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Old 09-28-2011, 03:51 PM
 
15,757 posts, read 13,180,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Do they take "history" for 4 years in high school though or is it a "social science" requirement? Our school requires "Economics" in 12th grade as part of the social science requirement which is where many of these skills are taught as well as offering an elective course that I outlined earlier. We also have 7 class periods so that opens up more electives. 96% of our students go on to a 4 year college after high school but we are just a lowly public school.
They either take sociology or current events. We also have 8 periods but at least 2 of them are science.

And I teach at a public school too.
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
And what class are we going to get rid of in order to make room for this one?

I teach in a small school with no electives to senior year, even then it is between an engineering course and a science one. So what science class or engineering class are we going to get rid of?

It's a skill that is taught in almost every college, so maybe you mean it for just kids not going to college. Either way, if you want to make something a requirement you have to decide what we are going to get rid of. There are only so many hours in a day, or days in a year.
That's just what I was thinking. Stuff like this comes up occasionally. " "They" should teach personal finance, job interviewing techniqes, resume writing, how to rent an apt., how to do laundry, etc, etc". Yet people complain about the low test scores in the US compared to other countries. Frankly, most of this stuff can be found on the web, and at "career centers" in most colleges. My daughter brought home a very helpful handout from the U of CO career center that covered most of this stuff. It's not rocket science.
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:02 PM
 
8,021 posts, read 6,227,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That's just what I was thinking. Stuff like this comes up occasionally. " "They" should teach personal finance, job interviewing techniqes, resume writing, how to rent an apt., how to do laundry, etc, etc". Yet people complain about the low test scores in the US compared to other countries. Frankly, most of this stuff can be found on the web, and at "career centers" in most colleges. My daughter brought home a very helpful handout from the U of CO career center that covered most of this stuff. It's not rocket science.
And yet these same kids who may ace science and math don't know how to do simple things like create and update a resume or fill out a rent application. They can have all the book smarts in the world but if they don't know these basic skills they won't be able to even show people how smart they are.
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,040,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
In my home state, a semester of public speaking is required...it's done sophomore year, typically. The only issue is that many schools will fulfill that requirement, and that's it...there aren't additional levels to take outside that one semester. My home state also requires a semester of consumer economics to graduate, usually taken senior year, where basics of budgeting, learning about credit and related issues, and basic personal finance are tackled. Again, it's only a semester that's required, but it's better than nothin'. My home state has its issues re: education (mostly in funding it, like everywhere), but there are some things they do get at least (sort of) right.
I don't think public school treats public speaking well at all.

A. You need to keep it up. I.e., you can get rusty if you haven't done it in a while. It should be continous...from 11th to 12th grade, right through to graduation. You need it most as you graduate. Why would it be emphasized in any other grade?

B. Being with only your peers (age wise) is extremely limiting. For example, I belonged to toastmasters for a few years. You get a wide range of ages, backgrounds. You get much more varied feedback. Public speaking and presentation skills are a two way street....the audience can be as important as your speeches. Audience feedback.

Quote:
Because English, math, and science are the standards that are federally mandated to be assessed via standardized test courtesy of crappy NCLB legislation. Welcome to the land of teaching to the test. Sucks, but so does the legislation.
Why are they federally mandated ahead of something more important...like public speaking (confidence)? Isn't confidence important? School has really dropped the ball on these qualities that can't be tested.


Quote:
While I don't think there's a hierarchy of what should come first (literacy being at least as important as critical thinking skills, but all are interwoven), I definitely agree that important things get left in the dust as schools focus on doing the bare minimum to meet AYP and continue to get funding/keep accreditation.
It seems like these schools are just doing the minimum to get funding. And the classes are so arbitrary.

In highschool in the 90's, I took 4 years of foreign language. Why? I don't know. Public speaking, or job application, resume skills seem a lot more practical than taking a foreign language you're going to forget after you take it.

11th and 12th grade should be job preparation, career building skills, networking, social skills, resume building.
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Old 09-29-2011, 05:34 AM
 
12,454 posts, read 27,080,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ro2113 View Post
I believe that secondary schools should devote one semester in the 11th or 12th grade to teach kids how to successfully search for employment. These are basic skills that they will need to have for the rest of their lives so it should be mandated curriculum.

The kids can learn how to write resumes, cover letters, fill out job applications, write business appropriate emails. You name it.

