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Old 09-27-2011, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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It's a completely different job. It's not "head teacher." Different jobs come with different duties and consequently, different pay.

 
Old 09-27-2011, 05:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Going into administration does require additional schooling.
So does teaching. Even with a teacher who has a master's degree, or a PhD, the administrator is able to be "in charge" of teachers. This is just plain wrong.
 
Old 09-27-2011, 05:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
In general, both teachers and administrators have advanced degrees. The administrator will make more though partly because s/he has more responsibility. Principals, for example, are supervising teachers. I assume that your boss makes more than you because s/he has employees that s/he is responsible for overseeing. Administrators also often oversee the budget for the school or discipline for the entire student body.

Principals are a different story- they are responsible for an entire school. I'm referring to assistant principals, curriculum specialists, etc., there is no way they would be held as accountable as teachers, especially by the general public.
 
Old 09-27-2011, 05:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
The administrator does have a lot more for which he/she is responsible. It is also a 12 month contract vs. a 10 month contract.
Hmmm. It's also an office job with a lunch hour, as many bathroom breaks as you like, adult co-workers, and a pretty definite career progression. Very few parent complaining phone calls/emails, also. I would think they would make a whole lot less than teachers who have no lunch hour, programmed bathroom breaks, chid co-workers, and lots of parent/public interaction.
 
Old 09-27-2011, 05:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
It's a completely different job. It's not "head teacher." Different jobs come with different duties and consequently, different pay.
That's my point- they shouldn't be HEAD TEACHER. There should be far fewer administrative positions. Teachers should be much more involved in "management". I put it in quotes, because education management is a very recent phenomenom. 30 years ago, there was a principal, maybe an assistant principal and a secretary. Now there are all kinds of assistants and specialists. Have kids really changed all that much?
 
Old 09-27-2011, 06:09 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Kids haven't changed much (well there are more identified as SpecEd, LD, ADD, ED, etc.) but the laws mandating their education have.
 
Old 09-27-2011, 06:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Kids haven't changed much (well there are more identified as SpecEd, LD, ADD, ED, etc.) but the laws mandating their education have.
Which need to be taught by special ed TEACHERS, this certainly shouldn't inflate the administration numbers as they have been.
 
Old 09-27-2011, 07:10 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,112 posts, read 39,184,670 times
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Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
Which need to be taught by special ed TEACHERS, this certainly shouldn't inflate the administration numbers as they have been.
You also mentioned specialists.

I hold no brief for principals but the nature of the job has changed over the past couple or three decades. Or the new breed of principals is in place. They're no longer old Mr. Smith who started at the school as a teacher (and who may have even graduated from it) and moved up when the old principall retired and Smith was the logical choice to replace him.

The new breed are naked careerists who became administrators for the money, not the belief they can make things better. Most don't know the names of most of the students, even in a small school. Some don't even know the names of their staff members. The teachers are interchangeable cogs in the wheel and it doesn't matter what they teach or what they're good at as long as they fill a hole in the schedule.

The new breed are numbers crunchers who spend their days in their office on their Blackberries and watching closed circuit TV of the hallways. When they're in the building and not out at meetings or networking that is.

Their favorite saying is, "I look bad so what are you going to do to fix it".

How do I know this? I watch. And also, I took admin classes with these guys, I just stayed in the classroom.
 
Old 09-27-2011, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
So does teaching. Even with a teacher who has a master's degree, or a PhD,
Yes, I know. I'm a teacher.

Quote:
the administrator is able to be "in charge" of teachers. This is just plain wrong.
Why is it wrong? They have studied school administration (unlike most teachers who do not intend to GO INTO administration).

Not every teacher WANTS to go into an administrative role (I'd rather gouge my eyes out, personally...I do enough administration of things as a special education teacher, and have really never been much interested in running sh*t in any profession, myself)...but it's a good thing that some do.

EVERY SINGLE ADMINISTRATOR IN EVERY SINGLE SCHOOL in my old district (I work in private ed, not for a district, myself) is a former teacher, most of them from within the district, itself. They know the staff and the students.
 
Old 09-27-2011, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
Hmmm. It's also an office job with a lunch hour, as many bathroom breaks as you like, adult co-workers, and a pretty definite career progression. Very few parent complaining phone calls/emails, also. I would think they would make a whole lot less than teachers who have no lunch hour, programmed bathroom breaks, chid co-workers, and lots of parent/public interaction.
I've taught elementary students for 19 years. I understand I only get 30 minutes for lunch, but my principal and AP aren't leaving the building for lunch nor are they taking an hour break. Sure, they can stop and use the restroom when I can't. Is that really a big issue? My co-workers aren't chid. One reason I don't want to go into administration is because of the parents' complaining phone calls/emails. I get very few, but the principal is the front line for the whole school. We didn't make AYP last year. Who received a direct visit from the cluster superintendent and assistant director? Not me. It is still true that they are on a 12 month contract vs. my 10.
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