U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Given two choices, which would you rather choose?
Option 1: The school year should begin in late September and end in early May 28 49.12%
Option 2: The school year should begin in the second week of August and last until the last week of June 29 50.88%
Voters: 57. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-15-2011, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
21,063 posts, read 15,248,216 times
Reputation: 11777

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
I prefer neither of those options. I prefer year round school with shorter breaks between the longer periods of school.
Same here.
School started for us today, goes until just before Memorial Day. I'd like to see them adopt a year-round schedule.

One of the magnet schools in my city does this now - the kids get a couple/three weeks off each quarter but it hasn't caught on with the rest of the public schools yet. Just a matter of time, I think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-15-2011, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
21,063 posts, read 15,248,216 times
Reputation: 11777
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I agree...Personally, I want to see a 6 weeks of school, one week off where students are in class for a full eight hours/day (8-5, with one hour for lunch).
You've got my vote
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 12:46 PM
 
5,210 posts, read 8,814,204 times
Reputation: 5865
Quote:
Originally Posted by sherrenee View Post
I am actually in favor of year round school but that wasn't an option on the poll.

I don't think there is anything wrong with having a job, but it shouldn't be just for summer, there is nothing wrong with working and going to school.

When I turned 16 I was required by my parents to get a part time job. My parents rule was that I went to school and made good grades (A's and B's) and worked a minimum of 20 hours a week while in school and 40 during the summers. I also particiapted in several clubs and was in choir through out high school. I also had to help around the house. I didn't have any younger siblings so that one was out.

I am very very thankful that I had parents who grew up "dirt" poor (they taught us how important work is and how live on very little) and that were tough on us. IMO kids today have it way to easy, a lot get out in the real world and have zero clue how to make a living or even do basic stuff for themselves in order to survive.
That is a very demanding schedule for a teenager.

Going to school full time, participating in several clubs and choir after school and then working an average of 4 hrs per week night (assuming you had weekends off) while maintaining a high GPA, plus doing chores around the house doesn't leave you very much time for homework or anything else. It must have been difficult to get your research papers written and other homework assignments done. I'm guessing that you probably didn't get very much sleep in those days.

I can't imagine a teenager trying to keep that pace up year round and for years on end...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,894 posts, read 12,153,223 times
Reputation: 3554
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
Where isn't it needed? Other than Japan?
In my building we have very few discipline problems. Any that we have are very minor (talking in the hallway, too loud in the cafeteria, etc). The parents are involved. In 18 years maybe a handful have missed Back to School night. We are shocked if a parent doesn't show up for a conference. Out of approximately 120 third graders, less than ten were reading below grade level. Grades 3-6 consistently score between 92-100% passing on state tests with a large % receiving pass advanced scores. What reason would we have to move to a 9.5 hour school day plus Saturday?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,894 posts, read 12,153,223 times
Reputation: 3554
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I agree...Personally, I want to see a 6 weeks of school, one week off where students are in class for a full eight hours/day (8-5, with one hour for lunch).
Ugh. My elementary students begin at 8:35 and seem pretty tired by 3p.m. I don't think I could get another 2.5 hours out of them.

An hour is too long for lunch. 30 minutes is plenty.

If the student day was 8-5, what would be the hours for staff?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 01:29 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,021,468 times
Reputation: 5443
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
In my building we have very few discipline problems. Any that we have are very minor (talking in the hallway, too loud in the cafeteria, etc). The parents are involved. In 18 years maybe a handful have missed Back to School night. We are shocked if a parent doesn't show up for a conference. Out of approximately 120 third graders, less than ten were reading below grade level. Grades 3-6 consistently score between 92-100% passing on state tests with a large % receiving pass advanced scores. What reason would we have to move to a 9.5 hour school day plus Saturday?
I am 25 years old. I skipped two years of math, and finished calculus as a high school junior. That being said, I am very average in the math and science fields with my co-workers from Korea/Japan/China/India. I am one of two Americans in my office that can keep up with them regarding math. Our standards (as a country) are extremely low. We should have longer days simply to keep up with globalization.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
Ugh. My elementary students begin at 8:35 and seem pretty tired by 3p.m. I don't think I could get another 2.5 hours out of them.

An hour is too long for lunch. 30 minutes is plenty.

If the student day was 8-5, what would be the hours for staff?

Most people in the business world work 50ish hours/week. That isn't unreasonable (especially for a profession that gets so many days off). We would obviously need more teachers, however.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,722,259 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I am 25 years old. I skipped two years of math, and finished calculus as a high school junior. That being said, I am very average in the math and science fields with my co-workers from Korea/Japan/China/India. I am one of two Americans in my office that can keep up with them regarding math. Our standards (as a country) are extremely low. We should have longer days simply to keep up with globalization.





Most people in the business world work 50ish hours/week. That isn't unreasonable (especially for a profession that gets so many days off). We would obviously need more teachers, however.
Most teachers I know are well over 50 hours a week as things are. If you make face time 40 hours a week, we'll be well over 60 hours per week. Overworking teachers is not conducive to good teaching. As a matter of fact, just the opposite. I'm pretty typical. I spend a couple of hours a night working on lesson plans and such and then do my grading in blocks over the weekend. I really can't afford 10 more hours of face time a week. Now if you want to give me one more hour face time and another hour prep...we can talk.

