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Old 07-11-2011, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Originally Posted by sls76 View Post
Just trying to understand what these are. Apparently my son was placed in one for first grade (I heard this from a friend and not the school). He has no learning problems and is very bright. From what I am understanding our school has put all kids with learning problems in one (of five) class. Any information would be appreciated.
Some districts try to put one or two relatively high-functioning SpEd kids in each class, some group them together in one class and then fill out with Gen Ed kids. They refer to the latter as an "inclusion class", though "blended" is probably more accurate. I have not seen "inclusion classes" done particularly well in either of the districts we've lived in, though I'll entertain the notion somewhere they might be successful.
My daughter-- who technically has an IEP (for anxiety and adhd, as well as gifted programming) and has never been considered appropriate for self-contained, was in an inclusion class with a couple of kids with speech issues and learning issues, and several E/BH kids, two years of her five in public school.
IME, there is the potential for-- and reality of-- a lot of bullying and uncontrolled bad behavior, from both groups of kids and toward both groups. Without a classroom aide, there's no way I'd go for it, and even with one I'd be wary.

Last edited by Aconite; 07-11-2011 at 05:28 AM..
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Old 07-11-2011, 05:22 PM
 
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The inclusion class can be a blessing or a curse, and it mostly depends on the teacher. When done right it is a great environment for everyone. The teacher would be skilled in teaching everything multiple ways, verbally/visually/hands one etc. Would be receptive and notice different learning styles and would accommodate them. Would be understanding when someone needed extra help and would take the time, perhaps as others were working on a worksheet or similar, to give the needed extra help (instead of sitting at a desk). Those types of teachers are great. Ideally there would be a parapro. in the class also to assist with the children who needed it.
When the teacher is not as accommodating it can be awful. Or if there is not a parapro. in the room to help with the 5 kids who need the extra help....or if there are behavior issues that are too much for the parapro. to handle (or if the parapro. is not good at her job...)
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Old 03-02-2017, 03:29 PM
 
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I subbed today 5th grade gen ed 12 IEP students 3 severe behavior issues 2 students moderate to severe could not spell words like girl or him without support 20 regular kids 5 of which are GT. How this first year teacher can cope ??? Idk  I understand inclusion but without a in class SPED co teacher I agree this environment is madness!
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Old 03-02-2017, 05:24 PM
 
15,287 posts, read 16,833,735 times
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Originally Posted by Jdills336 View Post
I subbed today 5th grade gen ed 12 IEP students 3 severe behavior issues 2 students moderate to severe could not spell words like girl or him without support 20 regular kids 5 of which are GT. How this first year teacher can cope ??? Idk  I understand inclusion but without a in class SPED co teacher I agree this environment is madness!
That's a class of 32 which is absolutely outrageous. It should have a special education aide at the very least with 12 IEP students. I would not want to be the teacher in a situation like that.

Btw, my grandson has been in inclusion classes and never had more than 22 children in his class. Not sure if he had more than 4 on IEPs in those classes. He also has resource room for his math and his reading (he is currently in 6th grade) and those classes are quite a bit smaller.
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Old 03-03-2017, 09:16 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
That's a class of 32 which is absolutely outrageous. It should have a special education aide at the very least with 12 IEP students. I would not want to be the teacher in a situation like that.

Btw, my grandson has been in inclusion classes and never had more than 22 children in his class. Not sure if he had more than 4 on IEPs in those classes. He also has resource room for his math and his reading (he is currently in 6th grade) and those classes are quite a bit smaller.
Yes, it is outrageous, but it happens more than people realize. One year I had a class of 30 where 11 of my kids were on an IEP, and of course, no aide. I felt bad for everyone in that class, including me. Everyone was shortchanged, not because I didn't try, but because it was just not possible to meet everyone's needs no matter how much I tried. I was just thankful as a middle school teacher I only had to deal with it 45 minutes a day, I can't begin to imagine being an elementary teacher and trying to do that all day long.
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Old 03-03-2017, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
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My daughter was teaching music at an elementary school in Az. She taught somethinglike 35 different classes a week. From day 1 she had 4 or 5 SPED classes that included students who could not do much of anything at all. For some of the classes, her goal was get them to clap a basic rhythm, not sure she succeeded in all cases. She had no SPED training or experience no assistance. Just here you go - have fun.
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Old 03-03-2017, 04:42 PM
 
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At my school the inclusion classes have either an all day sped teacher plus a general education teacher or a sped teacher and assistant switch between 2 rooms throughout the day. Both types provide a special education teacher or a special education assistant in addition to the general education teacher all day.
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