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Old 06-21-2011, 11:54 AM
 
9,454 posts, read 15,015,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Did she study the Civil War in that history class?

that's just my point---she didn't study the civil War, or anything in chronological order. Just studied, say, significant documents, like the Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence, she's in 8th grade. Ok, going into such detail and comparisons of historical documents would be good for a college-level class ( or at least hight school), but don't you think they should have an overview of the basics first? at least know what happened when and where,basic facts. I wince to realize, she doesn't have a clue, WWII was fought in my parents's generation, and my dh sweated his low lottery number for Viet Nam. all that was part of my family history, she barely realized WWII came after WWI I do think she knows when the war of 1812 was fought, but not a clue as to where!

BTW, I "discuss" history with my dd a lot, because I remember a lot of it! I lived through the Viet Nam era, and grew up hearing stories about WWI and WWII from my parents and grandparents, so its more like old family stories than actual "history" to me----guess I'm just an old lady!
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:59 AM
 
9,454 posts, read 15,015,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
That sounds like a very reasonable way to teach it, given that the Constitution owes a great deal to the Magna Carta. (and the Declaration of Independence can't really be studied without also looking at the constitution.) History doesn't exist in a void; the Constitution didn't just spring from out of thin air. Sounds like there was a problem with the connections, but the concept itself is valid, given that there are clear connections that can be drawn between all of the documents listed. You don't say how old she is, but if still in elementary school it could just be that they haven't learned about the Civil War yet; if in junior high or high school, then obviously something major was missed along the way. I wouldn't blame it on "creative" teaching, however. (and I also think that family involvement is essential -- parents should be introducing their kids to history, too, and bringing them to historic sites, etc. The fact that you and your daughter are discussing the Civil War -- even if she has a lot of ground to cover -- is a positive thing.)

I try to "fill in" her history lessons whenever I can. They were studying the Holocaust, but dd didn't realize it happened in WWII. She thought it was part of ancient times, was surprised it happened so recently. yes, people are alive today who lived through those times.

I find it incredible they can go on and on about the details of an event, such as the Holocaust, and fail to give a date in time. No, I'm not about memorizing dates, but one should at least have a basic feel, did it happen in ancient or modern times!

she asked the question about WWI---what were they fighting for? My answer, I don't rightly know, child, I don't rightly know...........guess some questions will never be answered!
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Old 06-21-2011, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
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Personally, I learned almost no history at school. The history I knew by age 18, I had either learned from my dad, from reading Pogo in the funny papers, or from other outside reading.

In school, history is taught the way foreign languages are taught. Not a living, dynamic system with interconnected parts, but tables of disassociated facts like conjugations of verbs.
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Old 06-21-2011, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,961 posts, read 98,795,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
I try to "fill in" her history lessons whenever I can. They were studying the Holocaust, but dd didn't realize it happened in WWII. She thought it was part of ancient times, was surprised it happened so recently. yes, people are alive today who lived through those times.

I find it incredible they can go on and on about the details of an event, such as the Holocaust, and fail to give a date in time. No, I'm not about memorizing dates, but one should at least have a basic feel, did it happen in ancient or modern times!

she asked the question about WWI---what were they fighting for? My answer, I don't rightly know, child, I don't rightly know...........guess some questions will never be answered!
I wouldn't worry about "filling in". She'll get more history in high school.
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Old 06-22-2011, 01:03 PM
 
Location: USA - midwest
5,945 posts, read 4,713,893 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
Yes you are right, competition never improves anything.....

Competition can improve competitive things. Education is a process, not a competition. Remember what I said about simple stuff? Education isn't one of those. Anyone who looks at it like it is only deceives himself.
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Old 06-22-2011, 02:22 PM
 
12,454 posts, read 27,069,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Personally, I learned almost no history at school. The history I knew by age 18, I had either learned from my dad, from reading Pogo in the funny papers, or from other outside reading.

In school, history is taught the way foreign languages are taught. Not a living, dynamic system with interconnected parts, but tables of disassociated facts like conjugations of verbs.
Our family eats dinner together most nights and a lot of those nights are spent in conversation about what my youngest son learned in his Social studies classes that day and the last three years have been AP classes. I've been very impressed with how he was taught and what he remembered. I don't know if my school was bad or his is very good, but he knows a lot more about what's going on in the world and the history of it then I ever did at his age.
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Old 06-23-2011, 07:20 AM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,797 posts, read 6,119,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wade52 View Post
Competition can improve competitive things. Education is a process, not a competition. Remember what I said about simple stuff? Education isn't one of those. Anyone who looks at it like it is only deceives himself.
The current monopolized system breeds slackers, this issue has been argued ad nauseam, but there is no denying the test scores.
There is absolutely no incentive for schools to improve performance.
Everything improves from competition.
Even doctors and hospitals improve from competition. It is just plain stupid to say schools are somehow different.
They will however say anything, to maintain their monopoly.
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Old 06-23-2011, 09:09 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,107 posts, read 39,170,046 times
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Someone mentioned about how things were "better" 30 years ago, well no they weren't. Kids that couldn't cut it dropped out and worked. As far as knowledge goes check out the second article here:
Class Struggle - Jay Mathews on education. - The Washington Post

"Is Knowing History So Important?"

As much as I hate using Matthews as a source it turns out that US students have never been knowledgable in history. Pre-WW I kids didn't know what happened in 1776 and confused Thomas Jefferson with Jefferson Davis. Pre-WW II students couldn't name the 13 original Colonies and thought we purchased Alaska from the Dutch and Hawaii from Norway.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:11 AM
 
39,020 posts, read 23,146,013 times
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History quizzes are available at

History.com Trivia

They aren't all that easy, and they are pretty broad as to what is "history". I mean, I missed the question on Bono's real name, but I'm not sure that U2 is a history topic.
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Old 06-23-2011, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,961 posts, read 98,795,031 times
Reputation: 31371
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Someone mentioned about how things were "better" 30 years ago, well no they weren't. Kids that couldn't cut it dropped out and worked. As far as knowledge goes check out the second article here:
Class Struggle - Jay Mathews on education. - The Washington Post

"Is Knowing History So Important?"

As much as I hate using Matthews as a source it turns out that US students have never been knowledgable in history. Pre-WW I kids didn't know what happened in 1776 and confused Thomas Jefferson with Jefferson Davis. Pre-WW II students couldn't name the 13 original Colonies and thought we purchased Alaska from the Dutch and Hawaii from Norway.
You scooped me! I was planning to post this article. (Will post it anyway.)

Fact Is, Students Have Never Known History : NPR

"The test called upon the students to identify at least two of the contributions to the political, economic, or social developments of the United States by such famous Americans as Lincoln, Jefferson, Jackson, and Theodore Roosevelt," an article in The New York Times reports. "Only 22 percent of American students had mastered enough history in their high school days to identify two contributions made by Lincoln to this country."

That article was published April 4, 1943.
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