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Old 09-10-2011, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,295,417 times
Reputation: 3648

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I do not understand the pie analogy. Most high schools around here have 8 or 9 academic periods a day as it is on a traditional school. I do not know of a single high school that only has six or seven periods, do they just not have electives?
We only had 6 periods at my high school. There was still plenty of time for electives.

Core classes were:

Math - 4 years
English - 4 years
Science - 3 years
History - 3 years (senior year was govt/econ)
Foreign language - 2 years (3 recommended)
Fine arts - 1 year (these are electives--music, theater, art)

6th period was sports, which counted as your PE credit. If you didn't want to play a sport, you could take PE during the day. You only needed 1 or 2 years of athletics (I forget), so after that it was either your elective or you could drop it and take something else.

That leaves at least 1 elective class per year. I'm not sure why you'd ever need more than that. Most of us ended up taking a class or two at the junior college during the summer to get requirements out of the way (at a weighted GPA, no less) which freed up additional periods. I ended up graduating with 4 years of everything, in addition to a full year of AP econ, AP psych, engineering (elective), painting, theater, drivers ed, and was a TA.

6 periods didn't preclude anyone who wanted to from getting in electives.

Side note: All the middle/high schools around here today have 7 periods, whether or not they're on block. The exception being the schools that have semester long blocks--they take 4 classes each semester.
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:56 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,164 posts, read 39,263,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
38?? Is that even legal?

My largest class this year is 19 and even that feels tight in my room.

I suppose like most things how it is implemented is what makes or breaks something. I love block scheduling (such as it exists at my school) and would not go back to traditional scheduling for any reason.
Yep, any number is "legal" in MD. The Associations are allowed to negotiate on salary and working conditions. MSDE, backed up by a ruling from the MD Attorney General, declared class size not a negotiable item under working conditions a number of years ago. Other Counties will negotiate class size, Prince George's will not.

Someone mentioned differentiated instruction during the block. Our sum total inservice time in the week before we implemented the block schedule was a 10 minute presentation on how to play Jeopardy with the class.
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:07 PM
 
4,541 posts, read 9,504,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
He's taking Calc AB and BC together? Damn.
lol! That's what my DH and I said too! We're glad we aren't him. There are only 16 in the class which is really nice though.

We are still debating if he will take the AP tests. We have met with a counselor at the University he wants to attend and he was advised to not skip anything in that area. He wants to go into Aerospace Engineering.
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:11 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,164 posts, read 39,263,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkcoop View Post
lol! That's what my DH and I said too! We're glad we aren't him. There are only 16 in the class which is really nice though.

We are still debating if he will take the AP tests. We have met with a counselor at the University he wants to attend and he was advised to not skip anything in that area. He wants to go into Aerospace Engineering.


If he knows the colleges he wants to go to find out their AP credit policies. Most will not grant credit or exemptions for AP scores for classes in the student's major. They want the prospective engineer to take their Calc classes, the prospective History teacher to take their US History class, etc.

Saves you $86/test if that's the policy.
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:44 PM
 
4,541 posts, read 9,504,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
If he knows the colleges he wants to go to find out their AP credit policies. Most will not grant credit or exemptions for AP scores for classes in the student's major. They want the prospective engineer to take their Calc classes, the prospective History teacher to take their US History class, etc.

Saves you $86/test if that's the policy.
That's what I'm thinking. That's basically what the counselor said - they will let them skip if they test out (know someone who is doing that), but wouldn't recommend it.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:01 PM
 
15,762 posts, read 13,199,215 times
Reputation: 19651
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Yep, any number is "legal" in MD. The Associations are allowed to negotiate on salary and working conditions. MSDE, backed up by a ruling from the MD Attorney General, declared class size not a negotiable item under working conditions a number of years ago. Other Counties will negotiate class size, Prince George's will not.

Someone mentioned differentiated instruction during the block. Our sum total inservice time in the week before we implemented the block schedule was a 10 minute presentation on how to play Jeopardy with the class.
Wow. Just wow.

Science teachers are not supposed to have more than 24 if it is a lab class and that is a national standard. If districts go over that they are inviting law suits should and accident occur.

I think the largest class in my school is one of the Enviro Sci ones which has 22 this year. We are a very successful school and I am sure it is in large part due to our small class sizes.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:09 PM
 
15,762 posts, read 13,199,215 times
Reputation: 19651
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
We only had 6 periods at my high school. There was still plenty of time for electives.

Core classes were:

Math - 4 years
English - 4 years
Science - 3 years
History - 3 years (senior year was govt/econ)
Foreign language - 2 years (3 recommended)
Fine arts - 1 year (these are electives--music, theater, art)

6th period was sports, which counted as your PE credit. If you didn't want to play a sport, you could take PE during the day. You only needed 1 or 2 years of athletics (I forget), so after that it was either your elective or you could drop it and take something else.

That leaves at least 1 elective class per year. I'm not sure why you'd ever need more than that. Most of us ended up taking a class or two at the junior college during the summer to get requirements out of the way (at a weighted GPA, no less) which freed up additional periods. I ended up graduating with 4 years of everything, in addition to a full year of AP econ, AP psych, engineering (elective), painting, theater, drivers ed, and was a TA.

6 periods didn't preclude anyone who wanted to from getting in electives.

Side note: All the middle/high schools around here today have 7 periods, whether or not they're on block. The exception being the schools that have semester long blocks--they take 4 classes each semester.

Ahhh, maybe its a state thing. NJ requires 4 years of English and Gym, 3 of math, science, history and language, two of arts, tech and language. Plus at least 3 electives.

That would not be possible on a 6 period day.

Even with a nine period day which my daughter had until this year, she frequently didn't take a lunch in order to take an extra elective in math or science.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:19 PM
 
18,856 posts, read 30,492,371 times
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Teachers at schools on block schedules are actually paid more than teachers in schools with regular schedules. It is completely annoying, to see a teacher who teaches at a school that has five blocks a day, with one period for prep...so, he only teaches four classes a day.Compared with a teacher who teaches 6 periods a day, with one period for a prep.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:26 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,164 posts, read 39,263,926 times
Reputation: 40662
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
Teachers at schools on block schedules are actually paid more than teachers in schools with regular schedules. It is completely annoying, to see a teacher who teaches at a school that has five blocks a day, with one period for prep...so, he only teaches four classes a day.Compared with a teacher who teaches 6 periods a day, with one period for a prep.

Huh?

If you're going per pupil on an A/B block that teacher is paid less per pupil than a straight 6.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:38 PM
 
18,856 posts, read 30,492,371 times
Reputation: 25990
I don't know, all I know is that block teachers got 85 minutes off a day, whereas regular scheduled teachers got 47 minutes off a day...over a school year...how many more minutes is the regular scheduled teacher working than the block teacher...not into the math, I will leave that for a math teacher to figure out...but I never thought it was fair...
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