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Old 09-07-2018, 02:09 PM
 
16,571 posts, read 14,026,756 times
Reputation: 20525

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokinouta View Post
Maybe they're heeding the advice of teachers on forums. Teachers seem to dislike parent involvement. Maybe they're hoping to avoid it with a good school so they don't feel the need to irritate others.

Forget Helicopter Parents - Say Hello to the Lawnmower Parent

"Hey, I've got an idea for a hot new toy: Primadona Barbie, and Snowflake Barbie. There could also be Son-of-Privilege Ken. His accessory car would be a Jaguar."
Primadonna isn't even spelled correctly. lol
"Don't forget Barbie's mom, Varna (short for Husqvarna) Del Toro and her prop, a Lawnmower"
I do believe they're missing "narcissistic Barbie"-you could add in!!

Parents, you don't want a Barbie named after you. lmao!

Which is it? You want parents involved or don't you? Parents seem pretty damned either way it seems.

My advice, look for the best school you can and just hope for the best.
Parent involvement should be inversely proportional to the age of the child.

So no it’s not either involved or not.

Isn’t the goal of all parenting to have children who don’t NEED you by the time you are done?

As an aside you didn’t spell it any more correctly. Prima donna is two words, not one.
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Old 09-07-2018, 02:38 PM
 
3,414 posts, read 922,250 times
Reputation: 1716
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Parent involvement should be inversely proportional to the age of the child.

So no itís not either involved or not.

Isnít the goal of all parenting to have children who donít NEED you by the time you are done?

As an aside you didnít spell it any more correctly. Prima donna is two words, not one.
Ah, Murphy's Law, indeed.

As an aside(,)you didn't do it any more correct.(-ly)


I do believe parenting differs depending on the child's needs. Your one size fits all approach just won't work. Maybe they just got so wrapped up in ripping the crap out of parents and children they stubbled into Murphy's Law themselves. It happens. Made me instantly think of "stupid teacher Barbie."

But hey, we aren't teachers. Just solidifies the need to find a good school, with well-educated teachers who actually take the job seriously. Not some burn out who will be making fun of you as you walk out the door. As a student I could tell who the teachers like that were, and so can parents.

That's why they look for a good school, with a good reputation. It does matter. Not everyone's child will be a joy, nor will every child's parent be a teachers dream parent but a good teacher will be able to handle those circumstances like adults.
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:27 AM
 
Location: The analog world
17,086 posts, read 9,818,525 times
Reputation: 22738
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Flock Of Budgies View Post
Come on what?

I am a high school teacher. Out of four classes only THREE sets of parents came to visit me during parent-teacher conferences to talk about their kids' education. Parents are NOT involved at the high school level. Hence, they don't give a damn.

You just made my point - parents are both working hard to support their narcissistic lifestyles.
That's not been my experience. Although we do not have parent-teacher conferences at the high school level, BTS night was very well attended. (Actually, it was a bit of a madhouse.) Volunteers at all levels are also plentiful, although certainly not in the classroom for the middle or high school. Instead, parents who want to stay involved shelve books in the library, run the school bookstore, plan teacher appreciation days, fundraise, organize after-prom, etc. As for me, I volunteer in the library, as I've done for many years. I enjoy contributing and getting to know the school staff, who are delightful and appreciative of my help. I also have had the pleasure of occasionally seeing my children during their day. I've never viewed any of my children's schools as "baby-sitting services," and given how many of us contribute our time to the district, apparently my peers don't either.

Last edited by randomparent; 09-08-2018 at 09:42 AM..
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:34 AM
 
4,329 posts, read 2,249,535 times
Reputation: 5578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
(Re: Upper middle class parents)
I'm curious how you know this. I probably fit in the upper middle class category (though not "truly wealthy"), and if I had to relocate with school age kids, I certainly wouldn't ignore the school issue altogether. I live in a district which is generally speaking upper-middle class (to varying degrees around the district) and of course the admin says there are no bad schools here. It's probably true. However, at least at the high school level, each school has its own "vibe". Some are very sports-minded, some are less sporty but more nerdy; some have great music programs with award winning groups, including one of the lower income (for here) schools), some have superlative music programs, and so forth.

I do not know anyone who ever sent their HS kid to boarding school. I worked with a group of doctors (not the "truly wealthy either, mind you) and most of them used some private schools, mostly religious.

