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Old 07-28-2011, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,021 posts, read 98,892,281 times
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I spent weeks and days having students research the cost/benefits of going to college and/or trade/tech. training programs. When they were witness to their executive parents, friends and teachers losing their jobs in this economy, they were much more receptive and selective about their education plans upon leaving high school.
Do you really think people in the trades are any better off during this recession? The statistics still show that those with a college degree have a lower unemployment rate.

BTW, my opinion on 'gap years' is low. Sometimes kids never get back to school. An 18 year old, living at home, thinks $10/hr. is a lot of money. It's only years later, when s/he can't find a better paying job that s/he thinks they "should have" gone to college.
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Old 07-28-2011, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Arkansas
1,229 posts, read 2,769,764 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do you really think people in the trades are any better off during this recession? The statistics still show that those with a college degree have a lower unemployment rate.

BTW, my opinion on 'gap years' is low. Sometimes kids never get back to school. An 18 year old, living at home, thinks $10/hr. is a lot of money. It's only years later, when s/he can't find a better paying job that s/he thinks they "should have" gone to college.

I know my husband (who is an Electrician and went to a 4 year trade school which is required in AR to be a Commercial/Industrial Electrician) and many of the guys he works with are all still working.

My husband did have a 3 month layoff back in 2009 (it was also during the winter which usually slows down some anyway) but he was still able to use his skill/trade to provide for us. When he found a new job it actually ended up having better pay/benefits that his previous one. He now travels all over the United States for work (and gets paid his hrly rate while traveling or working plus per diem). He traveled previously but did not get paid for it nor did he get per diem.
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Old 07-28-2011, 07:36 AM
 
541 posts, read 797,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do you really think people in the trades are any better off during this recession? The statistics still show that those with a college degree have a lower unemployment rate.

BTW, my opinion on 'gap years' is low. Sometimes kids never get back to school. An 18 year old, living at home, thinks $10/hr. is a lot of money. It's only years later, when s/he can't find a better paying job that s/he thinks they "should have" gone to college.


I'll give you one better. People having college degrees that aren't marketable especially in this economy are going to have a hard time no matter what trying to make more than 10-12 dollars an hour. A degree in something like English or sociology isn't going to get a person that far since they don't really have any marketable skills someone needs. On the other hand, someone who knows how to fix something or do something will be in demand because the person doing the hiring needs that someone to do/fix something.


You can't just use the old "go to college" gimmick, not when you have people with college degrees flipping burgers, working in retail, working as a bartender, working as a waiter, working in call centers, etc.

If you have a college degree with no skills, then you're s.o.l. and you're going to be kicking yourself in the butt for not going to a trade school and learning how to do something or majoring in something that gives you better job prospects. But you make mistakes, learn from them, and move on.
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Old 07-28-2011, 07:42 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,424,731 times
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Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
Would you consider that attitude to be owned by public school educators? I think a lot of parents and people in general (especially in certain areas) hold similar attitudes.
There was a post here or on another board about a mom telling her son that he should be an electrical engineer vs and electrician-the boy had done a summer internship with an electrician and loved it. They really are NOT the same thing. I commented that he would probably make more money as an electrician.

Our high school has all kinds of programs for kids with varying career goals. They can take classes like auto shop, CAD/drafting, welding, etc. at the high school or they can go to the community college and take other trade classes offered there and get dual credit for high school and college--so these kids graduated from college with their trade certificate basically. The vast majority of our students go on to a 4 year college, 94%, about 4% go on to community college or the military and about 2% go right into the workforce or whatever...
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Old 07-28-2011, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Ohio
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I would say yes because some people get tired of high school, and trade school is very practical and will give you a head start. You're applying yourself other than using mind power (not that it's not important). When you apply yourself, it becomes easier, and therefore, Trade School gives you that opportunity, but it's not for everyone.
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Old 07-28-2011, 11:57 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,424,731 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do you really think people in the trades are any better off during this recession? The statistics still show that those with a college degree have a lower unemployment rate.

