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Old 06-30-2011, 11:58 AM
 
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I have a question?IB OR AP????WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE?

thank you
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Old 06-30-2011, 02:05 PM
 
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AP vs. IB? - Ask The Dean

I personally prefer the IB curriculum since it requires a great deal of writing and higher level thinking skills. I think that it puts less emphasis on exams and more on actual knowledge, but as with the APs, exams will count.
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Old 07-01-2011, 04:38 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Generally, IB is an integrated course of study crossing the academic disciplines. AP classes are more stand alone. An institution offering IB (and that has been certified to call itself an IB Diploma school) will issue an IB diploma. The students there have taken a bunch of courses labeled IB and accepted by the IB certifiers as such. They also have independent projects related to the program. The IB end of course exams are usually taken after 2 years in a course where AP classes are 1 year courses. Schools that offer IB have to go through site visits by IB certifying teams where schools that offer AP don't, although teachers have to submit course syllabi to the CollegeBoard for approval. No approval? No AP label. They also publish a list of schools and AP courses approved for those schools.

A kid could take 1 AP class, or 5 or 10 and would get a regular diploma (although many schools offer weighted grades for AP so his GPA would be higher). AP will also designate an AP scholar (score of 3 or higher on 3 or more AP tests).

As a note, and this is something I've run into professionally, colleges are much more likely to grant credit/exemptions for AP scores than IB.
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Old 07-01-2011, 07:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Generally, IB is an integrated course of study crossing the academic disciplines. AP classes are more stand alone. An institution offering IB (and that has been certified to call itself an IB Diploma school) will issue an IB diploma. The students there have taken a bunch of courses labeled IB and accepted by the IB certifiers as such. They also have independent projects related to the program. The IB end of course exams are usually taken after 2 years in a course where AP classes are 1 year courses. Schools that offer IB have to go through site visits by IB certifying teams where schools that offer AP don't, although teachers have to submit course syllabi to the CollegeBoard for approval. No approval? No AP label. They also publish a list of schools and AP courses approved for those schools.

A kid could take 1 AP class, or 5 or 10 and would get a regular diploma (although many schools offer weighted grades for AP so his GPA would be higher). AP will also designate an AP scholar (score of 3 or higher on 3 or more AP tests).

As a note, and this is something I've run into professionally, colleges are much more likely to grant credit/exemptions for AP scores than IB.
That has been our experience too--or at least they are looked upon as basically the same thing. In our area, generally the "bad" schools offer IB so they have programming for their top students. The "good" schools offer AP and college level classes either at the high school or the kids go to the college to take classes (4 year colleges, not community colleges here). An interesting side note, we recently visited Notre Dame and they give AP credit (placement, not transcript credit) but DON'T give credit for college level classes--but I think that is because most states do this at a community college level, not a university level.

Last edited by golfgal; 07-02-2011 at 06:52 AM..
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:45 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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This would be a good place to ask the question I have: is it possible for a homeschool student to take the IB or AP classes? At our public school, AP classes are offered with dual credit thru local universities so could a homeschool student contract thru the uni itself and fulfill the assignments on their own?
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:51 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Don't know about your particular college credit question, I imagine that it would be best answered by your local school system/college.

As far as AP tests go there is nothing from CollegeBoard that prohibits a student taking the relevant AP exam that has not been enrolled in an AP designated class. In fact, in the reports that AP Coordinators have to file there is a break out for home schooled students to be counted.

There are some timelines that have to be followed, though. If your homeschooled student wishes to take an AP exam you have to contact the local high school's AP Coordinator by mid-February or so. That's when the AP exams are ordered, up until about April 10. After that there is a late ordering fee of about $40/test. The coordinator has to make arrangements to administer the exam (that's not too hard, just put another seat in the testing room). If there are special needs those have to be reported in the previous Fall.