In my area (mostly middle to upper class) the school district is the single most important decision you can make. There is not a huge variance at the elementary level but in Middle and High school it makes a really big difference in the quality of education. In the worst schools the kids constantly interrupt the teachers, don't do assignments, and don't participate in class. In the better districts it is the exact opposite.
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
5,129 posts, read 6,321,311 times
Reputation: 5980
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
That's not been my experience. Although we do not have parent-teacher conferences at the high school level, BTS night was very well attended. Volunteers are also plentiful, although certainly not in the classroom. Instead, parents who want to stay involved shelve books in the library, run the school bookstore, plan teacher appreciation days, fundraise, organize after-prom, etc. As for me, I volunteer in the library, as I've done for many years. I enjoy contributing and getting to know the school staff, who are delightful and appreciative of my help. I also have had the pleasure of occasionally seeing my children during their day. I've never viewed any of my children's schools as "baby-sitting services," and given how many of us contribute our time to the district, apparently my peers don't either.
This is very different from my local high school and many other ones that I'm familiar with in my area. I have three children who graduated from the local public high school. My wife and I usually attended the BTS night and parent teacher conferences. We usually ran into the same small group of parents. Some teachers would have no parents attend.

The only volunteers I'm familiar with are athletics and band boosters and post-prom. In elementary schools, the PTA will sometimes do plan teacher appreciation days. It sound like you're referring to a private school since I have never seen a volunteer in a school library, but I wouldn't be surprised if an elementary school did a grandparents' day where they came in and read to students. I have also never encountered a school bookstore. Some schools have school stores where they sell shirts and other items with school logos. They are usually run by the student council or some other student organization.
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: The analog world
17,086 posts, read 9,818,525 times
Reputation: 22738
Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
This is very different from my local high school and many other ones that I'm familiar with in my area. I have three children who graduated from the local public high school. My wife and I usually attended the BTS night and parent teacher conferences. We usually ran into the same small group of parents. Some teachers would have no parents attend.

The only volunteers I'm familiar with are athletics and band boosters and post-prom. In elementary schools, the PTA will sometimes do plan teacher appreciation days. It sound like you're referring to a private school since I have never seen a volunteer in a school library, but I wouldn't be surprised if an elementary school did a grandparents' day where they came in and read to students. I have also never encountered a school bookstore. Some schools have school stores where they sell shirts and other items with school logos. They are usually run by the student council or some other student organization.
Not a private school. It' a public school district in the Denver metro (on the other side of the city from Katarina Witt's home). There are hundreds of school volunteers across the district. And, yes, we have school bookstores that sell school supplies, books, and spirit wear. I volunteer in one of the libraries, and I am one of many who shelve books, arrange displays, do inventory, and complete other projects as needed.

Last edited by randomparent; 09-08-2018 at 11:00 AM..
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Old 09-08-2018, 10:54 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,913 posts, read 102,377,003 times
Reputation: 32972
I'll chime in now! My kids went to school in a district as randomparent said, at the opposite end of the Denver metro from her. We had BTS night in high school, it was usually a zoo! We also had parent-teacher conferences once a semester. They were well attended, sometimes you'd have to wait in line for a half hour or so to talk to the teacher for your 15 minutes.

There wasn't as much high school volunteering as middle school, and less middle than elementary. High school volunteer opportunities did tend more towards sports and one-time events, e.g. chaperone a dance. In MS it was still chaperoning field trips and the like, and in ele school there were tons of volunteer jobs, library, one time events, field trips, and much more!
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Old 09-08-2018, 11:27 AM
 
12,271 posts, read 15,146,666 times
Reputation: 8071
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Actually, I don't think the *upper* middle class are the ones who have an interest in the great schools website.

Looking for the best public schools for their kids is mostly a middle class thing, but you would be surprised at how many poor people also want the best public schools. The poor are limited by the fact that they cannot move to expensive neighborhoods, but.... in the suburban school I taught in, parents who had relatives in our suburb, often said that their kids lived with those relatives to get them into our suburban high school. It was a big problem because of the taxes when kids did not really live in our town, but most were never caught.
Really? Most school districts aggressively keep out nonresidents. Some hire detectives to weed them out. If the border patrol were as effective the number of illegal aliens coming into the country would be in single digits.
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Old 09-08-2018, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Maryland
1,715 posts, read 544,692 times
Reputation: 3781
When I went to college (I’m 70 now, retired) it was to a small place just working it’s way up to a 4 year degree institution. IIRC, tuition was like $300 semester(?). No reputation basically. I’m 70 now and retired and that education served me well. Like so many other things in life, it depends what you do with what you got. I cannot imagine going into debt the way folks do now. I think young folks who are wise with their money, taking all they can at a local community college, then transfer to a reasonably priced accredited school to get their degree, are on a track that could benefit many more people than it does. I think there’s too much focus on scholastic brand name.
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:16 PM
 
16,041 posts, read 17,828,786 times
Reputation: 15823
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Really? Most school districts aggressively keep out nonresidents. Some hire detectives to weed them out. If the border patrol were as effective the number of illegal aliens coming into the country would be in single digits.
The district did try, but being next to a big city made it difficult to catch these kids and they would not have hired detectives because that would probably have been a poor use of our tax money.
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