U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-21-2011, 09:10 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,615 posts, read 21,813,132 times
Reputation: 44513

Advertisements

Didn't read the entire post, but in short no. My children can not even read cursive.
Public schools do not put a great emphasis upon handwriting.

Personally. I like cursive, but it's a dieing art. I think it will go the way of calligraphy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-21-2011, 09:24 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,243,162 times
Reputation: 12496
Quote:
Originally Posted by Americanwoman54 View Post
Well, my students don't have to write those in cursive, but we do look at some of the great love letters written, and they are in cursive. All I am saying is that when something is written in cursive (if it is legible!), the message gives off a different "feel" to the reader. The medium DOES help to make the message. There are not grammar rules for this; it is just like what others have said, it is more "civil" perhaps because going back in history, that is how the monks sorta wrote and then educated masses. Does that make sense? And did you read what I had written about my students and their pen-pals? When people see real handwriting, they get a glimpse into that person's personality-a "feel" for that person....and that adds so much more to the missive. Can you see my point, maybe??
That sounds nice (no sarcasm intended). I'm sure it's a nice skill to have, but it's like riding a bike. Great if you know how to, but not the end of the world if you don't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2011, 09:35 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,515,057 times
Reputation: 4494
Seems a shame to see script fall out of favor. My grandmother, in particular, had the most beautiful handwriting. Such a pleasure to re-read her letters from long ago. E-mail just isn't the same.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2011, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Arizona
1,206 posts, read 2,098,595 times
Reputation: 1529
My daughter started learning cursive in 3rd grade in Oregon. We now live in Arizona and they are teaching her cursive there also.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2011, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,045,237 times
Reputation: 2725
Horrible. Its part of the dumbing down of society IMO.

It's not really the cursive per se, but whats bad is kids lose their sense of history. i.e., this is the new normal. It seems like they keep getting rid of things, but what are they adding? Anything? More tests maybe.

What if kids have to research old letters written by hand...from the 19th century? Are they not suppose to be able to understand it? Don't you see hand written letters all the time on the auction block, like an abraham lincoln letter for $30,000? Its the way people wrote for a long time.

Can you imagine a world where kids don't know cursive? It sounds Orwellian.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2011, 06:20 AM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,738,575 times
Reputation: 6677
We've had a few teachers try to squeeze cursive in (we're in Oregon) but they seem to run out of time. Usually what's happened is the teachers just had the practice worksheets available for kids if they wanted to learn it. They could take them home and practice on their own and with their parents.

My boys weren't interested in learning cursive at all and I didn't push it, so they both print. Gotta choose your battles, and we parents have a lot of battles on our plates currently as it is these days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Virginia
7,895 posts, read 12,168,874 times
Reputation: 3554
Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
We've had a few teachers try to squeeze cursive in (we're in Oregon) but they seem to run out of time.
We are supposed to teach it, but I have to admit that I do see that starting to happen with cursive. It also happens with health lessons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2011, 09:49 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,031,551 times
Reputation: 5443
What exactly is the point of cursive? Why would I ever need to know it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2011, 10:08 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,909 posts, read 58,045,364 times
Reputation: 29367
The Palmer Method:

Palmer Method - YouTube

(turn volume down)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2011, 10:12 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,909 posts, read 58,045,364 times
Reputation: 29367
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
What exactly is the point of cursive? Why would I ever need to know it?
You're right of course. For that matter, why learn to add or multiply when we have calculators so readily available?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top