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Old 09-03-2011, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX!!!!
3,765 posts, read 7,876,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Its all conjecture unless someone has some actual data??

The only thing I could find was

Homeschooling in the United States: 2003 - Executive Summary

Which listed 72% of people listing religious reasons as why they homeschooled even if it was not the only reason. So for the majority of homeschoolers religion is certainly a key reason for homeschooling.
????

From the link you provided
"Parents were then asked which one of the applicable reasons they considered to be their most important reason for homeschoolingó31 percent of homeschooled children had parents who cited concern about the environment of other schools, such as safety, drugs, or negative peer pressure, as the most important reason for homeschooling and 30 percent had parents who said the most important reason was to provide religious or moral instruction (table 4). While these were the two most common responses, another 16 percent of homeschooled students had parents who said dissatisfaction with the academic instruction available at other schools was their most important reason for homeschooling.

Only 30% say the most important reason is religion and 31% say safety drugs peer pressure. So right there more people cited nonsectarian reasons over religious reasons.

And just to clarify it was religious OR moral reasons in that 30%. I could argue that even though we don't believe in god per se, we still had moral reasons for taking him out of school. The public schools here ignore character trait education and that is something that troubles me. My son's new school, without religious indoctrination, emphasizes character development and incorporates it into everything. The importance of integrity, honesty, and perseverance are woven into the lesson plans.
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Old 09-03-2011, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX!!!!
3,765 posts, read 7,876,098 times
Reputation: 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted2helping View Post
In my area, East TN, I would have to agree, most other home schoolers appear to be Christian and promoting those values and education. I feel that I am in the minority because out of all the reasons we chose to home school, religion was not even on the list.

Again, this is just in my area, according to the resources I have come across and other home schoolers I have met locally.
It certainly depends where you live. We live in Austin, TX and this is not the case. Also there is a growing number of homeschoolers in the Bay area of California and they do it for non religious reasons as well.
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Old 09-03-2011, 10:41 AM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
1,935 posts, read 3,719,793 times
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If any of you homeschooling parents are willing to answer a question that is minimally off topic, tell me: How many hours per day (or per week) do you generally spend, working at homeschooling?

My wife and I don't have any kids yet but we're debating homeschooling... my mom thinks it's too work-intensive... I know nothing about it. Do you have to "work" for 6-8 hours per day, just like the length of a regular school day, to accomplish everything that needs to be accomplished?
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Old 09-03-2011, 11:45 AM
 
16,021 posts, read 17,810,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RomaniGypsy View Post
If any of you homeschooling parents are willing to answer a question that is minimally off topic, tell me: How many hours per day (or per week) do you generally spend, working at homeschooling?

My wife and I don't have any kids yet but we're debating homeschooling... my mom thinks it's too work-intensive... I know nothing about it. Do you have to "work" for 6-8 hours per day, just like the length of a regular school day, to accomplish everything that needs to be accomplished?
No, most homeschoolers don't seem to work that long per day. There is really no such thing as a typical homeschooling day. Here are some blogs that may help answer your question.

A Typical Homeschool Day? : Robin’s Blog

Babycenter also has several homeschooling boards where you can ask about these things.

Secular Homeschooling - BabyCenter
Unschoolers - BabyCenter
First Time Homeschooling for New Parents - BabyCenter
Catholic Homeschoolers - BabyCenter
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Old 09-03-2011, 06:34 PM
 
16,568 posts, read 14,010,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennibc View Post
????

From the link you provided
"Parents were then asked which one of the applicable reasons they considered to be their most important reason for homeschoolingó31 percent of homeschooled children had parents who cited concern about the environment of other schools, such as safety, drugs, or negative peer pressure, as the most important reason for homeschooling and 30 percent had parents who said the most important reason was to provide religious or moral instruction (table 4). While these were the two most common responses, another 16 percent of homeschooled students had parents who said dissatisfaction with the academic instruction available at other schools was their most important reason for homeschooling.

Only 30% say the most important reason is religion and 31% say safety drugs peer pressure. So right there more people cited nonsectarian reasons over religious reasons.

And just to clarify it was religious OR moral reasons in that 30%. I could argue that even though we don't believe in god per se, we still had moral reasons for taking him out of school. The public schools here ignore character trait education and that is something that troubles me. My son's new school, without religious indoctrination, emphasizes character development and incorporates it into everything. The importance of integrity, honesty, and perseverance are woven into the lesson plans.
What was stated was that the majority of homeschoolers choose to due to religious reasons. If you actually look at table 4 (which you included in your quotebut did not read??) it shows that the majority of parents cite religious reasons. It may not be their "most important" reason but over 70% of them cited it as a reason they come school.
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Old 09-03-2011, 10:31 PM
 
12,879 posts, read 15,357,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RomaniGypsy View Post
If any of you homeschooling parents are willing to answer a question that is minimally off topic, tell me: How many hours per day (or per week) do you generally spend, working at homeschooling?

