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Old 09-02-2011, 05:28 PM
 
31 posts, read 43,809 times
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two weeks in and I still don't have iep or bip for any of my students. schedules are still changing and our sped personnel can't even get the software they need to access the info. don't assume its the teacher's fault. I've been begging for mine so I can make sure my kids get the help they need.

 
Old 09-02-2011, 06:22 PM
 
624 posts, read 1,047,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
The above advice is good.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post

For perspective, I'm a teacher, and I'll not only be reading IEPs over the holiday weekend, I'll be writing IEPs. Depending on timelines, other people on the IEP teams' schedules, the speed with which documentation filters through the system to get to the right people, etc. holidays that involve doing work are not uncommon in this field. Just a friendly reminder against assumptions.

All things being equal, I wouldn't go into a new situation already looking for hostility. Teamwork is imperative for the appropriate development and implementation of an IEP. Starting out the year already looking for where battle lines could be drawn doesn't serve anybody well.


Most special education teachers have a computer program called SEIS. The teacher has all the student information already in the computer. The teacher basically has to update the student test results and add goals and objectives. It is a very simple program and the workload is very low. Special education teachers use the "too much paperwork" to justify teaching 8-10 students per class. Most SPED classes come with an adult instructional aide as well. Most regular education teachers have classroom of 30-38 in a high school class. I have seen the Administrator in an IEP meeting briefly scan the paperwork. It is not that difficult unless the parent is asking for extra services that will cost the school district money.
 
Old 09-02-2011, 06:29 PM
 
3,764 posts, read 7,212,943 times
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My experience has been that the SpEd teacher contacts me during before school teacher prep days to alert me to any special needs in my upcoming class. Then shortly after that I receive a copy of the IEP.
 
Old 09-02-2011, 06:32 PM
 
2,922 posts, read 2,915,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbill View Post

Most special education teachers have a computer program called SEIS. The teacher has all the student information already in the computer. The teacher basically has to update the student test results and add goals and objectives. It is a very simple program and the workload is very low. Special education teachers use the "too much paperwork" to justify teaching 8-10 students per class. Most SPED classes come with an adult instructional aide as well. Most regular education teachers have classroom of 30-38 in a high school class. I have seen the Administrator in an IEP meeting briefly scan the paperwork. It is not that difficult unless the parent is asking for extra services that will cost the school district money.
This is not true in my state. I don't even know if the special ed teachers know who their students will be. I got my IEPs last week, only two weeks after school started. I thought that was early. Our class size is capped at 33 by the state, but most regular ed classes at my school are in the 23-30 range. I just got to take some desks out, as my largest class just dropped to 25. The only instructional aides we have are an interpreter for a deaf student and a classroom aide for the self-contained class of severely disabled children. State law mandates that there is a minimum amount of floor space for each child, which limits the enrollment to 8-12 or so. Given that each child has serious challenges, I think it is appropriate to limit the number of children that at teacher is assigned at one time.
 
Old 09-02-2011, 08:14 PM
 
11,151 posts, read 13,812,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbill View Post

Most special education teachers have a computer program called SEIS. The teacher has all the student information already in the computer. The teacher basically has to update the student test results and add goals and objectives. It is a very simple program and the workload is very low. Special education teachers use the "too much paperwork" to justify teaching 8-10 students per class. Most SPED classes come with an adult instructional aide as well. Most regular education teachers have classroom of 30-38 in a high school class. I have seen the Administrator in an IEP meeting briefly scan the paperwork. It is not that difficult unless the parent is asking for extra services that will cost the school district money.


I have a small special education class because it's self-contained and the students all have full scale IQs under 60. Would you prefer that they be placed in a regular classroom? And, no, there's no aide of any kind in the class.

Our regular ed classes typically max out at 25, but we do have some with 27 or 28 kids. Most of the regular ed classes with sped kids have a full-time special education teacher in the classroom, so the ratio ends up being closer to 13:1.
 
Old 09-02-2011, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,827 posts, read 39,473,952 times
Reputation: 48645
,
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbill View Post

Most special education teachers have a computer program called SEIS. The teacher has all the student information already in the computer. The teacher basically has to update the student test results and add goals and objectives. It is a very simple program and the workload is very low. Special education teachers use the "too much paperwork" to justify teaching 8-10 students per class. Most SPED classes come with an adult instructional aide as well. Most regular education teachers have classroom of 30-38 in a high school class. I have seen the Administrator in an IEP meeting briefly scan the paperwork. It is not that difficult unless the parent is asking for extra services that will cost the school district money.
The above does not apply to my situation, which is the only one to which I can speak. I don't work for a public school with a traditional special education department, and wouldn't speak for one. I work for a highly specialized private school that truly individualizes education for severely developmentally disabled students.

I don't have 8-10 students per class, I have an entire school of students with profound academic, behavioral, and basic life skill-related needs, and students with a multitude of serious medical conditions. My students are not little Joey who has a hard time reading at grade level, but gets along pretty well otherwise...they are students who are no longer able to be taught in public schools because public schools are not equipped to meet their severe needs.

I don't write 8-10 IEPs, I personally maintain a caseload where I write, manage, and maintain more than 50. My students are taught at a 1:1 ratio, but their individual teachers (who run the programming I develop and oversee) do not write the IEPs, I do. And they are not canned and spit out by a software program, they are generated personally by me, based on analysis of input from a team of educators, behavioral analysts and therapists, speech language pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and medical professionals assigned to each individual student. I write them based on exhaustive, detailed data taken intensively on each individual student over a series of months by myself and all the above listed professionals, not off somebody else's slapdash paragraph of generic present levels. There are no generic, cut n' paste goals and objectives. Every single goal I write for a student is tailored specifically to that student's needs. It's the way it has to be. The reason we are so successful with these very challenging students is because of the pains we take to totally individualize.

