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Old 07-10-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Virginia (again)
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Just trying to understand what these are. Apparently my son was placed in one for first grade (I heard this from a friend and not the school). He has no learning problems and is very bright. From what I am understanding our school has put all kids with learning problems in one (of five) class. Any information would be appreciated.
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Old 07-10-2011, 03:35 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
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School try (as part of other students IEP's ) to mainstream all kids, with wrap aound/support services in normal classes. That class is called a Inclusion class. The IEP kids are included in Normal class as opposed to be 'excluded' in a special ed only class rooms.
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Old 07-10-2011, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Virginia (again)
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Thanks. My question is is it normal to put all of those kids in one class and if so can it be done successfully without an aide (I don't know whether or not there will be one at this point)? My son actually has an IEP for speech (although I would think he is close to being out of speech) so I do understand IEPs a bit. I am just (of course selfishly) concerned that my son's academic and social needs will be met.
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Old 07-10-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
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Your Son's Class is 'normal' 1st grade class. Since he's the one with the IEP, he is being included in that class. My guess is he is pulled out of class at somepoint to work with the speech teacher. And his normal class room teacher works with the IEP, and also provides support in the classroom.
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Old 07-10-2011, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Virginia (again)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
Your Son's Class is 'normal' 1st grade class. Since he's the one with the IEP, he is being included in that class. My guess is he is pulled out of class at somepoint to work with the speech teacher. And his normal class room teacher works with the IEP, and also provides support in the classroom.
Okay. Thanks. That helps. I believe he was actually put in this class because I asked for a certain type of teacher (nurturing--our school is very accommodating to these types of requests) and this was the teacher that fit the bill the best. He was not in the inclusion kindergarten class and has had an IEP for three years. He reads several grade levels ahead so that was my main concern because I really know nothing about inclusion classes. Appreciate the feedback.
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Old 07-10-2011, 05:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sls76 View Post
Okay. Thanks. That helps. I believe he was actually put in this class because I asked for a certain type of teacher (nurturing--our school is very accommodating to these types of requests) and this was the teacher that fit the bill the best. He was not in the inclusion kindergarten class and has had an IEP for three years. He reads several grade levels ahead so that was my main concern because I really know nothing about inclusion classes. Appreciate the feedback.
An inclusion class can be good or bad or can make no difference at all. If the number of kids with IEP's who are "included" (probably not for speech but for other learning disabilities) is relatively small (like, maybe a third of the class), then that shouldn't make any difference academically. There has to be additional support in the classroom or it probably isn't meeting the requirements of the IEPs.

If the number of spec ed students is more than half the class, then that is not really inclusion - it's pull out, with some non-spec ed "included." I would be concerned about that academically.

The only other consideration would be if the IEP's include students with emotional disabilities or serious behavior problems, which can obviously affect all students. However, there is no guarantee that other classrooms won't have kids with those problems as well. Basically, it's a normal kind of classroom - you should keep an eye on it, but not assume that it's going to be a problem.
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Old 07-10-2011, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Whether or not their are paras/aides in the classroom depends on whether the students with IEPs' programs specify that they must be accompanied by such professionals.

In any classroom setting, be it one that features inclusion of students with special needs into a setting of largely neurotypical and nondisabled peers, a self-contained special education classroom, a mainstream setting with no students with special needs at all, whatever, is just that...a classroom setting. Because your child is sharing classtime with other students of a variety of skill levels, abilities, and exhibiting a wide range of behavior, there will be times when he's affected by the actions of others. This will happen no matter what type of classroom arrangement it is.
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Old 07-10-2011, 09:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sls76 View Post
Okay. Thanks. That helps. I believe he was actually put in this class because I asked for a certain type of teacher (nurturing--our school is very accommodating to these types of requests) and this was the teacher that fit the bill the best. He was not in the inclusion kindergarten class and has had an IEP for three years. He reads several grade levels ahead so that was my main concern because I really know nothing about inclusion classes. Appreciate the feedback.
It's not an uncommon practice to group sp ed students who need some extra assistance but can do fine in a regular classroom with help. If, for example, you have enough 1st graders at your school for 5 separate classes of 22-24 kids each and you have 6 students who need some extra support from an aide during class, putting them together makes sense. Some kids need full time 1:1 support from an aide just for them, but most don't. Much of the time, the aide can assist several students at once, alternating between helping them when they need it and observing when they're doing fine alone. So grouping the kids in one room means the aide (depending on the kids and their IEPs, there could just one or several) can always be available right there in the room for whoever needs it, rather than having to rotate between the 5 different classrooms throughout the day.
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Old 07-10-2011, 09:58 PM
 
Location: GOVERNMENT of TRAITORS & NAZIS
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Many school districts are filling general education classes with 5-10 special education students that have a total of 35-40 students. NO AIDES or other staff in the room. Imagine 10 special education students of all catagories in ONE room. Used to be just 10 special education students in ONE room, now they have 25-30 other students with them?? I wonder how thier IEP goals will be met and what about individualiuzed instruction? Not to say anything about the 25-30 general education students' educational opportunities.

As a SpEd teacher, I am all for inclusion---but putting 5-10 SpEd kids in one gen ed class? That is sheer lunacy...
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Virginia (again)
2,697 posts, read 7,611,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h886 View Post
It's not an uncommon practice to group sp ed students who need some extra assistance but can do fine in a regular classroom with help. If, for example, you have enough 1st graders at your school for 5 separate classes of 22-24 kids each and you have 6 students who need some extra support from an aide during class, putting them together makes sense. Some kids need full time 1:1 support from an aide just for them, but most don't. Much of the time, the aide can assist several students at once, alternating between helping them when they need it and observing when they're doing fine alone. So grouping the kids in one room means the aide (depending on the kids and their IEPs, there could just one or several) can always be available right there in the room for whoever needs it, rather than having to rotate between the 5 different classrooms throughout the day.
This makes sense. Thank you for the explanation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
Many school districts are filling general education classes with 5-10 special education students that have a total of 35-40 students. NO AIDES or other staff in the room. Imagine 10 special education students of all catagories in ONE room. Used to be just 10 special education students in ONE room, now they have 25-30 other students with them?? I wonder how thier IEP goals will be met and what about individualiuzed instruction? Not to say anything about the 25-30 general education students' educational opportunities.

As a SpEd teacher, I am all for inclusion---but putting 5-10 SpEd kids in one gen ed class? That is sheer lunacy...
Okay, that is outrageous. I am hopeful that this class will have < 20 students based on the size of the kindergarten classes, number of first grade classes and my understanding that the inclusion classes generally seem to be smaller from what I can tell. 35-40 kids would have my children in private school if at all possible.
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