You as the parent are not allowed to administer the exam, the student has to go to a facility that administers the tests. The testing schedule is also set by CollegeBoard for the first 2 weeks of May on specific days for specific courses at specific times, In fact, the instructions to test takers state that if the test is not being administered on May___ at ____ AM/PM the student is to leave and call the CollegeBoard with the provided phone number.

The Tests this year were $87 each (@$54 for kids on free lunch). That price will likely go up next year.

Last edited by North Beach Person; 07-01-2011 at 09:59 AM..
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Old 07-02-2011, 06:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Don't know about your particular college credit question, I imagine that it would be best answered by your local school system/college.

As far as AP tests go there is nothing from CollegeBoard that prohibits a student taking the relevant AP exam that has not been enrolled in an AP designated class. In fact, in the reports that AP Coordinators have to file there is a break out for home schooled students to be counted.

There are some timelines that have to be followed, though. If your homeschooled student wishes to take an AP exam you have to contact the local high school's AP Coordinator by mid-February or so. That's when the AP exams are ordered, up until about April 10. After that there is a late ordering fee of about $40/test. The coordinator has to make arrangements to administer the exam (that's not too hard, just put another seat in the testing room). If there are special needs those have to be reported in the previous Fall.

You as the parent are not allowed to administer the exam, the student has to go to a facility that administers the tests. The testing schedule is also set by CollegeBoard for the first 2 weeks of May on specific days for specific courses at specific times, In fact, the instructions to test takers state that if the test is not being administered on May___ at ____ AM/PM the student is to leave and call the CollegeBoard with the provided phone number.

The Tests this year were $87 each (@$54 for kids on free lunch). That price will likely go up next year.
That is very true-you don't have to take the AP class to take the AP test and the score on the AP test is what colleges look at. They DO like to see that you took the classes but if it isn't offered at your school and you had a comparable class, you could see if you could take the test at another school in your area that is giving the test.

As far as a homeschooler giving the AP or IB classes, sure you could use the same curriculum but it wouldn't technically count as an AP/IB class because those classes have to be certified through those programs.
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Old 07-02-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,957 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Generally, IB is an integrated course of study crossing the academic disciplines. AP classes are more stand alone. An institution offering IB (and that has been certified to call itself an IB Diploma school) will issue an IB diploma. The students there have taken a bunch of courses labeled IB and accepted by the IB certifiers as such. They also have independent projects related to the program. The IB end of course exams are usually taken after 2 years in a course where AP classes are 1 year courses. Schools that offer IB have to go through site visits by IB certifying teams where schools that offer AP don't, although teachers have to submit course syllabi to the CollegeBoard for approval. No approval? No AP label. They also publish a list of schools and AP courses approved for those schools.

A kid could take 1 AP class, or 5 or 10 and would get a regular diploma (although many schools offer weighted grades for AP so his GPA would be higher). AP will also designate an AP scholar (score of 3 or higher on 3 or more AP tests).

As a note, and this is something I've run into professionally, colleges are much more likely to grant credit/exemptions for AP scores than IB.
Some high schools, such as Fairview HS in Boulder, CO, allow students to take IB classes w/o being in the IB program. Only some of the students even in the program get IB diplomas. My daughter had a friend who had to make a choice between doing the IB diploma and music, and chose music.
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Old 07-02-2011, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
As a note, and this is something I've run into professionally, colleges are much more likely to grant credit/exemptions for AP scores than IB.
This is very true. When I took IB classes in HS back in the late 90s, I got ZERO college credit. If I had taken AP, I would have started college at a sophmore level instead of a freshman with NO incoming credits.

My advice....AP 100%
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Old 07-02-2011, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by baily23 View Post
This is very true. When I took IB classes in HS back in the late 90s, I got ZERO college credit. If I had taken AP, I would have started college at a sophmore level instead of a freshman with NO incoming credits.

My advice....AP 100%
That depends on the college. Some colleges will not let you claim sophomore status, even if you have sufficient AP/IB credits to do so.
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