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Old 08-29-2011, 09:11 PM
 
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I home schooled my oldest daughter through 3rd grade. She went to public school for a few months for K then went back to start 4th grade. I am not a fan of public schools. I feel they have lowered the bar and teach to the bottom of the class. When I was in school we were grouped together by our abilities. I may have been in the B(middle) group for K but then moved to the A (smartest) group for 1st grade. Now a teacher will have 10 C kids, 10 B kids and 5 A kids. The teacher will focus mostly on the 10 C kids so they will be able to pass the end of the year test. The B kids will get by and learn a couple of new things and the A kids will be bored to death but who cares because they will pass the test anyway.
I also really do not like the AR level reading the kids must get points for. I wanted my child to love reading, not be so worried about making sure a book was on her level, worth so many points and that the school had the AR test for her to take.
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Old 08-29-2011, 10:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reloop View Post
I see a lot of curricula which are little more than an inch thick and a mile wide.
Oh, yes. Big time.
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Old 08-29-2011, 10:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by FelixTheCat View Post
Is this a joke
I say we take a vote.
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Old 08-30-2011, 07:36 AM
 
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One of my concerns with home schooling is that the child will only have 1 teacher for their entire childhood (maybe two if the spouse helps out). I'd imagine that the child will have a difficult time when faced with a teacher that isn't mom or dad. Such as when it really counts and they go to college.

I went to a smaller college where I was actually taught 100% by the professors and not professors' aides. That's as close to "one-on-one" as a student will get. And the professor will not change his teaching methods if the student "doesn't get it." He will just go on. Without his personal teacher there to "hold his hand," it may come as a complete shock that the student doesn't recover from.

It is likely that a home-schooled through high school child would probably have a great understanding of many of the general subjects that other high school students should have. However, very little of that will land a child their first career job. They will need to learn to be taught by someone other than their personal teacher.

If I was home schooling, I'd consider sending my kids to "traditional school" once every three years for either a full year or a semester to get reacquainted with other children and to be exposed to other teaching methods.

For people that home school due to the parents' disagreement with the school's curriculum (usually subjects like evolution and history), in my opinion, that is one of the worst reasons to home school. Sheltering a child from the world like that is doing them a disservice. Why shouldn't a child learn these controversial things? Should a child just stick his head in the ground and block out all topics that Mom and Dad feel are controversial? They need to learn both sides of a controversial topic in order to understand why one side is "right" and the other side is "wrong." Otherwise, its just brainwashing.

I'd like to make a new word up: diseducation. That's what home-schooling is IF the parents are doing so for the sake of sheltering their child from controversial topics.
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Old 08-30-2011, 08:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by dspguy View Post
One of my concerns with home schooling is that the child will only have 1 teacher for their entire childhood (maybe two if the spouse helps out). I'd imagine that the child will have a difficult time when faced with a teacher that isn't mom or dad. Such as when it really counts and they go to college.
That's not necessarily true. My dd is 5 and she's already had other teachers then myself due to classes at the local parks and rec, story time at the local library, etc. I also consider myself her Mom, not her teacher. My role in homeschooling is more of a facilitator which means that sometimes I might help her sign up for classes that she is interested in taking. My experience is in line with the homeschoolers I know in my area and I know that she will be involved in many more activities and classes outside of the home led by teachers and facilitators other then myself as the years go by.

Quote:
I went to a smaller college where I was actually taught 100% by the professors and not professors' aides. That's as close to "one-on-one" as a student will get. And the professor will not change his teaching methods if the student "doesn't get it." He will just go on. Without his personal teacher there to "hold his hand," it may come as a complete shock that the student doesn't recover from.
I was also taught by professors', not aides. I don't see this being a problem for homeschoolers. Generally speaking, homeschoolers tend to do quite well at the college level.

Quote:
It is likely that a home-schooled through high school child would probably have a great understanding of many of the general subjects that other high school students should have. However, very little of that will land a child their first career job. They will need to learn to be taught by someone other than their personal teacher.
I disagree.

