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Old 08-25-2011, 12:59 PM
 
9,897 posts, read 6,595,358 times
Reputation: 2519

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
Because it is one of the easiest degrees to obtain.
Let's be fair - that can be said about a lot of degrees.
While discussion about unions, appreciation of teachers
etc has merit, this is about the appropriateness of
"on demand gift giving".

Teaching can be considered a thankless job for
some, but so can many other fields: doctors, housewives, clergy, politicians, policeman, fireman, garbage men, postal workers, you name it....the list goes on. Teachers do not have the market cornered on selfless acts, nor job stress.

Many folks thank them often, and without cue - and that
is the way it should be
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:04 PM
 
1,759 posts, read 1,696,625 times
Reputation: 945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
Because it is one of the easiest degrees to obtain.
LOL.
That would depend on the state, I suppose. I got my teaching degree in NJ.
I got a Masters,
went through (and paid for) all the standardized testing,
did all the requisite student teaching,
got all the background checks,
taught for a full year under a mentor AND THEN was able to receive a teaching degree.

I am no longer teaching. I never will again.

It was incredibly inappropriate for the teacher in the OP's post to do all that, and it infuriated me (as a parent) to read it.
I too am sick of being "asked" to give a certain amount, x-amount of times a year, to either the teacher or the classroom.

BUT as far as the classroom supplies, that is not a teacher's fault
and yes, teachers pay for so many things out of their own pockets.
This is the school district's fault.
Rework yer damn budget so that you aren't paying x-amount of bilingual staff because parents come here illegally, won't learn English, etc. and you need to communicate with them and their kids.
Demand that every student who attends your school is in the district legally so that you don't have too many students to provide for but insuffient amount of tax money with which to pay for them.
Trim P.E. ... Kids can and should get their exercise at home.
Free periods are a waste.
On and on and on.
We the parents and taxpayers have had it.
(Don't even start me on tenure and how it protects awful teachers who need to be removed.)

HOWEVER, do not blame the teachers in most of these cases
and certainly
do not even THINK "quitcher bitchin."

BECAUSE teachers are expected to not only handle the regular course of things in the classroom, work many many hours outside school (even on weekends, you just don't see it), etc
but also
have to handle all the undisciplined brats that so many parents are churning out these days,
parents who don't want to dampen their kids' spirits,
who don't ever use the word "no,"
who come up with some disorder or another with which to label said brattiness,
who medicate these kids instead of attempting to, you know, curb their sugar intake or the rest of the crap they eat...

Some of YOU should try spending just 1/2 an hour in a classroom today
and see how long you last. Best of luck!
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
Reputation: 6479
Quote:
Originally Posted by pollyrobin View Post
Let's be fair - that can be said about a lot of degrees.
Only about the liberal art degrees, of which Education is one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pollyrobin View Post
While discussion about unions, appreciation of teachers etc has merit, this is about the appropriateness of "on demand gift giving".

Teaching can be considered a thankless job for some,
Considering the quality of the product they produce, what is there to thank? Should we be thanking teachers that Johnny cannot read his own high school diploma? Should we be thanking teachers that Sally has to use a calculator because she is incapable of performing basic mathematics?

As baby-sitters teachers are over paid. When they actually start imparting basic knowledge and information to students then you will have cause to thank them, but not until then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pollyrobin View Post
but so can many other fields: doctors, housewives, clergy, politicians, policeman, fireman, garbage men, postal workers, you name it....the list goes on. Teachers do not have the market cornered on selfless acts, nor job stress.

Many folks thank them often, and without cue - and that
is the way it should be
If a police officer refuses to enforce the law and allows criminals to get away, do you thank them? When a fireman stands and watches your home burn to the ground, do you thank them? When sanitation workers refuse to pick up your garbage for weeks on end, do you thank them? Of course not, that would be incredibly stupid. When they actually do their job, and do it well, THEN they are worthy of our thanks. It is no different for teachers.
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:19 PM
 
4,989 posts, read 4,486,895 times
Reputation: 4568
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
Because it is one of the easiest degrees to obtain.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alltheusernamesaretaken View Post
LOL.
That would depend on the state, I suppose. I got my teaching degree in NJ.
I got a Masters,
went through (and paid for) all the standardized testing,
did all the requisite student teaching,
got all the background checks,
taught for a full year under a mentor AND THEN was able to receive a teaching degree.

Some of YOU should try spending just 1/2 an hour in a classroom today
and see how long you last. Best of luck!

There are definitely some teachers with excellent education backgrouds, but what Glitch said it not without merit:

Quote:
“Low grading standards in university education departments are part of a larger culture of low standards for educators, and they precede the low evaluation standards by which teachers are judged in K–12 schools. The culture of low standards for educators is problematic because it creates a disconnect between teachers’ perceptions of acceptable performance and the perceptions of everyone else.
The Culture Of Low Standards And Significant Grade Inflation For America’s College Education Majors

I would like to see us change the teaching profession be more like Japan, where the teacher gets a degree in a certain discipline and then apprentices with a teacher for a year. That seems to work well there. Of course, Japanese children are also not taught that they are the center of the universe, as so many American children are. Japanese culture in general would provide for a better learning environment- less discipline problems, more respect.