My wife and I don't have any kids yet but we're debating homeschooling... my mom thinks it's too work-intensive... I know nothing about it. Do you have to "work" for 6-8 hours per day, just like the length of a regular school day, to accomplish everything that needs to be accomplished?
I took my first son out of school when he was in grade 3 and couldn't read...He home schooled for 4 years..became an excellant reader, and then went back to school for the last 5 years...My oldest daughter home schooled for those 4 years as well...just because she wanted to.....then along came my 2nd son...he tried school...but because he was such a tall young fellow and big...and towered over his peers...there were a lot of little jerks that wanted to fight him....he wasn't learning much...so out he came, and did his last 11 years at home, and graduated(he now holds an excellant job, and is well liked by his peers......my 2nd daughter went to public school for 9 years...excellant student...but got tired of the many enequalities and hypocracies she would have to deal with in the public system...she got tired of wasting her time...she is now completing her schooling at home...........On average if your child does 4 hours/day...they'll probably finish ahead of time....the education is in my opinion much better...and no time is wasted on field trips...and goofy electives that your child could learn as well or better at home....it's very rewarding, and very pleasing to not have to send your child out the door every morn.
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Old 09-04-2011, 06:45 AM
 
4,267 posts, read 5,296,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RomaniGypsy View Post
If any of you homeschooling parents are willing to answer a question that is minimally off topic, tell me: How many hours per day (or per week) do you generally spend, working at homeschooling?

My wife and I don't have any kids yet but we're debating homeschooling... my mom thinks it's too work-intensive... I know nothing about it. Do you have to "work" for 6-8 hours per day, just like the length of a regular school day, to accomplish everything that needs to be accomplished?
Like nana said, there is no typical homeschooling day but even if you were trying to recreate school at home and teach exactly what was being taught at your local public school you wouldn't have to factor in things like taking attendance, switching classrooms, waiting in line, etc. Assuming that your child is at least average you could get through the lessons at a much faster rate then you would be able to do if you were trying to teach a classroom full of kids. FWIW, the law in my state says, 4 hours per day.
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Old 09-06-2011, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,661 posts, read 3,642,084 times
Reputation: 10613
Quote:
Originally Posted by RomaniGypsy View Post
If any of you homeschooling parents are willing to answer a question that is minimally off topic, tell me: How many hours per day (or per week) do you generally spend, working at homeschooling?

My wife and I don't have any kids yet but we're debating homeschooling... my mom thinks it's too work-intensive... I know nothing about it. Do you have to "work" for 6-8 hours per day, just like the length of a regular school day, to accomplish everything that needs to be accomplished?
When we homeschooled, we spent about 1 1/2 to 2 hours per day on "sit down work." Granted, the kids then pursued their own activities for an hour or two or six... anything from drawing to dancing to looking up definitions to foreign words to reading to working on 4-H projects... and on and on. And of course we sometimes did science experiments or read historical fiction and did other things that did not fall under "sitting down and doing your work."

This is our first year not homeschooling (the kids are in a tiny charter school), and they're in the 5th and 3rd grades, so those estimates applied to elementary-aged children.
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Old 09-07-2011, 12:03 PM
 
624 posts, read 1,074,438 times
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"If I clean my own pool and mow my own yard, the pool will be cleaner and the yard will be manicured better." If you put your kid in a public school remember that these schools are a business. They might give you the impression of love and caring, but as a retired teacher most of my attention ended up with behavior problems or the kids who were way behind academically. You will teach you kid better 1-1 , than a teacher who has 20, 25, 30 kids in a class. Plus secular schools teach that your son/daughter came from a monkey. It will also teach them that 2 men having sexual relations should not only be tolerated, but that is a perfectly acceptable lifestyle. It will teach to the state tests and emphasize algebra over logic and order with numbers. I could go on and on.
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:23 PM
 
108 posts, read 168,712 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
So that I wouldn't have to explain to them that we didn't descend from chimpanzees, that homosexuality is not normal or acceptable behavior, that US history did not begin in 1965, that we owe allegiance to God, family and nation, and that no one owes us anything. Things like that.

See, now you are fitting the homeschool stereotype to a T. That they don't believe in science or in anything having to do with logic, and are narrow minded bigoted bible thumpers. I know not all homeschoolers are like that, but this is the image many people think of when they think homeschooler.
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