Quote:
If I was home schooling, I'd consider sending my kids to "traditional school" once every three years for either a full year or a semester to get reacquainted with other children and to be exposed to other teaching methods.
Homeschooled children don't need to go to school in order to interact with other children or be exposed to different teachers.
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Old 08-30-2011, 09:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FelixTheCat View Post
Is this a joke
The Only thing that is a "joke" is the Satanist Socialist Agenda for Public Non Christian schooling and the Anti Christian parents who Force their Satanist Beliefs on our Young Believers
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Old 08-30-2011, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Originally Posted by Jazzii View Post
Do you guys worry about the social aspect of it? Like if a kid is homeschooled isn't it easier for them to not see the real world as in bein introduced to different people and different forms of working together and collaborating as well as negotiating when working in undesirable conditions?
My kids have been exposed to a much wider range of people (different ages, different cultures, social circles, religions) while homeschooling than they have been in the public school system. That having been said, the one big group underrepresented in homeschooling circles is kids from disadvantaged/socially stressed backgrounds. Finding that group is rarely a problem in our district's school system. Most of the time, when I hear people questioning homeschoolers' exposure to "diversity", it comes down to "when are they going to get exposed to kids from the ghetto?" Like it's some kind of social inoculation or something. Either that, or the questioner has bought into the They're ALl Christians in Denim Jumpers stereotype of homeschool. Your question may not come from that POV, but I figured it warranted addressing, anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyndsong71 View Post
Most of the homeschoolers that I know who have children with disabilities, find that other homeschoolers and their children are much more accepting and tolerant of their children than those in traditional schools. So they actually are much less isolated because they are homeschooled. I have seen kids with all sorts of various "social issues" go from being extremely introverted to very outgoing because of being around other homeschoolers.
::nodnod:: I've seen this with a number of kids.

One thing to bear in mind is that a lot of kids are not just homeschooled or just public schoolers. Especially in middle and high school, a huge number are either dually enrolled, or homeschool for awhile, then go to school for a year or so, or some other combination. The latter involves a lot more work in sticking directly to state standards, and not moving too far ahead, but it can be done.

Last edited by Aconite; 08-30-2011 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 08-30-2011, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
It is true however that home-schoolers need a cohesive community of their own, otherwise they risk social isolation.
Most of the homeschoolers I know-- including my own kids-- have developed friendships with people in all sorts of situations. There's no law that says "public school kids must only hang with public schoolers, Catholic kids with friends from parochial school, preppies with preppies, homeschoolers with homeschoolers"...or even that friendships have to be chronologically homogeneous.
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Old 08-30-2011, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,168,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I have known homeschooled students to participate in school plays, band, chorus, athletics...all things that cannot be provided in a homeschooling environment. Not all parents/students make use of this, but it has been an option for all.
Some of that actually can be, and is. There are homeschool sports leagues in this area, and dramatic groups. Admittedly, it's hard to field a hundred or so kids for a really good band, though. (Maybe an orchestra. We have an over-abundance of violinists and cellists among our friends.)
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Old 08-30-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,168,679 times
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Originally Posted by 1208 View Post
Because the Liberal Education System failed to instill the Values of Jesus Christ and taught Satanist anti-American Socialist lies and Did Not teach the Word without which we are all Lost so we brought his Children home to be taught the Right and Only Way and Lord it has been Difficult because little Samantha insists on learning maths which are Unknowable for a girl and has been Brainwashed to think she can be a Banker and I must Pray every Night for her Salvation and little Jonah is Cursed with the Wandering Eye and must be instructed from two Directions at once to capture his Attention but Lord we will Persevere amen

Quote:
Originally Posted by FelixTheCat View Post
Is this a joke
Yeah, there are some of those folks, too. But they no more represent All Homeschoolers Everywhere than class-cutting crack babies with visible underwear do all public schoolers. For that matter, some of the most extreme <insert religious group here> folks I've met were public schoolers. They just spent a lot of time lobbying the principal and school board to make the joint sanitized for their convenience. Probably in some places it works.
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