It's likely you've experienced something very different. Most families who come to our school have experienced slapdash crap the likes of which you describe. We just do things differently, and better. It's time-consuming, but worth it, because it results in truly individualized education for students with such extreme barriers that it's really necessary to completely eschew anything that smacks of one size fits all. And I don't have to contend with the headache of being on the taxpayer payroll and tolerate all the ill-informed braying and bellyaching that that entails. I get to just focus on helping kids learn, and doing my job the way it needs to be done. It's nice.

I realize that it's really trendy in the current environment to paint educators as scumbags and adversaries who are trying to shirk their responsibilities and screw parents and kids over. But speaking for myself and for others I know who happen to work with those students wtih severe special needs, I don't see it. I only see people who are incredibly dedicated to supporting kids who often get overlooked, avoided by those too intimidated to try to teach them, and erroneously labeled ineducable learn to the best of their ability.
 
Old 09-02-2011, 11:33 PM
 
63 posts, read 97,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skatergirl View Post
Why do you think would a teacher wait with only 3 days until school starts? I find it hard to believe that she plans on reading it over the holiday weekend. Is this just a hostile act or a pretty typical way of operating? Opinions appreciated.
Teacher hasn't read my kid's IEP yet by "skatergirl"
Are you serious? As if there were any doubt b4, we are definitely a society of entitlement. The teacher probably has 30 kids per class, and at least 30 IEP's in a binder somewhere. Even if she/he did read it, it wouldn't make a big difference unless your childs requires someone to wipe his/her rear end. These little documents are filled with things like: check for understanding, preferential seating, extra time on assignments, oral admin for testing. Honestly people, this stuff is just a bunch of crap. I like the college professor who said (pre- ADA) "we would just help the handicap kid up the stairs..." Almighty govt. has become our caretaker. No wonder our government is in the state it's in. Stop criticizing teachers, they have enough on their plates without you breathing down their neck about your child's IEP. Don't like it, then I suggest you home school your child. Not only will all of his/her IEP's be followed to a "T", but he/she will most likely be better educated and have better manners.
 
Old 09-03-2011, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,827 posts, read 39,473,952 times
Reputation: 48645
In all honesty, any parent has EVERY RIGHT to be VERY involved in keeping teachers accountable for following IEP guidelines and ensuring that they are followed. I would EXPECT parents to be first and foremost advocates for their children's needs - it's really their duty. In some cases, breathing down teachers' necks is going to be absolutely necessary...but you don't really know that, yet, before the school year even really has started.

Thing is, you can be that advocate without fostering a needlessly adversarial relationship with those whose job it is to teach your kid and follow any and all accommodations and modifications that were developed for your kid. Coming in with a gigantic chip on one's shoulder generally always does more harm than good. There are better ways to be an advocate. Like, for one, perhaps waiting to see if there is even a problem before you run in with guns blazing and create a tense, awkward, and defensive atmosphere in the process.
 
Old 09-03-2011, 01:01 AM
 
102 posts, read 144,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Yep...I'm staying late tonight to do IEP paperwork, and will probably come in on Labor Day itself to make copies and set up the conference room for the IEP meeting that I have scheduled for first thing on Tuesday morning. No complaints, here; I'm fine with it. But it's very definitely a 'working' holiday.
Just chiming in...I'm taking off for Saturday and Sunday, but I'll be back in my classroom for at least a few hours on Monday.

Are you sure the teacher has received the IEP? In my former school I might not even know there was an IEP for a couple of weeks. Maybe write a note after about a week introducing yourself and asking about it?
 
Old 09-03-2011, 06:22 AM
 
Location: GOVERNMENT of TRAITORS & NAZIS
20,599 posts, read 22,776,609 times
Reputation: 7630
Here is my can of worms....I like mine FRIED.

I have three new IEP students this year. I also have 15 from last year who have IEPs on my case load. I will have read NONE.

Why?

Because 90% are so far off base that the IEP goals and objectives and PLAAP (PLAAF) do not even resemble the student. In the past I have read IEPs where the student was said to have a 70 FSIQ, was oppositional and 3-4 other anti-social attributes. I was all prepared, and when the student arrived in my class, someone must have switched kids. They were polite, and eager. And if that kid had a 70 FSIQ, the evaluator was deaf, dumb and blind. And this was just 6 months after the IEP and re-eval had been written.

Not that I don't beleive in transformations, but NO ONE can change that much in six months--especially after a lifetime of IEPs that all read the same?

Obviously, the student might have had a problem years ago? Then someone just cloned the IEP and from one year to the next they continued cloning...The entire IEP was worthless.

Then there are the IEPS that are writtem with PLAAPs like BOBBIE CANNOT READ. or SUZIE CANNOT DO MATH....based on teacher observation Jamar is unable to perform grade level XXX.
Where is the data? The standardized scores that demonstrate where the students' deficits are in reading or math? I read an IEP like this and I am CONFUSED. Do they need to improve comprehension? Decoding skills? What are the student's strengths in reading, if any?
To say the student cannot read at grade level, based on teacher observation and their strength is they like to help the teacher in the classroom is worthless academically.
So to assume that a teacher is hostile because they have not read an IEP might be a little judgemental.
I would ask to meet with the teacher and simply ask what they have planned to address your child's needs? It might surprise you what a teacher knows about teaching.
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