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Old 07-14-2011, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,285,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Can he follow 2-3 step directions (hang up your coat then go put your shoes in the box), can he sit and focus on a story being read for a reasonable amount of time, does he have self-control that is age appropriate--can he sit next to another child without having to poke that child or talk constantly to that child.
This. I just finished up my masters with several kindergarten teachers, and these are the things they stress for kindergarten readiness.

The children who struggle are often the ones whose parents were so overwhelmed (with work, babies, household tasks) that they did everything for the child because it was "faster" or "easier" that way. Start having your son help you make dinner, set the table, do multi-step tasks. Teach him impulse control and patience.

The academic skills come much faster when the foundation is there for learning.
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:34 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere Arkansas
3,326 posts, read 2,614,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Noel View Post
He knows his ABC's saying them writing them and picking them out when u ask him. He can count up to 14 with no problem and can write some of his numbers. He can Write his first middle and last name. know his pleases and thank yous and can talk very well and uses big words properly. knows how to dress himself and put his shoes on the right feet and eats with his forks and spoons and shares pretty well and listens pretty good. I just need to know if theres anything else he should learn before starting kindergarden please get back to me with ur answers thank you
Like others have indicated it would be best to wait another year. Elementary school can be a "boy unfriendly place." I say this if only because I've observed many examples of gender bias at the hands of female teachers. I say this as a male elementary teacher. Good luck with your decision.
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:31 PM
 
5,643 posts, read 5,106,164 times
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Even I'd he can handle it now, I would say proceed with caution. I agree with the person upthread who said it can catch up with them later. There are certain ages where kids tend to take developmental leaps in social maturity (I think one happens in the 3rd grade???) and sometimes kids who are on the younger end of the age range can fall out of step with their peers.
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Old 07-14-2011, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,964 posts, read 98,795,031 times
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There is an active thread on the parenting forum about this. I just found this article about "redshirting" kids. You might find it interesting. Most of the benefits are gone by 3rd grade.

Leaving a Child Behind Before Kindergarten (http://www.ncld.org/at-school/general-topics/early-learning-aamp-literacy/leaving-a-child-behind-before-kindergarten - broken link)

Some studies report that in the short run, redshirting can boost a child's confidence, improve academic learning, increase success with social interactions, and perhaps even boost popularity among peers. But the long term benefits of redshirting are not clear, and by third grade, there is no discernable difference between those children who had a late school start and those who did not.

When compared to their non-retained peers, children who were retained before kindergarten were sixty-six percent more likely to receive negative feedback from teachers during their later school years.

Students who are more than a year older than their classmates are more likely to drop out of high school.
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Old 07-15-2011, 05:00 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,363,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
There is an active thread on the parenting forum about this. I just found this article about "redshirting" kids. You might find it interesting. Most of the benefits are gone by 3rd grade.

Leaving a Child Behind Before Kindergarten (http://www.ncld.org/at-school/general-topics/early-learning-aamp-literacy/leaving-a-child-behind-before-kindergarten - broken link)

Some studies report that in the short run, redshirting can boost a child's confidence, improve academic learning, increase success with social interactions, and perhaps even boost popularity among peers. But the long term benefits of redshirting are not clear, and by third grade, there is no discernable difference between those children who had a late school start and those who did not.

When compared to their non-retained peers, children who were retained before kindergarten were sixty-six percent more likely to receive negative feedback from teachers during their later school years.

Students who are more than a year older than their classmates are more likely to drop out of high school.
But kids that are close to a cut off date are NOT "more than" a year older, they are the same age as the oldest kids in the class. Also, this does NOT hold true for kids with delays. These studies are done on kids that are average or better. From personal experience, kids that are far behind their peers will take a lot more grief and have a lot harder time ALL through school. For kids that are not ready for school, it will do them MUCH more harm to start early than it ever will to wait.
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