What do you think?
Maybe someone wants to start a thread on what they think would be the ideal curriculum for High School Students...

The above post is the OP.
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Old 09-29-2011, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,988 posts, read 98,832,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ro2113 View Post
And yet these same kids who may ace science and math don't know how to do simple things like create and update a resume or fill out a rent application. They can have all the book smarts in the world but if they don't know these basic skills they won't be able to even show people how smart they are.
Oh, for Pete's sake! For one thing, in my experience, it's not the bright kids who don't know enough to fill out these apps, it's the not so bright ones. Resume writing information is available on the web.

resume writing - Google Search
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Old 09-29-2011, 07:50 AM
 
5,607 posts, read 4,162,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ro2113 View Post
I believe that secondary schools should devote one semester in the 11th or 12th grade to teach kids how to successfully search for employment. These are basic skills that they will need to have for the rest of their lives so it should be mandated curriculum.

The kids can learn how to write resumes, cover letters, fill out job applications, write business appropriate emails. You name it.

What do you think?
I have to disagree with you for the following reasons:

1. Kids headed to college will have access to this information and assistance via career services during their 4 years on campus. Few will know in 11th or 12th grade what degree they want to pursue or what jobs/companies they will be applying to 4-5 years in the future. Effective resumes (and cover letters) should be "tweaked" to highlight the educational or work experiences an individual employer is seeking. Skills learned in HS would be generic and not effective for this group.

2. Kids headed to the workplace after college also need access to this information and assistance. I just think devoting an entire semester is overkill. Perhaps high schools could offer a couple seminars each semester (after school, evenings or even weekends) that interested students could attend. They could offer seminars in writing a resume and cover letter, interview skills and even job search techniques. Experts in these topics are in most communities. Perhaps they'd be willing to devote their time free of charge to help their local school system. Let the schools facilitate this learning and not mandate it.
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Old 09-29-2011, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,988 posts, read 98,832,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
I have to disagree with you for the following reasons:

1. Kids headed to college will have access to this information and assistance via career services during their 4 years on campus. Few will know in 11th or 12th grade what degree they want to pursue or what jobs/companies they will be applying to 4-5 years in the future. Effective resumes (and cover letters) should be "tweaked" to highlight the educational or work experiences an individual employer is seeking. Skills learned in HS would be generic and not effective for this group.

2. Kids headed to the workplace after college also need access to this information and assistance. I just think devoting an entire semester is overkill. Perhaps high schools could offer a couple seminars each semester (after school, evenings or even weekends) that interested students could attend. They could offer seminars in writing a resume and cover letter, interview skills and even job search techniques. Even if the HS had to pay outside experts to give the seminars, the cost would be less than requiring a semester long course.
Pretty much every college has a career center to help students with that stuff. My kids' high school has a "post graduate center" to help kids with post high school life. Perhaps resume writing could be included in their services.
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Old 09-29-2011, 08:06 AM
 
5,607 posts, read 4,162,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Pretty much every college has a career center to help students with that stuff. My kids' high school has a "post graduate center" to help kids with post high school life. Perhaps resume writing could be included in their services.
Yes, that's what I said in #1 as my explanation of why I didn't think kids headed to college needed a class in resume writing, interview skills and job hunting as the OP suggested.

You're lucky your kids' high school has a "post graduate center". Unfortunately, most do not. They have college counselors, but nothing to offer kids not on the college track. In #2, I was suggesting that perhaps high schools could (outside the classroom) facilitate educating kids not headed for college with the skills listed above.
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Old 09-29-2011, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,988 posts, read 98,832,039 times
Reputation: 31396
Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
Yes, that's what I said in #1 as my explanation of why I didn't think kids headed to college needed a class in resume writing, interview skills and job hunting as the OP suggested.

You're lucky your kids' high school has a "post graduate center". Unfortunately, most do not. They have college counselors, but nothing to offer kids not on the college track. In #2, I was suggesting that perhaps high schools could (outside the classroom) facilitate educating kids not headed for college with the skills listed above.
Don't get so huffy! Lots of people repeat concepts on CD.

I was trying to tie in the college career center concept with high school. The post graduate center at my kids' HS helped kids with college, the military, and other placements. Certainly resume writing books could be included in a center like that. Most high schools have a business club of some sort that could put on workshops for job hunting as well.
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