I would not want to teach for even 1/2 a day. I have tremendous respect for wonderful teachers!
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
Reputation: 6479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alltheusernamesaretaken View Post
LOL.
That would depend on the state, I suppose. I got my teaching degree in NJ.
I got a Masters,
went through (and paid for) all the standardized testing,
did all the requisite student teaching,
got all the background checks,
taught for a full year under a mentor AND THEN was able to receive a teaching degree.

I am no longer teaching. I never will again.

It was incredibly inappropriate for the teacher in the OP's post to do all that, and it infuriated me (as a parent) to read it.
I too am sick of being "asked" to give a certain amount, x-amount of times a year, to either the teacher or the classroom.

BUT as far as the classroom supplies, that is not a teacher's fault
and yes, teachers pay for so many things out of their own pockets.
This is the school district's fault.
I agree with it being the school district's fault in regard to school supplies. The school should be paying for all the supplies teachers require to do their job.

I am responsible for providing all the supplies necessary to do my business. In some cases the cost can be passed on directly to my clients, if their needs are specific. General supplies, such as paper, toner, paper clips, staples, etc., etc., come out of my pocket but are tax deductible.

Perhaps if school districts refuse to keep their teachers adequately supplied, the teachers could form their own company and deduct the cost of those supplies they had to purchase from their taxes. Special costs, such as field-trips or school outtings, should be at the cost of the parent. Not the school or the teacher.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alltheusernamesaretaken View Post
Rework yer damn budget so that you aren't paying x-amount of bilingual staff because parents come here illegally, won't learn English, etc. and you need to communicate with them and their kids.
Demand that every student who attends your school is in the district legally so that you don't have too many students to provide for but insuffient amount of tax money with which to pay for them.
Trim P.E. ... Kids can and should get their exercise at home.
Free periods are a waste.
On and on and on.
We the parents and taxpayers have had it.
(Don't even start me on tenure and how it protects awful teachers who need to be removed.)

HOWEVER, do not blame the teachers in most of these cases
and certainly
do not even THINK "quitcher bitchin."

BECAUSE teachers are expected to not only handle the regular course of things in the classroom, work many many hours outside school (even on weekends, you just don't see it), etc
but also
have to handle all the undisciplined brats that so many parents are churning out these days,
parents who don't want to dampen their kids' spirits,
who don't ever use the word "no,"
who come up with some disorder or another with which to label said brattiness,
who medicate these kids instead of attempting to, you know, curb their sugar intake or the rest of the crap they eat...

Some of YOU should try spending just 1/2 an hour in a classroom today
and see how long you last. Best of luck!
I have spent much more than a mere half-hour in a classroom teaching, but it is not what I prefer. I much rather do something, than teach others how to do something. As the adage goes, "Those who can, do. Those who cannot, teach."
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:57 PM
 
1,759 posts, read 1,696,625 times
Reputation: 945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
As the adage goes, "Those who can, do. Those who cannot, teach."
A disrespectful and ignorant adage, at that.

How did anyone learn to do what they do to begin with?
Sometimes, experience.
Other times, teachers.

And to insinuate that teachers teach what they do not know how to do?
Ludicrous and illogical.
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Old 08-25-2011, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
Reputation: 6479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alltheusernamesaretaken View Post
A disrespectful and ignorant adage, at that.

How did anyone learn to do what they do to begin with?
Sometimes, experience.
Other times, teachers.

And to insinuate that teachers teach what they do not know how to do?
Ludicrous and illogical.
As teachers teach less and less these days they make themselves more and more irrelevant. More and more students are being educated at home, or learning more through experience than they are being taught in a formal classroom setting.

As to teachers attempting to teach about topics they know little or nothing about, that happens far more often in college or at universities than at high school or grade school.
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Old 08-25-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: California
29,580 posts, read 31,907,081 times
Reputation: 24725
I never gave my kids teachers anything except once when a pushy room mom cornered me and I made a donation to buy the teacher a plant. I can't remember the occasion.

But I was a classroom volunteer and a couple times brought in a box or supplies for the class becasue I had extra money and it was no big deal for me to buy a box of gluesticks and whatnot. In middle/high school they always asked for a cash donation up front for certain classes that used "out of the budget" materials and I always gave the recommended donation amount.
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Old 08-25-2011, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
679 posts, read 508,953 times
Reputation: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alltheusernamesaretaken View Post
LOL.
That would depend on the state, I suppose. I got my teaching degree in NJ.
I got a Masters,
went through (and paid for) all the standardized testing,
did all the requisite student teaching,
got all the background checks,
taught for a full year under a mentor AND THEN was able to receive a teaching degree....

No, you didn't THEN get your teaching degree, you got your teaching Certificate. His statement still stands, Education DEGREES are an easy degree to get.
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Old 08-25-2011, 02:38 PM
 
Location: #
9,605 posts, read 14,273,941 times
Reputation: 6260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
As I read this thread I am left wondering why any reasonably intelligent and well qualified person would want to be a teacher
You really have to love it. Teaching has to be your religion.

The main question most of us teachers have is why doesn't a country of reasonably intelligent people value teachers a lot more?
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