The problem is you're forgetting the hours teachers already work prepping and grading after hours and you're forgetting that teachers need to be at school 30 minutes longer than the students on each end of the day so a teacher's duty week would be 45 hours without considering grading and prepping done at home.

Oh, and people are paid for the hours they work in the business world. When I was an engineer, if I worked 50 hours a week, 5 of those hours would have been at time and a half. a 42.5 - 45 hour work week was typical and paid no overtime but, after that, OT or comp time kicked in. If you gave me comp time (on top of typical vacation time) for every hour over 45 I work per week during the school year, you'd have to lengthen the year in order to give me time to take all the comp time. The summer and breaks are not enough to cover it.

I don't support a longer day, I support a longer year. If memory serves me correctly, Japan has a shorter school day but a longer school year. Students are tired after 6 hours of instruction. I can't imagine how burned out they'd be after 8 hours of instruction. I'd rather see 6 more weeks added to the school year. We really don't need 15 weeks of vacation time plus holidays. 6 more weeks would result in one more year of education time (compared to a 180 day school year) every 6 years. That's two full extra years of instruction, PLUS you'd be minimizing time to forget.

Now I can see lengthening the day if it is to give students a supported block in which to do homework. Many students do not have support at home for getting it done. I can't, however, see subjecting students to two more instructional hours per day.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 08-15-2011 at 01:46 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 01:37 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,021,468 times
Reputation: 5443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
Most teachers I know are well over 50 hours a week as things are. If you make face time 40 hours a week, we'll be well over 60 hours per week. Overworking teachers is not conducive to good teaching. As a matter of fact, just the opposite. I'm pretty typical. I spend a couple of hours a night working on lesson plans and such and then do my grading in blocks over the weekend. I really can't afford 10 more hours of face time a week. Now if you want to give me one more hour face time and another hour prep...we can talk.
True, but no other profession gets so much time off per year...Everyone else works 50ish hours/week with only two weeks vacation every year. And no, no one gets overtime in the business world. No one at my company is an hourly employee.

Personally? I work 55ish hours/week with two weeks vacation per year. I get paid for a 40 hour week.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,722,259 times
Reputation: 14499
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
True, but no other profession gets so much time off per year...Everyone else works 50ish hours/week with only two weeks vacation every year. And no, no one gets overtime in the business world. No one at my company is an hourly employee.

Personally? I work 55ish hours/week with two weeks vacation per year. I get paid for a 40 hour week.
Not true. I had more time off as an engineer. I had six weeks vacation plus three weeks of holidays and I never worked weekends I wasn't paid for or offered comp time for (this was after 17 years in service. A new hire would have up to 4 weeks vacation (depending on whether or not they purchased vacation time) and the same 15 holidays). As a teacher, I have 13 weeks off plus 5 holidays BUT I work, at least, six weeks worth of weekend days during the school year. So, not counting ANY work I do in the evenings at home or staying after school during the week, I'm down one week vacation/holiday time over what I would have had as an enginer, PLUS, I had 5 personal days and unlimited sick days as an engineer. I have 2 personal days and 10 sick days as a teacher. Edited to add: How does the pay compare you ask???? I make half of what I did as an engineer as a teacher. So even if I had 10 weeks more vacation as a teacher, they'd be VERY EXPENSIVE VACATION weeks.

I'm not kidding that you'd have to make the year about 60 weeks long just to give me the comp time I'd have coming, on top of a normal vacation schedule, if you comped every hour over 45 I work as a teacher during the school year. And this is before I take the classes that are REQUIRED to keep my certification. I figure I'm owed 12 weeks comp time on top of the six weeks vacation I would have had if I'd stayed in engineering and two weeks of holidays. The Saturday's and Sunday's we work should be taken off of our vacation total and when you do that, you'll find that we don't have as much vacation time as everyone else. I would, however, settle for being paid like I was as an engineer which would be my base salary for the first 45 hours and then time and a half for every hour after that. I could actually afford to send my kids to college then.

Teachers don't have a lot of time off. We just shift time. We work it during the school year and then take it back in the summer. The first six weeks of my 10 week summer vacation are just getting back the weekends I worked during the school year. The next six, oh wait, I don't have a next six...but I digress...give me back the hours I work in the evenings on school nights..... In the end, I'm left with one weeks vacation and 5 holidays... I think that's less than most people get. I wouldn't mind if they paid me like I work 55 hours a week but they pay me like I only work the 35 hours a week the kids are in school.

My husband works about 50 hours a week (paid 70% more than me) and has 2 weeks vacation, about 10 holidays, 5 personal days and unlimited sick days.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 08-15-2011 at 02:11 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,291,482 times
Reputation: 3648
'nother vote for year 'round. Today was the first day of our modified summer school (taught just before school begins this year). I had the honors math class, and began my course with a basic review topic from last year. About half the kids had zero clue what I was talking about. These are honors kids--they will pick it up by the end of the week and be good to go, but that's a wasted week that could have been spent going forward after just a day of review instead.

Selfishly, as a teacher, I'd LOVE a year 'round calendar. But only my school--not the whole country Then I could take cheap cruises and find good airfare during non-peak times, instead of fighting everyone for European vacations in July.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top