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Old 09-12-2011, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Olympus Mons, Mars
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Well, tell me this example isn't an accurate representation of the stupidity of our young people today:


Jaywalking - Geographically Challenged (Embarrassing!) - YouTube

In addition, I find it interesting how seemingly proud these youngsters are of their stupidity, not in the least embarrassed.
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Old 09-12-2011, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Virginia
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I don't think it's accurate. I'd bet that most of my third graders could get many of those questions correct.

I wonder how many correct answers were given that they didn't show.
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Old 09-12-2011, 08:37 PM
 
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Some of those questions were not that easy.

I was 9 of 11.

Yea, some of them were more common sense, but...

The majority of the American populace (or the populace for any country for that matter) will not remember facts which have no relevance to their life or popular media events.

So, everybody should know the general location of Iraq because it is plastered all over CNN. But who knows where the location of Djibouti is or where the Ottoman Empire is.

But go to a meeting of United States Congress and I guarantee you there will be multiple reps who cannot name all five great lakes. Even more so if you walked into a meeting at say, JP Morgan.

Last edited by jobaba; 09-12-2011 at 09:06 PM..
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Old 09-12-2011, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^As above. I"ve watched enough Jaywalking to see how edited it is. He's trying to make people look stupid. My kids (20 somethings) generally know the answers to the questions he's asking.
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Old 09-12-2011, 08:44 PM
 
6,946 posts, read 10,828,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^As above. I"ve watched enough Jaywalking to see how edited it is. He's trying to make people look stupid. My kids (20 somethings) generally know the answers to the questions he's asking.
I've seen it on other shows and sometimes it works, but...

The countries on the Island of Great Britain?

If I were to guess the number of people who got Wales and Scotland in there, it'd be probably less than 10% of the general American populace...

That is not a trivia question I would consider common knowledge.
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:57 AM
 
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The UK is confusing to a lot of Americans.

When people refer to "the Irish" or "Ireland" the American mind tends to merge both Northern Ireland and The Republic of Ireland together as one entity, because they both make up the island of Ireland. Americans assume that whole island is one country. But you don't include The Republic of Ireland when you're talking about the United Kingdom. Only Northern Ireland is part of the UK. It can be confusing for American people who haven't lived or grown up there, or even visited.

When someone says or refers to the British Islands... I think most American's assume that includes all of Ireland, when that is not correct. "British Islands" only includes the Northern Ireland part of the island of Ireland, not the Republic of Ireland part of the island.

So it can be confusing, I suppose.

And until Catherine Zeta Jones came along, most American people forgot Wales altogether it seems like!
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:07 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,363,417 times
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Jay Leno goes out of his way to find people that don't know the answers to his questions. How funny would it be if he asked a bunch of kids where Ireland was and they all gave the right answers??
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Old 09-14-2011, 09:30 AM
 
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Leno's segments on Jaywalking serve a purpose to make people laugh, not necessarily to show how dumb people are, that's just a side benefit. :-)

Retained knowledge has to be connected to someone in a personal way otherwise it simply isn't retained by most people.

I often find it ironic how so many people think it's normal and expected to not know how to do basic Alegbra as adults yet they think it's a crime when people don't know history or geography. It's the same basic principal after all....you either understood it when you learned it or you didn't and you either retained what you learned or you didn't.

Personally I had(have) no real interest whatsoever in history and would easily be one of the people who could not name important people of history or state dates of events etc. I just don't have enough interest overall to retain it. That does not make me 'dumb'. If there were to be a reason to re-learn it I could and would pass any question asked. I just don't have a general interest in retaining all that specific information.
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:29 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,502,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
Some of those questions were not that easy.

I was 9 of 11.

Yea, some of them were more common sense, but...

The majority of the American populace (or the populace for any country for that matter) will not remember facts which have no relevance to their life or popular media events.

So, everybody should know the general location of Iraq because it is plastered all over CNN. But who knows where the location of Djibouti is or where the Ottoman Empire is.

But go to a meeting of United States Congress and I guarantee you there will be multiple reps who cannot name all five great lakes. Even more so if you walked into a meeting at say, JP Morgan.
There are some very good points in this thread about knowledge being local and relevant to one's life experience. Having been born and raised in that region, I do know Midwest geography and history very well, including the location of each Great Lake along with why that part of the nation is called the Midwest despite being in the eastern half of the country. But I wouldn't consider someone uneducated if they confuse lakes Huron and Erie.
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:33 AM
 
740 posts, read 1,807,804 times
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I'm a geographer by trade but I don't know the answers to many of these questions.

Ask me stuff about the US and i'll should be good to go, but i'm usually looking at maps on the city level.
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