ACT scores are only just above average when compared to a national norm. If we, her parents, had known years ago that her abilities were average, we could have taken reasonable steps to help her -- provided her with tutors, for example, or drilled essential skills in writing or grammar. Instead, the school fed us utterly false information.

"What right do you have as teachers and educators to feed us false information about our child's abilities -- only to let us twist in the wind, finding out about the real state of things years after this information would have been useful?"

"What would your response be, Mrs. Principal, to a doctor who told a patient who tested positive for cancer that everything was fine -- that everything was outstanding, in fact? What would your response be, Mrs. Principal, to a mechanic who looked at a cracked engine block and told the driver that all was well?

"You know what your response would be? What ours will be? Why, Mrs. Principal, we would sue."


Pardon my cynicism, but I'm guessing that your friends probably shrugged and said, "Oh, well, at least they got As." Do forgive my cynicism, and I say with all sincerity that I hope that I am utterly wrong.
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Old 06-13-2011, 06:03 PM
 
2,920 posts, read 2,906,142 times
Reputation: 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Wallace View Post
Here is my question for your friends:

Did you immediately get on the phone to your child's school and demand an accounting?

Did you say, "Mrs. Principal, my daughter was led to believe by the grading practices of this school that she was not only above average in her abilities, but was in fact outstanding. Nevertheless, her ACT scores are only just above average when compared to a national norm. If we, her parents, had known years ago that her abilities were average, we could have taken reasonable steps to help her -- provided her with tutors, for example, or drilled essential skills in writing or grammar. Instead, the school fed us utterly false information.

"What right do you have as teachers and educators to feed us false information about our child's abilities -- only to let us twist in the wind, finding out about the real state of things years after this information would have been useful?"

"What would your response be, Mrs. Principal, to a doctor who told a patient who tested positive for cancer that everything was fine -- that everything was outstanding, in fact? What would your response be, Mrs. Principal, to a mechanic who looked at a cracked engine block and told the driver that all was well?

"You know what your response would be? What ours will be? Why, Mrs. Principal, we would sue."


Pardon my cynicism, but I'm guessing that your friends probably shrugged and said, "Oh, well, at least they got As." Do forgive my cynicism, and I say with all sincerity that I hope that I am utterly wrong.
It's all, in the words of Diane Ravitch, institutionalized fraud. I resent being made to be complicit in it in order to be able to stay in the classroom. My own term is educational malpractice. That's what happens when you misrepresent busyness for mastery. People get so caught up in the grades that they lose sight of what the numbers are supposed to represent.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:42 AM
 
138 posts, read 188,120 times
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The public wants better education but parents only want to see A's & B's on Johnny's report card. Principals & school boards want happy parents to avoid lawsuits. As the story points out, teachers are being used as scapegoats by administrators and parents.

Good thing we are so focused on closing schools & firing teachers ... cause that's what's "really" going to change education.
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Old 06-14-2011, 02:49 PM
 
1,428 posts, read 2,771,707 times
Reputation: 1460
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
It's all, in the words of Diane Ravitch, institutionalized fraud. I resent being made to be complicit in it in order to be able to stay in the classroom. My own term is educational malpractice. That's what happens when you misrepresent busyness for mastery. People get so caught up in the grades that they lose sight of what the numbers are supposed to represent.
Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.

THIS. A million times THIS.
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Old 06-14-2011, 02:54 PM
 
11,614 posts, read 19,707,814 times
Reputation: 12046
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
It's all, in the words of Diane Ravitch, institutionalized fraud. I resent being made to be complicit in it in order to be able to stay in the classroom. My own term is educational malpractice. That's what happens when you misrepresent busyness for mastery. People get so caught up in the grades that they lose sight of what the numbers are supposed to represent.
I love my students but I am no longer teaching. This is part of my decision.
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