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Old 09-09-2018, 07:47 AM
 
991 posts, read 652,817 times
Reputation: 1671

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
So no documentation. OK.
Yep, just like you have “no documentation” to the contrary.
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Old 09-09-2018, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,886 posts, read 102,301,239 times
Reputation: 32946
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLDSoon View Post
Yep, just like you have “no documentation” to the contrary.
Burden of proof is on the one who makes the claim. Your job to support your claim, IOW.
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Old 09-09-2018, 10:33 AM
 
9,568 posts, read 5,764,693 times
Reputation: 9642
I think that most parents want to put their kids in the best schools they can possibly have access too. For the extremely wealthy, that often means private school. For the upper middle class, they can pretty much choose to live in the best school district and in the neighborhood which feeds into the best public schools. For the middle class they have a choice to live in a District with good schools. For the lower middle calls, they might not be able to afford to live in the District with the best schools so may have to settle for a district with decent schools. For the poor, they definitely have to settle for the worst schools.

Some parents who live in the Districts that do not have good schools will be able to choice into better options, some will not. I think most try to do the best they can in terms of choosing schools for their kids but whether or not they will be capable (aka$$$) of doing it is another matter all together. We have a very unequal system in terms of access to quality schools.

Last edited by MissTerri; 09-09-2018 at 10:55 AM..
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,949 posts, read 45,395,424 times
Reputation: 61438
It takes money to live in a district with great schools and the latest and greatest, because property taxes tend to be higher, even if the houses themselves are affordable, but that’s only one factor.

We always lived in nice, middle class towns with decent schools, but not country club schools. Just as important, was the fact that the communities we chose to live in were those in which families shared our values. We were involved, and so were most of the other parents. We exposed our kids to things, we taught them our values, we went to their sports activities. We baked the cupcakes.

Parental involvement is what makes the difference. These factors are what makes very poor disadvantaged children make it out of the worst neighborhoods and schools and succeed.
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:59 PM
 
1,877 posts, read 2,934,189 times
Reputation: 1555
As a teacher of now 15 years I've noticed that with the first child there is this driven overbearing concern for their kid to be in the best school with the best "reputation" in the best neighborhood. By kid 3 they drop the kid off on the corner and flip the local drunk a $20.00 and say see ya in a few hours.

In all seriousness the high school I teach at is fed by two middle schools. One middle school is roughly 80% white, probably 20% free/reduced lunch. The second middle school is roughly 60% white and definitely 60-70% free / reduced lunch. SO many of the parents in the first middle school try desperately to get their kid into a local charter school to escape having to go to high school with the racial minority types and or poor whites its almost tragically laughable. New age suburban white parents are funny to watch sometimes. At least their parents and grandparents were open about their racism and prejudice.

They remind me of the scene from Cruel Intentions where Mrs. Caldwell says "we're not racist, we gave money to colin powell"

I've never understood the notion that because the community is wealthy the schools must be excellent. Especially newly built schools in the last 10-15 years that have a predominantly transplant population. I mean the parents are successful we get it but that school they send their kids to didn't educate the parents did it? I mean the school wasn't even around. I'm continued to be impressed by parents who rip their child away from the urban / community school that educated them and helped them become successful and instead send their kid to a school that has no real proven track record other than other upper middle class parents are doing the same thing so why shouldn't we.

Also in 15 years of sociological study in the field of education I've come to realize that "excellent school" in an "excellent community" is simply code for "you'll love it, most of the kids are white and our minorities are really just our growing Asian population.....and by Asian I mean Japan and South Korea.......you'll love it!!!"
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Old 09-10-2018, 11:47 AM
 
16,567 posts, read 14,010,954 times
Reputation: 20518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokinouta View Post
Ah, Murphy's Law, indeed.

As an aside(,)you didn't do it any more correct.(-ly)
As an aside, I was not the one claiming to have superior grammar skills.

But as the word "correctly" was describing "spell", a verb, the adverb form is the right one. As in "you heard it correctly" vs "you heard it correct".

https://english.stackexchange.com/qu...d-it-correctly


Quote:
I do believe parenting differs depending on the child's needs. Your one size fits all approach just won't work. Maybe they just got so wrapped up in ripping the crap out of parents and children they stubbled into Murphy's Law themselves. It happens. Made me instantly think of "stupid teacher Barbie."
Murphy's law? What does the notion that "anything that can go wrong, will go wrong" have to do with any of this?

