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View Poll Results: Given two choices, which would you rather choose?
Option 1: The school year should begin in late September and end in early May 28 49.12%
Option 2: The school year should begin in the second week of August and last until the last week of June 29 50.88%
Voters: 57. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-15-2011, 09:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
While I like this, it will never float. It will play havoc on sports schedules and day care and you'd never get the breaks to align with major holidays that parents want their kids off for.

Anyone who thinks the school schedule is planned the way it is because it's good for education is a fool. It's planned so people have vacation time and major holidays off. I'd settle just for increasing to a 200 day school year. An increase of 20 days per year is the equivalent of two extra years of school by the time a student graduates!!!
I know it will never happen (for exactly the reasons you stated), but it is a shame. Students (like and adult schedule is now) should be at school for 7-8 hours/day, year round and then have work to do at home on top of that.
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:22 AM
 
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If you look at the KIPP acadamy (a charter school for 5th-9th graders), they implimented a 7:30am-5pm school day (with saturday classes), homework on top of that, a zero tollerance discipline program, they forced parents to be involved. In New York (the school is in the Bronx) last year, for example, 94 percent of KIPP eighth-graders scored at or above grade level on the state math test—and 78 percent did the same on the English test—while in the city as a whole, those numbers were 60 percent and 43 percent, respectively.
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,713,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
If you look at the KIPP acadamy (a charter school for 5th-9th graders), they implimented a 7:30am-5pm school day (with saturday classes), homework on top of that, a zero tollerance discipline program, they forced parents to be involved. In New York (the school is in the Bronx) last year, for example, 94 percent of KIPP eighth-graders scored at or above grade level on the state math test—and 78 percent did the same on the English test—while in the city as a whole, those numbers were 60 percent and 43 percent, respectively.

BUT!!!!!.... Public schools can't force ANYTHING. We have to educate everyone who comes through the door whether they do their homework or not, whether their parents are involved or not and it takes an act of God to expel a student. The best we can do is a longer school day/year but that's not much if you have students who are, deliberately, disruptive and can't do anything about it.
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
52 posts, read 96,674 times
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Thumbs up Nicely Put...

Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
How about "different". I think in the long run it would end up being a little longer but I would like to see trimester systems (we have this already) BUT a week or two break between the trimesters then about 6 weeks off in the summer. The only "days off" during the trimesters would be for actual holidays. The schedule could be structured so Christmas break fell as one of those two week breaks, etc. During those break times, teachers could do inservice, have parent/teacher conferences, etc.

Right now our current district has a day off here, a day off there type deal and it just is so broken up for learning, etc. It would also cut down on the days missed for kids for dr appointments, dentist appointments, etc. Vacations would be easier to plan--and at less busy times.
I totally agree with golfgal, If NYC adopted this idea, it would help the students more and I strongly believe the teachers wouldn't be so burnt out. I work in lower manhattan and when I talk to some of my other co-workers in the outer boros, the one thing they say is that they wish the kids went to school longer because retention of the material would be better.
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:31 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,017,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
BUT!!!!!.... Public schools can't force ANYTHING. We have to educate everyone who comes through the door whether they do their homework or not, whether their parents are involved or not and it takes an act of God to expel a student. The best we can do is a longer school day/year but that's not much if you have students who are, deliberately, disruptive and can't do anything about it.
I know the system isn't set up for this in any way....

I am all for enacting higher, more rigorous standards and simply holding everyone back who does not live up. The best thing to do might actually be to hold 15% of the population back a grade.
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
52 posts, read 96,674 times
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Question Only 15%

Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I know the system isn't set up for this in any way....

I am all for enacting higher, more rigorous standards and simply holding everyone back who does not live up. The best thing to do might actually be to hold 15% of the population back a grade.
You sure only 15%????? Having taught for about ten years, I am shaking my head.... I am one of those educators that stayed after til six just helping cause I knew some children needed it. Really needed it... But then I think of the parents and that is another thread...
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:43 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,017,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Joan 2010 View Post
You sure only 15%????? Having taught for about ten years, I am shaking my head.... I am one of those educators that stayed after til six just helping cause I knew some children needed it. Really needed it... But then I think of the parents and that is another thread...
I just made up a number for that...it might be more!
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,713,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I know the system isn't set up for this in any way....

I am all for enacting higher, more rigorous standards and simply holding everyone back who does not live up. The best thing to do might actually be to hold 15% of the population back a grade.
I'd be all for a system that did away with grade levels and replaced them with achievement levels but just holding kids back won't work. Holding a child back is akin to doing the same thing you did before that resulted in failure and expecting different results. You can't just have a child repeat what was done that resulted in failure. You'd need something different. Maybe kids who don't pass 1st grade go into grade 1B the next year which would be a class just for kids who didn't pass 1st grade the previous year where something different is tried.

While I do think that pushing kids forward is a problem, I don't think just holding them back works unless they're being held back to allow them time to mature or because they were just lazy and didn't do the work. If the child didn't get it this year, they won't get it next year either if all you do is repeat what was done before. You need intervention for these kids regardless of whether you choose to hold them back or push them forward. You need something different.
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Old 08-15-2011, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Virginia
7,894 posts, read 12,148,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
If you look at the KIPP acadamy (a charter school for 5th-9th graders), they implimented a 7:30am-5pm school day (with saturday classes), homework on top of that, a zero tollerance discipline program, they forced parents to be involved. In New York (the school is in the Bronx) last year, for example, 94 percent of KIPP eighth-graders scored at or above grade level on the state math test—and 78 percent did the same on the English test—while in the city as a whole, those numbers were 60 percent and 43 percent, respectively.
That's fine for where it's needed, but it isn't needed everywhere.
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Old 08-15-2011, 11:00 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,017,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
That's fine for where it's needed, but it isn't needed everywhere.
Where isn't it needed? Other than Japan?
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