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Old 09-25-2011, 09:22 PM
 
4,044 posts, read 6,185,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
You are smarter than me, as a parent. I let my kids play "educational" games all the time. It just never dawned on me I was doing more harm than good.
Not by a mile. I just came later at the party - when there are already quite a few drunks all over the floor. It's starting to stink and it's hard not to notice what the party has done to those who joined.
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Old 09-26-2011, 04:42 AM
 
613 posts, read 842,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post

The best they can do is to keep the kids away from video games, drugs or other temptations - but isn't this a bar set way too low? This is nothing a good set of healthy house rules cannot solve.

After all...who forces those parents to buy all those video games for the kids? Or give them access to video games? Or even worse...drugs?
Video games in the same class as drugs and other temptations? Seriously?
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Old 09-26-2011, 05:09 AM
 
572 posts, read 1,108,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wsop View Post
Video games in the same class as drugs and other temptations? Seriously?
Yep, you didn't know that. And having school dances is the first step towards prostitution. (please note the dripping sarcasm).
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Old 09-26-2011, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Texas
43,471 posts, read 52,484,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wsop View Post
Video games in the same class as drugs and other temptations? Seriously?
Anything that is abused, affects lifestyle, and can't be handled in moderation might as well be the same thing.
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Old 09-26-2011, 08:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wsop View Post
Video games in the same class as drugs and other temptations? Seriously?
No, not in the same class. Still not something I am crazy about.
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Old 09-26-2011, 08:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo61397 View Post
Yep, you didn't know that. And having school dances is the first step towards prostitution. (please note the dripping sarcasm).
So unnecessary.
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Old 09-26-2011, 09:32 AM
 
11,636 posts, read 20,399,317 times
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I agree with much of what has been said in this thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
Of course they do. In this country, those are children whose parents have the money to bust on frills.
Not true. Athletic activities do not have to cost a whole lot of money. $300 for 5 months of an activity is pretty reasonable and scholarships are available for the truly needy. You will often find that professional athletes in the US come from LESS affluent than average backgrounds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
They will perform better academically because of their family's overall socio-economic status not because they play sports. If they didn't play sports and they read for pleasure instead in their free time they would perform even better!
I don't think you really understand the role that sports plays for disadvantaged youth in the US. Athletes span the entire socioeconomic spectrum and are a beacon of hope for kids who come from disadvantaged areas.

It is not as simple as saying that if they weren't spending time playing sports they would be reading more and doing better. For some athletes sports are the only reason that they go to school at all. They go so they can play. They maintain their grades so they can play. Those kids would NOT do better in school if they were not athletes. They would probably do worse, or drop out.

There are also the kids like my son who are looking for sports to help them get in better colleges. Sports can be a "hook" to get kids into better colleges. At the schools that my son is applying to all the kids are smart, have good grades/test scores. It is the other stuff that sets a student apart from the rest that helps him get into a particular school.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
No, sports does not make a child well-rounded. It may make him more athletic, more muscular and... well...sporty. But not "well-rounded" in the academic/"Rennaissance" term of the word.
Athletics makes a child more well rounded in the sense that a child knows about something outside of the realm of school. I know that you are something of a school snob and I can tell you that all the kids that apply to top universities are smart. They all have good grades. They all have high test scores. It is the rest of the person that makes them appealing to schools.

Colleges want to attract an interesting student body. And the student body is just not that interesting if every student goes to school, comes home, studies and reads and then goes to bed. Colleges want artists, musicians, athletes, poets, etc....on campus.

The top schools in the US are not looking for students who ONLY excel in the classroom. They are looking for people who are leaders (athletics is great for that), scholars, musicians, artists, speakers, etc.
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Old 09-26-2011, 10:00 AM
 
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No, sports does not make a child well-rounded. It may make him more athletic, more muscular and... well...sporty. But not "well-rounded" in the academic/"Rennaissance" term of the word.

My husband is in the US military, he graduated from the Air Force Academy. He was one of few graduates that did not have a 4.0 GPA, he actually had a 3.75 out of high school. The reason he was admitted-- he participated in sports and extra-curricular activities. I applied to many colleges including Notre Dame. I was accepted to every college I applied to, including Notre Dame with a 3.58 out of high school, why? My admissions letter said that I was active in the community, church, and in athletics, and they were looking for "well-rounded students." I didn't end up going, because my parents couldn't afford an Ivy League education. And I'm not a good athlete to get an athletic scholarship.
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Old 09-26-2011, 10:45 AM
 
4,044 posts, read 6,185,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
Not true. Athletic activities do not have to cost a whole lot of money. $300 for 5 months of an activity is pretty reasonable and scholarships are available for the truly needy. You will often find that professional athletes in the US come from LESS affluent than average backgrounds.

Bet you whatever you wish that those needy athletes on scholarships are not the best academic performers. The topic was whether playing sports will make a child perform better academically. I argue no. Many argue yes. Yet to be convinced.

What makes a child perform better academically are academic-related activities, reading being the most important of them all by many, many miles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
I don't think you really understand the role that sports plays for disadvantaged youth in the US.
I do - for disadvantaged kids; but I wasn't talking about the disadvantaged kids.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
It is not as simple as saying that if they weren't spending time playing sports they would be reading more and doing better. For some athletes sports are the only reason that they go to school at all.
I know. We are already talking about a very special category here that will only accept anything related to schooling if they are allowed to play lots of sports. That is a VERY special category, indeed. The discussion was not about this category.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
There are also the kids like my son who are looking for sports to help them get in better colleges. Sports can be a "hook" to get kids into better colleges.
I could launch into an entirley separate debate over the appropriateness of having such links between sports and institutions of higher learning but I will not. That is a completely different topic. I am con - but I know many people in this country are for. That's OK. This is a separate thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
Athletics makes a child more well rounded in the sense that a child knows about something outside of the realm of school. I know that you are something of a school snob and I can tell you that all the kids that apply to top universities are smart. They all have good grades. They all have high test scores. It is the rest of the person that makes them appealing to schools.

Sure. However, I personally do not see any reason why Harvard or whoever should differentiate based on athletics (unless you count commercial interests). In my opinion, institutions of higher learning should be completely separated from commercial models - but I know, they are not in this country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
Colleges want to attract an interesting student body.
Define interesting. IMO, colleges should attract highly intelligent, intellectually-inclined students. Not athletes. Colleges are institutions of higher education, not higher athleticism. Have separate institutions for the manifestation of such athletic talents - don't mix them with higher ed. The NFL is a good model. I would even argue the same for music. There should be music schools for that, not Harvard. Yes - colleges are largely about being book-ish.

Now, I do realize that by bringing up the sports issue I have just committed blasphemy in this culture. I do nevertheless maintain that an intense focus on sports is going to take away from academic pursuits. We all have 24 hours in the day - not more, not less.
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Old 09-26-2011, 10:50 AM
 
4,044 posts, read 6,185,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo61397 View Post
No, sports does not make a child well-rounded. It may make him more athletic, more muscular and... well...sporty. But not "well-rounded" in the academic/"Rennaissance" term of the word.

My husband is in the US military, he graduated from the Air Force Academy. He was one of few graduates that did not have a 4.0 GPA, he actually had a 3.75 out of high school. The reason he was admitted-- he participated in sports and extra-curricular activities
.

So he was admitted not because sports helped him achieve academic excellence, but DESPITE NOT being academically excellent. Had I been the school, I would have admitted another one with the 4.00 GPA instead. If you ask me, your husband unfairly took the spot of an academically more deserving student.

But good thing I am not the school, right?
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