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Old 07-21-2011, 11:27 AM
 
3,779 posts, read 7,171,349 times
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It depends on the teacher, on the school, on the help available for the teacher, and on the children.

I taught a 1st/2nd combination class one year. It worked. (Almost killed me, but it worked.) I had a wonderful aide who was able to move around doing exactly what I would have been doing had there been two of me. The first graders did exceptionally well. The ones who didn't thrive were the lower second graders, who just needed more of my time and attention.

My niece was in a 2/3 combination (with two teachers) when she was in third grade. She experienced some frustration because it seemed like a repeat of second grade, and because sometimes the teachers would ask questions only second graders were allowed to answer - third graders had to sit and listen and not participate.
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Old 07-21-2011, 11:36 AM
 
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Is not about multi age, it is about the curriculum.

Do they have separate curriculum for each grade?
In my mind is like the teacher has double work to do. How she will do it without sacrifacing the time and quality?

Also, how can some kidz do math and some reading at the same time, in the same small class?
How can the teacher explain someting about science and other kidz write about hystory?

Why some kidz have the priviledge on beeing in normal class and some not?

I understand the only good side : good leadership skills and more friends...but I want education from school, I want knowledge, more than these at his age.

Beeing with lower grade I cannot see these achivements.
1 graders learn how to write "to be" and he makes book reports and reads atlases.
1 graders learn 2+3 and he know multiplication and a part of division...
Doesn't make sense to me how he will progress and I am so concern!

Thanks a lot for all your advices!
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Old 07-21-2011, 11:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post

My niece was in a 2/3 combination (with two teachers) when she was in third grade. She experienced some frustration because it seemed like a repeat of second grade, and because sometimes the teachers would ask questions only second graders were allowed to answer - third graders had to sit and listen and not participate.
This I considered is awfull!!!!

My son tried so hard 1 st grade. He didn't speak the language at the begining of the school year but , he worked very hard, extra homework, extra help from me, a lot of patience from the teacher and he finished on the top 4 in his class.
Actually half of his last trimester he was doing drawing, when the kidz had tests, because he passed all the tests ahead .

He is so proud of his efforts and wants to be on 2-nd grade with big boys..and he will feel like punished beeing with 1st graders.

Also, to sit and listen and not participate, is not like wasting time?
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Old 07-21-2011, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^While I certainly can't comment on a specific teacher's classroom, sitting and listening is NOT all bad. The multiage teachers in my kids' school were very committed to the concept. They pointed out that older kids helping younger kids reinforces the learning for the older ones, for example.
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Old 07-21-2011, 05:43 PM
 
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Why would a split class have any more sitting and listening than a single grade class? My kids split classes had lots of movement and my grandchildren's classes do also. Sitting and listening is not a big part of today's classrooms. Kids may sit to listen to a story for 15 to 20 minutes. They may sit and listen to explanations for 10 minutes before they start an activity. Kids are paired up or put into table groups and work on whatever subject they are working on.
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Old 07-22-2011, 11:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Why would a split class have any more sitting and listening than a single grade class?
The concern about this was because of my post about my niece's class, where the third graders had to sit through math lessons for the second graders and were not allowed to participate.

The problem is that when kids are not allowed to participate, some of them get the message, "This isn't for you; just sit there and be quiet." Enough of that and kids stop listening. Once you stop listening in school, it's hard to start again.

When I taught, if what I was saying was not for everyone, I didn't make everyone sit there and look at me while I said it. They were busy doing something else, so that no time was wasted. My niece's teachers (there were two for thirty-something kids) could have had the third graders practice their own math rather than sit and watch the second graders have their math lesson. Or one teacher could have taken the third graders (or some of them) to the other part of the large room for a different lesson.

At OP's son's school, the teachers may be very knowledgeable and skilled at teaching combination classes. It may be a great experience for the children. But it might not.

Michelle, do you know any other parents whose children were in a combination class? Do you know anything about the teacher who might be teaching the class? It might turn out to be a good thing. But if you prefer that your son not be in a split class, talk to the principal and request that he be in a class that is all second grade. (Some schools allow parents to give requests; some don't.)
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Old 07-22-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,590,043 times
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A school cannot be all things to all people. Some kids flourish in that kind of environment and some don't.

You are certainly within your rights to approach the school and express your concerns, and let them also explain to you how the classroom would be structured. Don't be afraid to change your mind it you find that your concerns are not grounded in reality.

I was a fifth grader in a split 5/6 class, and I loved it. I paid attention to the 6th grade lessons, and was stimulated by it.
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Old 07-22-2011, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,091 posts, read 3,067,695 times
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I was in a split 1/2 classroom when I was in first grade. I went ahead with the 2nd graders into 3rd grade at the end of that year.

My kids are going to be attending a small charter school for the first time this year, and they'll be in mixed 3rd-5th grade classrooms (I have one 3rd grader and one 5th grader). Since they've never before been grouped by age, I think this will be great for them.
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Old 07-25-2011, 10:29 AM
 
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What is the reason for the split class? If it is due to the number of students, lack of funding or lack of teachers there is nothing you will be able to do about it unless you can get the majority of the parents who children are affected by this to protest. We have different grades each year combined into a split class. What I have noticed is that the two classes seem to grow off of each other. The older class learns how to help younger students and cope with distractions more. Both classes learned patience more than other classes. The younger students learn to do much more on their own compared to "asking for help on every single question". All of my boys have experienced split classes, some positive some negative. Of course you have concerns as this is the first time for you. My suggestion would be try it out, it's 1st/2nd grade, a little early in the school career to be crying foul.
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