BTW, my opinion on 'gap years' is low. Sometimes kids never get back to school. An 18 year old, living at home, thinks $10/hr. is a lot of money. It's only years later, when s/he can't find a better paying job that s/he thinks they "should have" gone to college.
I think the trade industries have been hit the hardest in this recession--many of which are more 'discretionary income' type services-electricians, plumbers, brick layers, etc.are all well employed during building booms but severely unemployed in recessions where people are not building homes, don't have the extra cash to have someone else fix something they they are doing it themselves, etc. We have friends that are plumbers/electricians. Our plumber friend's business is off 40% from AVERAGE and 75% from peak, electrician friend had to close down his business and got a job working for a company making less than half of what he made in his own business. These are pretty typical and our economy here is no were near as bad as it is in other parts of the country.
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Old 07-29-2011, 07:28 AM
 
Location: GOVERNMENT of TRAITORS & NAZIS
20,594 posts, read 22,750,207 times
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That wouild be great. I belive it should be a course of study starting 9th or 10 th grade. I would love to see ALL students take an class of "introduction to the world of the trades" type class.

Here in NC (in my area anyway) trade school seems to be an option for special ec students. MOst general ed students are pushed towards college--at least on the college type track and it is expected they "consider" college.

Not everyone wants, can afford or is college bound.
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Old 07-29-2011, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,731,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do you really think people in the trades are any better off during this recession? The statistics still show that those with a college degree have a lower unemployment rate.

BTW, my opinion on 'gap years' is low. Sometimes kids never get back to school. An 18 year old, living at home, thinks $10/hr. is a lot of money. It's only years later, when s/he can't find a better paying job that s/he thinks they "should have" gone to college.
Compared to who? Seriously, I don't know a single person with a skilled trade who lost their job but I know plenty of engineers who lost theirs. I still have the same plumber, furnace tech, mechanic and service rep at the dealership I had when the first recession started! While my brother used to be a mechanic, he was moved up to management. Now the recession has resulted in them making less money but they are still working. My step son is in infrastructure construction and he has more work than he can handle and has throughout the recession. Now, if he were in new home construction, that would be a different story.

In the meantime, we have downsized out our housekeeper and our lawn service. Both non skilled labor. I still have my financial advisor (the only degreed person I happen to employ).

I have two masters degrees and I've been let go from two jobs in the last four years. I'll likely be looking again either next year or the following (either that or buy into the teach to the bottom of the class mantra). I will likely have to leave the state or even the country to find work in engineering, while my neighbor, a millwright, is still working for the company I used to work for as an engineer!!!!

From where I sit, the skilled trades are much more stable. While people may put off cosmetic car repairs, during a recession, they keep their cars longer and have to do what they have to do to keep them running so the mechanic is safe. Recession or not, I have to have my furnace cleaned and water leaks fixed so my furnace guy and my plumber are safe (Neither of them is tied to new home construction. They just do home service.)

Medical is the only degreed area I see as stable at all.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 07-29-2011 at 07:47 AM..
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Old 07-29-2011, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,731,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
That wouild be great. I belive it should be a course of study starting 9th or 10 th grade. I would love to see ALL students take an class of "introduction to the world of the trades" type class.

Here in NC (in my area anyway) trade school seems to be an option for special ec students. MOst general ed students are pushed towards college--at least on the college type track and it is expected they "consider" college.

Not everyone wants, can afford or is college bound.
And people in the trades tend to have more career satisfaction and life satisfaction. My brother spent years in car body repair. He got a lot of satisfaction in fixing people's cars, made a decent living and never took his work home with him!! I have an engineering education worth over $50K and I ended up out of work. He dropped out of engineering school. Seems he made the better choice.
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Old 07-29-2011, 08:02 AM
 
12,455 posts, read 27,097,479 times
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Don't you all still have tech options for your high school students? We have this in my area: Lehigh Career & Technical Institute The campus adjoins the community college and students can take classes there too if they qualify.

As a parent, I find the attitude is changing from hoping that our kids go on to college to hoping they get a job, with benefits, whenever. After college, after high school - whenever.

I have nothing against a job in a trade if you have the aptitude for it. You can't turn a person that doesn't like to work with their hands into a plumber or carpenter.
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