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Old 09-27-2011, 09:21 PM
 
8,021 posts, read 6,230,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
And what class are we going to get rid of in order to make room for this one?

I teach in a small school with no electives to senior year, even then it is between an engineering course and a science one. So what science class or engineering class are we going to get rid of?

It's a skill that is taught in almost every college, so maybe you mean it for just kids not going to college. Either way, if you want to make something a requirement you have to decide what we are going to get rid of. There are only so many hours in a day, or days in a year.
Check comment #3. Besides, beyond math, science, english and social studies what other courses are kids taking in junior and senior year if they're not electives? And are those courses more important than learning job skills?
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Old 09-28-2011, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
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I think public speaking is extremely important. Presentation skills. Why isn't that emphasized?

Why are schools so quick to test kids all year on english, math, science....yet they seem to leave out job searching skills, networking, resume building, basic finance, consumer finance, how to fill out a mortgage application, etc.

Critical thinking and job searching skills should come first.
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Old 09-28-2011, 04:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ro2113 View Post
Check comment #3. Besides, beyond math, science, english and social studies what other courses are kids taking in junior and senior year if they're not electives? And are those courses more important than learning job skills?
Our kids take english, math, history, gym, a language and science due to state mandates. Our school mission as a science academy requires an engineering class each year and another science.

And as the fact we have 100% acceptance to college and 100% employment after college, for over 10 years, I would say it is more important.
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Old 09-28-2011, 05:02 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,410,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Our kids take english, math, history, gym, a language and science due to state mandates. Our school mission as a science academy requires an engineering class each year and another science.

And as the fact we have 100% acceptance to college and 100% employment after college, for over 10 years, I would say it is more important.
Do they take "history" for 4 years in high school though or is it a "social science" requirement? Our school requires "Economics" in 12th grade as part of the social science requirement which is where many of these skills are taught as well as offering an elective course that I outlined earlier. We also have 7 class periods so that opens up more electives. 96% of our students go on to a 4 year college after high school but we are just a lowly public school.
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:12 AM
 
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My high school required a semester of consumer education. This was separate from social studies.
California, late 70s.
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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As a small employer, I am always baffled at how clueless some young job seekers are. Most of these young grads show up dressed shabbily, and immediately ask "Are you hiring right now?" No resume, and if I ask for one, they send me something hastily prepared with a poorly worded cover letter. If they do get an interview, they show up in jeans and a t-shirt, and often act like they're doing me a favor my stopping in to talk. Their conversational skills are often quite lacking.

People have to realize job seeking these days is more than spamming your resume out there, or filling out a billion applications. It's about making a connection to a potential employer, networking with your contacts, etc. Too many young people seem to think employers are going to hold the door open for them, and beg them to come fill a job. Those days are long gone, if they ever existed.
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
I think public speaking is extremely important. Presentation skills. Why isn't that emphasized?
In my home state, a semester of public speaking is required...it's done sophomore year, typically. The only issue is that many schools will fulfill that requirement, and that's it...there aren't additional levels to take outside that one semester. My home state also requires a semester of consumer economics to graduate, usually taken senior year, where basics of budgeting, learning about credit and related issues, and basic personal finance are tackled. Again, it's only a semester that's required, but it's better than nothin'. My home state has its issues re: education (mostly in funding it, like everywhere), but there are some things they do get at least (sort of) right.

Quote:
Why are schools so quick to test kids all year on english, math, science....yet they seem to leave out job searching skills, networking, resume building, basic finance, consumer finance, how to fill out a mortgage application, etc.
Because English, math, and science are the standards that are federally mandated to be assessed via standardized test courtesy of crappy NCLB legislation. Welcome to the land of teaching to the test. Sucks, but so does the legislation.

Quote:
Critical thinking and job searching skills should come first.
While I don't think there's a hierarchy of what should come first (literacy being at least as important as critical thinking skills, but all are interwoven), I definitely agree that important things get left in the dust as schools focus on doing the bare minimum to meet AYP and continue to get funding/keep accreditation.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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Thanks for posting this, Ro2113. I think it's a great idea, though I would require the class in 9th or 10th grade, like my high school required in the 1990's.

All freshmen had to take a keyboarding class that taught typing. The first semester focused on typical keyboard muscle memorization, and the second semester focused on using those keyboard skills to typeset and compose resumes, cover letters, business letters, and business memos. This was in the early 1990's, before most people had email. It was one of the most useful classes I ever took, as it helped me write English essays and college applications faster, find summer jobs while in high school, and eventually led to working as an office aide/receptionist.

It's not a bad investment for the individual student and the taxpaying community considering I never had a problem finding employment just because I knew how to type and write resumes and memos. At 18, I was able to work full-time, pay for an apartment with two roommates, and pay for my own community college tuition and books - no student loans. My DH never learned how to type. He doesn't have to know how to type, and fortunately doesn't need to for his job, but there are times when he wishes he could type faster than 30 wpm - especially when he takes 10-20 minutes longer than his peers in writing memos and evaluations.

My kids (currently in 7th and 9th grade) are already required to type written work and create PowerPoint presentations, though they've never taken such a class. Not knowing how to type makes my 9th grader take hours to type up an essay. I tried having my kids and husband use the Mavis Beacon typing software this summer to teach them typing, but it was excruciatingly boring, and it doesn't include the business writing portion of a good keyboarding class like the one I had the fortune to receive in my high school.

I do think it's worth sacrificing a year of art, music, or foreign language to take such a class. All of those classes are great, but it's also good to learn a few strong job skills that are nearly guaranteed to secure employment. There are always office aide and customer service temp jobs for people who can type and use computers. It's not enough to raise a family on, but enough to help young adults work through college - and possibly begin working in the industry of their choice.
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Old 09-28-2011, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Summerville, SC
3,383 posts, read 6,847,772 times
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there are classes that coudl be avoided. I went to a private school, I had a basic economics class. Thing that is crazy... still managed it with theology, year round, and added class on top of the norm.


I know music, art is important, but I think a little over emphasized. I honestly think maybe should be more like a sport, kind of extra curricular if needed. I never had an interest, weaseled my way out of them, and haven't had to deal with anything.

I also kind of on the fence about foreign languages. Seems everyone takes them but no one speaks several languages(obviously because to become fluent you need to use it)
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Old 09-28-2011, 02:58 PM
 
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Our school does a class in technology where the kids write a resume, research professions and then research ways to get the jobs they want, which normally includes a college search. They are all required to take economics in their senior year. They also do career exploration in middle school. My college freshman son used the basic resume he created (updated, of course) in the tech class to apply for summer jobs.
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