And how is the idea that parents should do less for their children as they get older "one size fits all"? Are there parents who are going to start doing more for their children as they get older? Dress them and tie their shoes for them as they are leaving for college? What you are suggesting does not even make sense.

Quote:
But hey, we aren't teachers. Just solidifies the need to find a good school, with well-educated teachers who actually take the job seriously. Not some burn out who will be making fun of you as you walk out the door. As a student I could tell who the teachers like that were, and so can parents.
Not for nothing, but many, many teachers are also parents. You seem to think that they are mutually exclusive groups, they are not. And as such, you may want to think about who actually has experience as both.
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:49 AM
 
Location: The analog world
17,087 posts, read 9,802,637 times
Reputation: 22736
This thread has completely gone off the rails.
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Old 09-11-2018, 08:05 AM
 
991 posts, read 652,817 times
Reputation: 1671
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
This thread has completely gone off the rails.

You’re right- forgot to ignore the irrelevant. Deleted my contribution to that.

Carry on...
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Old 09-13-2018, 09:47 AM
 
2,032 posts, read 2,407,023 times
Reputation: 1498
As a parent of two children (6, 10), we moved into a "highly ranked" school system (which we can barely afford!) for two predominant reasons:
1. Safety. I am far more concerned about the safety of a school than how many computer labs it has. I have worked in rougher schools before, and the general environment is completely night and day from our current district. If given the choice, and with the recognition that no place is 100% safe, who wouldn't prefer their kids be more safe than less safe?;
2. Connections. The friends my children make are more important than the curricula present at the school, in my opinion. Every school district has its "good" and "bad" crowds, of course, but graduation and college acceptance rates are decent-enough indicators, IMO, that the kids in our school district stay on the straight and narrow enough to at least graduate.
Ours is not a "super highly competitive" district, like some around us, but it checks the key marks that we wanted for our kids.
Both my wife and I have multiple degrees, which are strong indicators that our children will grow up educated. So, while we are involved, the classroom education concerns me less. What surrounds the classroom education is more important in many ways, I think.
For those who are critical or skeptical of my views, I urge you to spend some time in a struggling school then spend time in a high-performing school. If you visited us you could walk from the former type to the latter, they are so close. The distinction will be clear and obvious, and the reasons why people care about rankings will be self-evident.
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Old 09-13-2018, 11:51 AM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
7,207 posts, read 4,611,172 times
Reputation: 9251
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenvillebuckeye View Post
As a teacher of now 15 years I've noticed that with the first child there is this driven overbearing concern for their kid to be in the best school with the best "reputation" in the best neighborhood. By kid 3 they drop the kid off on the corner and flip the local drunk a $20.00 and say see ya in a few hours.

In all seriousness the high school I teach at is fed by two middle schools. One middle school is roughly 80% white, probably 20% free/reduced lunch. The second middle school is roughly 60% white and definitely 60-70% free / reduced lunch. SO many of the parents in the first middle school try desperately to get their kid into a local charter school to escape having to go to high school with the racial minority types and or poor whites its almost tragically laughable. New age suburban white parents are funny to watch sometimes. At least their parents and grandparents were open about their racism and prejudice.

They remind me of the scene from Cruel Intentions where Mrs. Caldwell says "we're not racist, we gave money to colin powell"

I've never understood the notion that because the community is wealthy the schools must be excellent. Especially newly built schools in the last 10-15 years that have a predominantly transplant population. I mean the parents are successful we get it but that school they send their kids to didn't educate the parents did it? I mean the school wasn't even around. I'm continued to be impressed by parents who rip their child away from the urban / community school that educated them and helped them become successful and instead send their kid to a school that has no real proven track record other than other upper middle class parents are doing the same thing so why shouldn't we.

Also in 15 years of sociological study in the field of education I've come to realize that "excellent school" in an "excellent community" is simply code for "you'll love it, most of the kids are white and our minorities are really just our growing Asian population.....and by Asian I mean Japan and South Korea.......you'll love it!!!"
+1. 1000% yes to all of this.
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